VS.

Busy vs. Empty

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Busyadjective

Crowded with business or activities; having a great deal going on.

‘We crossed a busy street.’;

Emptyadjective

Devoid of content; containing nothing or nobody; vacant.

‘an empty purse; an empty jug; an empty stomach’;

Busyadjective

Engaged in activity or by someone else.

‘The director cannot see you now: he's busy.’; ‘Her telephone has been busy all day.’; ‘He is busy with piano practice.’; ‘They are busy getting ready for the annual meeting.’;

Emptyadjective

Containing no elements (as of a string or array), opposed to being null (having no valid value).

Busyadjective

Having a lot going on; complicated or intricate.

‘Flowers, stripes, and checks in the same fabric make for a busy pattern.’;

Emptyadjective

(obsolete) Free; clear; devoid; often with of.

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Busyadjective

Officious; meddling.

Emptyadjective

Having nothing to carry, emptyhanded; unburdened.

Busyverb

(transitive) To make somebody busy or active; to occupy.

Emptyadjective

Destitute of effect, sincerity, or sense; said of language.

‘empty words, or threats’;

Busyverb

(transitive) To rush somebody.

Emptyadjective

Unable to satisfy; hollow; vain.

‘empty pleasures’;

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Busynoun

A police officer.

Emptyadjective

Destitute of reality, or real existence; unsubstantial.

‘empty dreams’;

Busyadjective

Engaged in some business; hard at work (either habitually or only for the time being); occupied with serious affairs; not idle nor at leisure; as, a busy merchant.

‘Sir, my mistress sends you wordThat she is busy, and she can not come.’;

Emptyadjective

(obsolete) Producing nothing; unfruitful; said of a plant or tree.

‘an empty vine’;

Busyadjective

Constantly at work; diligent; active.

‘Busy hammers closing rivets up.’; ‘Religious motives . . . are so busy in the heart.’;

Emptyadjective

Destitute of, or lacking, sense, knowledge, or courtesy.

‘empty brains; an empty coxcomb’;

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Busyadjective

Crowded with business or activities; - said of places and times; as, a busy street.

‘To-morrow is a busy day.’;

Emptyverb

To make empty; to void; to remove the contents of.

‘to empty a well or a cistern’; ‘The cinema emptied quickly after the end of the film.’;

Busyadjective

Officious; meddling; foolish active.

‘On meddling monkey, or on busy ape.’;

Emptyverb

(intransitive) Of a river, duct, etc: to drain or flow toward an ultimate destination.

‘Salmon River empties on the W shore about 2 miles below Bear River.’;

Busyadjective

Careful; anxious.

Emptynoun

A container, especially a bottle, whose contents have been used up, leaving it empty.

‘Put the empties out to be recycled.’;

Busyverb

To make or keep busy; to employ; to engage or keep engaged; to occupy; as, to busy one's self with books.

‘Be it thy course to busy giddy mindsWith foreign quarrels.’;

Emptyadjective

Containing nothing; not holding or having anything within; void of contents or appropriate contents; not filled; - said of an inclosure, or a container, as a box, room, house, etc.; as, an empty chest, room, purse, or pitcher; an empty stomach; empty shackles.

Busyverb

keep busy with;

‘She busies herself with her butterfly collection’;

Emptyadjective

Free; clear; devoid; - often with of.

‘I shall find you empty of that fault.’;

Busyadjective

actively or fully engaged or occupied;

‘busy with her work’; ‘a busy man’; ‘too busy to eat lunch’; ‘the line is busy’;

Emptyadjective

Having nothing to carry; unburdened.

‘When ye go ye shall not go empty.’;

Busyadjective

overcrowded or cluttered with detail;

‘a busy painting’; ‘a fussy design’;

Emptyadjective

Destitute of effect, sincerity, or sense; - said of language; as, empty words, or threats.

