VS.

Calve vs. Cave

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Calveverb

(intransitive) To give birth to a calf.

Cavenoun

A large, naturally-occurring cavity formed underground or in the face of a cliff or a hillside.

‘We found a cave on the mountainside where we could take shelter.’;

Calveverb

(intransitive) To assist the giving of birth of a calf.

Cavenoun

A hole, depression, or gap in earth or rock, whether natural or man-made.

Calveverb

(transitive) To give birth to (a calf).

Cavenoun

A storage cellar, especially for wine or cheese.

‘This wine has been aged in our cave for thirty years.’;

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Calveverb

To shed a large piece, e.g. an iceberg or a smaller block of ice (coming off an iceberg).

‘The glacier was starting to calve even as we watched.’; ‘The iceberg was starting to calve even as we watched.’;

Cavenoun

A place of retreat, such as a man cave.

‘My room was a cozy cave where I could escape from my family.’;

Calveverb

To break off.

‘The sea was dangerous because of icebergs calving off the nearby glacier.’; ‘The sea was dangerous because of ice blocks calving off the nearby iceberg.’; ‘When an iceberg breaks off from a large ice shelf along an existing fissure, it looks like a large, flat rectangle. Typically, only 10 percent of an iceberg is visible above the water. As it calved, the iceberg may have been smooth and flat underneath, but ocean currents would have quickly changed it.’;

Cavenoun

(caving) A naturally-occurring cavity in bedrock which is large enough to be entered by an adult.

‘It was not strictly a cave, but a narrow fissure in the rock.’;

Calveverb

To shed (a large piece, e.g. an iceberg). To set loose (a mass of ice), e.g. a block of ice (coming off an iceberg).

‘The glacier was starting to calve an iceberg even as we watched.’; ‘The iceberg was starting to calve an ice block even as we watched.’;

Cavenoun

(nuclear physics) A shielded area where nuclear experiments can be carried out.

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Calveverb

To bring forth a calf.

Cavenoun

Debris, particularly broken rock, which falls into a drill hole and interferes with drilling.

Calveverb

To bring forth young; to produce offspring.

‘Canst thou mark when the hinds do calve?’; ‘The grassy clods now calved.’;

Cavenoun

(mining) A collapse or cave-in.

Calveverb

To throw off fragments which become icebergs; - said of a glacier.

Cavenoun

The vagina.

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Calveverb

release ice;

‘The icebergs and glaciers calve’;

Cavenoun

A group that breaks from a larger political party or faction on a particular issue.

Calveverb

birth;

‘the whales calve at this time of year’;

Cavenoun

(obsolete) Any hollow place, or part; a cavity.

Cavenoun

(programming) A code cave.

Caveverb

To surrender.

‘He caved under pressure.’;

Caveverb

To collapse.

‘First the braces buckled, then the roof began to cave, then we ran.’;

Caveverb

To hollow out or undermine.

‘The levee has been severely caved by the river current.’;

Caveverb

To engage in the recreational exploration of caves; to spelunk.

‘I have caved from Yugoslavia to Kentucky.’; ‘Let's go caving this weekend.’;

Caveverb

(mining) In room-and-pillar mining, to extract a deposit of rock by breaking down a pillar which had been holding it in place.

‘The deposit is caved by knocking out the posts.’;

Caveverb

To work over tailings to dress small pieces of marketable ore.

Caveverb

(obsolete) To dwell in a cave.

Caveinterjection

look out!; beware!

Cavenoun

A hollow place in the earth, either natural or artificial; a subterraneous cavity; a cavern; a den.

Cavenoun

Any hollow place, or part; a cavity.

Cavenoun

A coalition or group of seceders from a political party, as from the Liberal party in England in 1866. See Adullam, Cave of, in the Dictionary of Noted Names in Fiction.

Caveverb

To make hollow; to scoop out.

‘The mouldred earth cav'd the banke.’;

Caveverb

To dwell in a cave.

Caveverb

To fall in or down; as, the sand bank caved. Hence (Slang), to retreat from a position; to give way; to yield in a disputed matter.

Cavenoun

an underground enclosure with access from the surface of the ground or from the sea

Caveverb

hollow out as if making a cave or opening;

‘The river was caving the banks’;

Caveverb

explore natural caves

Cavenoun

a natural underground chamber in a hillside or cliff

‘the narrow gorge contains a series of prehistoric caves’;

Caveverb

explore caves as a sport

‘they say they cave for the adventure, challenge, and physical exercise’;

Caveverb

capitulate or submit under pressure; cave in

‘he caved because his position had become untenable’; ‘she finally caved in the face of his persistence’;

Caveinterjection

(among children) look out!

Cave

A cave or cavern is a natural void in the ground, specifically a space large enough for a human to enter. Caves often form by the weathering of rock and often extend deep underground.

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