VS.

Cadence vs. Tempo

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Cadencenoun

The act or state of declining or sinking.

Temponoun

A frequency or rate.

‘10 calls per hour isn't a bad start, but we'll need to up the tempo if we want to reach our target of selling insurance policies.’;

Cadencenoun

Balanced, rhythmic flow.

Temponoun

(chess) A move which is part of one's own plan or strategy and forces, e.g. by means of a check or attacking a piece, the opponent to make a move which is not bad but of no use for him (the player gains a tempo, the opponent loses a tempo), or equivalently a player achieves the same result in fewer moves by one approach rather than another.

Cadencenoun

The measure or beat of movement.

Temponoun

(bridge) The timing advantage of being on lead, thus being first to initiate a strategy to develop tricks for one's side.

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Cadencenoun

The general inflection or modulation of the voice, or of any sound.

Temponoun

The timing of a particular event – earlier or later than in an alternative situation (as in chess example)

Cadencenoun

(music) A progression of at least two chords which conclude a piece of music, section or musical phrases within it. Sometimes referred to analogously as musical punctuation.

Temponoun

(music) The number of beats per minute in a piece of music; also, an indicative term denoting approximate rate of speed in written music (examples: allegro, andante)

Cadencenoun

(music) A cadenza, or closing embellishment; a pause before the end of a strain, which the performer may fill with a flight of fancy.

Temponoun

(cycling) The steady pace set by the frontmost riders.

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Cadencenoun

(speech) A fall in inflection of a speaker’s voice, such as at the end of a sentence.

Temponoun

A small truck or cargo van with three or four wheels, commonly used for commercial transport and deliveries (particularly in Asian and African countries): a genericized trademark, originally associated with the manufacturer Vidal & Sohn Tempo-Werke GmbH.

Cadencenoun

(dance) A dance move which ends a phrase.

‘The cadence in a galliard step refers to the final leap in a cinquepace sequence.’;

Temponoun

(American football) A rapid rate of play by the offense resulting from reducing the amount of time which elapses after one play ends and the next starts.

Cadencenoun

(fencing) The rhythm and sequence of a series of actions.

Temponoun

The rate or degree of movement in time.

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Cadencenoun

(running) The number of steps per minute.

Temponoun

(music) the speed at which a composition is to be played

Cadencenoun

(cycling) The number of revolutions per minute of the cranks or pedals of a bicycle.

Temponoun

the rate of some repeating event

Cadencenoun

(military) A chant that is sung by military personnel while running or marching; a jody call.

Tempo

In musical terminology, tempo (Italian for plural tempos, or tempi from the Italian plural) is the speed or pace of a given piece. In classical music, tempo is typically indicated with an instruction at the start of a piece (often using conventional Italian terms) and is usually measured in beats per minute (or bpm).

‘time’;

Cadencenoun

(heraldry) cadency

Cadencenoun

(horse-riding) Harmony and proportion of movement, as in a well-managed horse.

Cadenceverb

To give a cadence to.

Cadenceverb

To give structure to.

Cadencenoun

The act or state of declining or sinking.

‘Now was the sun in western cadence low.’;

Cadencenoun

A fall of the voice in reading or speaking, especially at the end of a sentence.

Cadencenoun

A rhythmical modulation of the voice or of any sound; as, music of bells in cadence sweet.

‘Blustering winds, which all night longHad roused the sea, now with hoarse cadence lullSeafaring men o'erwatched.’; ‘The accents . . . were in passion's tenderest cadence.’;

Cadencenoun

Rhythmical flow of language, in prose or verse.

‘Golden cadence of poesy.’; ‘If in any composition much attention was paid to the flow of the rhythm, it was said (at least in the 14th and 15th centuries) to be "prosed in faire cadence."’;

Cadencenoun

See Cadency.

Cadencenoun

Harmony and proportion in motions, as of a well-managed horse.

Cadencenoun

A uniform time and place in marching.

Cadencenoun

The close or fall of a strain; the point of rest, commonly reached by the immediate succession of the tonic to the dominant chord.

Cadenceverb

To regulate by musical measure.

‘These parting numbers, cadenced by my grief.’;

Cadencenoun

(prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of verse

Cadencenoun

the close of a musical section

Cadencenoun

a recurrent rhythmical series

Cadencenoun

a modulation or inflection of the voice

‘the measured cadences that he employed in the Senate’;

Cadencenoun

a rhythmical effect in written text

‘the dry cadences of the essay’;

Cadencenoun

a fall in pitch of the voice at the end of a phrase or sentence.

Cadencenoun

rhythm

‘the thumping cadence of the engines’;

Cadencenoun

a sequence of notes or chords comprising the close of a musical phrase

‘the final cadences of the Prelude’;

Cadence

In Western musical theory, a cadence (Latin cadentia, ) is the end of a phrase in which the melody or harmony creates a sense of resolution. A harmonic cadence is a progression of two or more chords that concludes a phrase, section, or piece of music.

‘a falling’;

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