VS.

Burgher vs. Freeman

Published:

Burghernoun

A citizen of a borough or town, especially one belonging to the middle class.

Freemannoun

A free person, particularly:

Burghernoun

A member of the medieval mercantile class.

Freemannoun

A person who is not a serf or slave.

Burghernoun

A citizen of a medieval city.

Freemannoun

(historical) A burgher with full freedom of a city, as opposed to nobles, outsiders, bondsmen, and others.

ADVERTISEMENT

Burghernoun

A prosperous member of the community; a middle class citizen (may connote complacency).

Freemannoun

An honorary freeman: a person who has received an honorary freedom of a city.

Burghernoun

A freeman of a burgh or borough, entitled to enjoy the privileges of the place; any inhabitant of a borough.

Freemannoun

(usually as two words) A person who is a citizen of a free country, as opposed to a subject of a tyranny or totalitarian dictatorship.

Burghernoun

A member of that party, among the Scotch seceders, which asserted the lawfulness of the burgess oath (in which burgesses profess "the true religion professed within the realm"), the opposite party being called antiburghers.

Freemannoun

A person who immigrated to Australia freely, as opposed to those transported as convicts, or such a transported convict who has regained his freedom.

ADVERTISEMENT

Burghernoun

a citizen of an English borough

Freemannoun

An independent fur trapper.

Burghernoun

a member of the middle class

Freemannoun

One who enjoys liberty, or who is not subject to the will of another; one not a slave or vassal.

Freemannoun

A member of a corporation, company, or city, possessing certain privileges; a member of a borough, town, or State, who has the right to vote at elections. See Liveryman.

β€˜Both having been made freemen on the same day.’;

Freemannoun

a person who is not a serf or a slave

ADVERTISEMENT

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons