VS.

Busy vs. Bust

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Busyadjective

Crowded with business or activities; having a great deal going on.

‘We crossed a busy street.’;

Bustnoun

A sculptural portrayal of a person's head and shoulders.

Busyadjective

Engaged in activity or by someone else.

‘The director cannot see you now: he's busy.’; ‘Her telephone has been busy all day.’; ‘He is busy with piano practice.’; ‘They are busy getting ready for the annual meeting.’;

Bustnoun

The breasts and upper thorax of a woman.

Busyadjective

Having a lot going on; complicated or intricate.

‘Flowers, stripes, and checks in the same fabric make for a busy pattern.’;

Bustnoun

(slang) The act of arresting someone for a crime, or raiding a suspected criminal operation.

‘a narcotics bust’;

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Busyadjective

Officious; meddling.

Bustnoun

(slang) A failed enterprise; a bomb.

Busyverb

(transitive) To make somebody busy or active; to occupy.

Bustnoun

A player who fails to meet expectations.

Busyverb

(transitive) To rush somebody.

Bustnoun

A refutation of an opening, or of previously published analysis.

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Busynoun

A police officer.

Bustverb

To break.

‘I busted my cooker while trying to fix it.’;

Busyadjective

Engaged in some business; hard at work (either habitually or only for the time being); occupied with serious affairs; not idle nor at leisure; as, a busy merchant.

‘Sir, my mistress sends you wordThat she is busy, and she can not come.’;

Bustverb

To arrest (someone) for a crime.

Busyadjective

Constantly at work; diligent; active.

‘Busy hammers closing rivets up.’; ‘Religious motives . . . are so busy in the heart.’;

Bustverb

To catch (someone) in the act of doing something wrong, socially and morally inappropriate, or illegal, especially when being done in a sneaky or secretive state.

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Busyadjective

Crowded with business or activities; - said of places and times; as, a busy street.

‘To-morrow is a busy day.’;

Bustverb

(snowboarding) An emphatic synonym of do or get.

‘He busted huge air off that jump!’;

Busyadjective

Officious; meddling; foolish active.

‘On meddling monkey, or on busy ape.’;

Bustverb

To reduce in rank.

‘He busted him down to patrolman for insubordination.’;

Busyadjective

Careful; anxious.

Bustverb

(poker) To lose all of one's chips.

Busyverb

To make or keep busy; to employ; to engage or keep engaged; to occupy; as, to busy one's self with books.

‘Be it thy course to busy giddy mindsWith foreign quarrels.’;

Bustverb

(blackjack) To exceed a score of 21.

Busyverb

keep busy with;

‘She busies herself with her butterfly collection’;

Bustverb

To break in (an animal).

Busyadjective

actively or fully engaged or occupied;

‘busy with her work’; ‘a busy man’; ‘too busy to eat lunch’; ‘the line is busy’;

Bustverb

To ejaculate; to eject semen.

Busyadjective

overcrowded or cluttered with detail;

‘a busy painting’; ‘a fussy design’;

Bustadjective

(slang) Without any money, broke, bankrupt.

‘After months of financial problems, the company finally went bust.’;

Busyadjective

intrusive in a meddling or offensive manner;

‘an interfering old woman’; ‘bustling about self-importantly making an officious nuisance of himself’; ‘busy about other people's business’;

Bustnoun

A piece of sculpture representing the upper part of the human figure, including the head, shoulders, and breast.

‘Ambition sighed: she found it vain to trustThe faithless column, and the crumbling bust.’;

Busyadjective

crowdedwith or characterized by much activity;

‘a very busy week’; ‘a busy life’; ‘a busy street’; ‘a busy seaport’;

Bustnoun

The portion of the human figure included between the head and waist, whether in statuary or in the person; the chest or thorax; the upper part of the trunk of the body.

Busyadjective

(of facilities such as telephones or lavatories) unavailable for use by anyone else or indicating unavailability; (`engaged' is a British term for a busy telephone line);

‘her line is busy’; ‘receptionists' telephones are always engaged’; ‘the lavatory is in use’; ‘kept getting a busy signal’;

Bustnoun

A woman's bosom{2}.

Busyadjective

having a great deal to do

‘he had been too busy to enjoy himself’;

Bustverb

To arrest, for committing a crime; - often used in the passive; as, the whole gang got busted.

Busyadjective

occupied with or concentrating on a particular activity or object of attention

‘the team members are busy raising money’;

Bustverb

To break or burst.

Busyadjective

(of a time or place) full of activity

‘I've had a busy day’; ‘the busy city streets’;

Bustverb

In blackjack, to draw a card that causes one's total to exceed twenty-one.

Busyadjective

(of a telephone line) engaged.

Bustverb

To go bankrupt.

Busyadjective

excessively detailed or decorated

‘the lavish set designs are a little too busy’;

Bustnoun

a complete failure;

‘the play was a dismal flop’;

Busyverb

keep oneself occupied

‘she busied herself with her new home’;

Bustnoun

a sculpture of the head and shoulders of a person

Busynoun

a police officer

‘I was picked up by the busies for possession’;

Bustnoun

an occasion for excessive eating or drinking;

‘they went on a bust that lasted three days’;

Bustverb

ruin completely;

‘He busted my radio!’;

Bustverb

search without warning, make a sudden surprise attack on;

‘The police raided the crack house’;

Bustverb

separate or cause to separate abruptly;

‘The rope snapped’; ‘tear the paper’;

Bustverb

go to pieces;

‘The lawn mower finally broke’; ‘The gears wore out’; ‘The old chair finally fell apart completely’;

Bustverb

break open or apart suddenly and forcefully;

‘The dam burst’;

Bustadjective

lacking funds;

‘`skint' is a British slang term’;

Bustnoun

a woman's chest as measured around her breasts

‘a 36-inch bust’;

Bustnoun

a woman's breasts, especially considered in terms of their size

‘a woman with big hips and a big bust’;

Bustnoun

a sculpture of a person's head, shoulders, and chest.

Bustnoun

a period of economic difficulty or depression

‘the boom was followed by the present bust’;

Bustnoun

a raid or arrest by the police

‘a drug bust’;

Bustnoun

a worthless thing

‘cynics remain convinced the political process is a bust’;

Bustnoun

a violent blow

‘a bust on the snout’;

Bustverb

break, split, or burst

‘the colour control had bust’; ‘they bust the tunnel wide open’; ‘the film bust every box office record’;

Bustverb

(of a group or couple) separate, typically after a quarrel

‘now they've bust up, she won't inherit the house’;

Bustverb

violently disrupt

‘men hired to bust up union rallies’;

Bustverb

strike violently

‘Tamara bust him in the eye’;

Bustverb

escape

‘she busted out of prison’;

Bustverb

(in blackjack and similar card games) exceed the score of 21, so losing one's stake.

Bustverb

(of the police) raid or search (premises where illegal activity is suspected)

‘my flat got busted’;

Bustverb

arrest

‘two roadies were busted for drugs’;

Bustverb

be caught in the act of doing something wrong

‘I sneaked up on them and told them they were busted’;

Bustverb

reduce (a soldier) to a lower rank; demote

‘he was busted to private’;

Bustadjective

damaged or broken

‘the vacuum cleaner's bust’;

Bustadjective

bankrupt

‘six of their sponsors have gone bust’;

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