‘Words are but empty thanks.’;

Busyadjective

intrusive in a meddling or offensive manner;

‘an interfering old woman’; ‘bustling about self-importantly making an officious nuisance of himself’; ‘busy about other people's business’;

Emptyadjective

Unable to satisfy; unsatisfactory; hollow; vain; - said of pleasure, the world, etc.

‘Pleas'd in the silent shade with empty praise.’;

Busyadjective

crowdedwith or characterized by much activity;

‘a very busy week’; ‘a busy life’; ‘a busy street’; ‘a busy seaport’;

Emptyadjective

Producing nothing; unfruitful; - said of a plant or tree; as, an empty vine.

‘Seven empty ears blasted with the east wind.’;

Busyadjective

(of facilities such as telephones or lavatories) unavailable for use by anyone else or indicating unavailability; (`engaged' is a British term for a busy telephone line);

‘her line is busy’; ‘receptionists' telephones are always engaged’; ‘the lavatory is in use’; ‘kept getting a busy signal’;

Emptyadjective

Destitute of, or lacking, sense, knowledge, or courtesy; as, empty brains; an empty coxcomb.

‘That in civility thou seem'st so empty.’;

Busyadjective

having a great deal to do

‘he had been too busy to enjoy himself’;

Emptyadjective

Destitute of reality, or real existence; unsubstantial; as, empty dreams.

Busyadjective

occupied with or concentrating on a particular activity or object of attention

‘the team members are busy raising money’;

Emptynoun

An empty box, crate, cask, etc.; - used in commerce, esp. in transportation of freight; as, "special rates for empties."

Busyadjective

(of a time or place) full of activity

‘I've had a busy day’; ‘the busy city streets’;

Emptyverb

To deprive of the contents; to exhaust; to make void or destitute; to make vacant; to pour out; to discharge; as, to empty a vessel; to empty a well or a cistern.

‘The clouds . . . empty themselves upon the earth.’;

Busyadjective

(of a telephone line) engaged.

Emptyverb

To discharge itself; as, a river empties into the ocean.

Busyadjective

excessively detailed or decorated

‘the lavish set designs are a little too busy’;

Emptyverb

To become empty.

Busyverb

keep oneself occupied

‘she busied herself with her new home’;

Emptynoun

a container that has been emptied;

‘return all empties to the store’;

Busynoun

a police officer

‘I was picked up by the busies for possession’;

Emptyverb

make void or empty of contents;

‘Empty the box’; ‘The alarm emptied the building’;

Emptyverb

become empty or void of its content;

‘The room emptied’;

Emptyverb

leave behind empty; move out of;

‘You must vacate your office by tonight’;

Emptyverb

remove;

‘Empty the water’;

Emptyverb

excrete or discharge from the body

Emptyadjective

holding or containing nothing;

‘an empty glass’; ‘an empty room’; ‘full of empty seats’; ‘empty hours’;

Emptyadjective

devoid of significance or point;

‘empty promises’; ‘a hollow victory’; ‘vacuous comments’;

Emptyadjective

having nothing inside;

‘an empty sphere’;

Emptyadjective

needing nourishment;

‘after skipped lunch the men were empty by suppertime’; ‘empty-bellied children’;

Emptyadjective

emptied of emotion;

‘after the violent argument he felt empty’;

Emptyadjective

containing nothing; not filled or occupied

‘the room was empty of furniture’; ‘she put down her empty cup’;

Emptyadjective

(of a set) containing no members or elements.

Emptyadjective

(of words or a gesture) lacking meaning or sincerity

‘their promises were empty words’;

Emptyadjective

having no value or purpose

‘her life felt empty and meaningless’;

Emptyverb

remove all the contents of (a container)

‘pockets were emptied of loose change’; ‘we empty the till at closing time’;

Emptyverb

remove (the contents) from a container

‘he emptied out the contents of his briefcase’;

Emptyverb

(of a place) be vacated by people in it

‘the pub suddenly seemed to empty’;

Emptyverb

(of a river) flow into (the sea or a lake)

‘the river's southern stream emptied into the estuary’;

Emptynoun

a bottle or glass left empty of its contents

‘the barman collected the empties’;

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