VS.

Caesura vs. Hemistich

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Caesuranoun

A pause or interruption in a poem, music, building, or other work of art.

Hemistichnoun

An approximate half-line of verse, separated from another by a caesura, often for dramatic effect

Caesuranoun

(Classical prosody) Using two words to divide a metrical foot.

Hemistichnoun

An unfinished line of verse

Caesuranoun

(typography) The caesura mark ‖ or ||.

Hemistichnoun

Half a poetic verse or line, or a verse or line not completed.

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Caesuranoun

(rarely) A break of an era or other measure of history and time; where one era ends and another begins.

Hemistich

A hemistich (; via Latin from Greek ἡμιστίχιον, from ἡμι- and στίχος ) is a half-line of verse, followed and preceded by a caesura, that makes up a single overall prosodic or verse unit. In Latin and Greek poetry, the hemistich is generally confined to drama.

‘half’; ‘verse’;

Caesuranoun

A metrical break in a verse, occurring in the middle of a foot and commonly near the middle of the verse; a sense pause in the middle of a foot. Also, a long syllable on which the cæsural accent rests, or which is used as a foot.

‘The prop | er stud | y || of | mankind | is man.’;

Caesuranoun

a pause or interruption (as in a conversation); as, after an ominous caesura the preacher continued.

Caesuranoun

a pause or interruption (as in a conversation);

‘after an ominous caesura the preacher continued’;

Caesuranoun

a break or pause (usually for sense) in the middle of a verse line

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Caesura

A caesura (, pl. caesuras or caesurae; Latin for ), also written cæsura and cesura, is a metrical pause or break in a verse where one phrase ends and another phrase begins.

‘cutting’;

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