VS.

Brace vs. Trace

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Bracenoun

(obsolete) Armor for the arm; vambrace.

Tracenoun

An act of tracing.

‘Your cell phone company can put a trace on your line.’;

Bracenoun

(obsolete) A measurement of length, originally representing a person's outstretched arms.

Tracenoun

An enquiry sent out for a missing article, such as a letter or an express package.

Bracenoun

A curved instrument or handle of iron or wood, for holding and turning bits, etc.; a bitstock.

Tracenoun

A mark left as a sign of passage of a person or animal.

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Bracenoun

That which holds anything tightly or supports it firmly; a bandage or a prop.

Tracenoun

A residue of some substance or material.

‘There are traces of chocolate around your lips.’;

Bracenoun

A cord, ligament, or rod, for producing or maintaining tension.

Tracenoun

A very small amount.

‘All of our chocolates may contain traces of nuts.’;

Bracenoun

A thong used to regulate the tension of a drum.

Tracenoun

(electronics) A current-carrying conductive pathway on a printed circuit board.

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Bracenoun

The state of being braced or tight; tension.

Tracenoun

An informal road or prominent path in an arid area.

Bracenoun

Harness; warlike preparation.

Tracenoun

One of two straps, chains, or ropes of a harness, extending from the collar or breastplate to a whippletree attached to a vehicle or thing to be drawn; a tug.

Bracenoun

(typography) A curved, pointed line, also known as "curly bracket": { or } connecting two or more words or lines, which are to be considered together, such as in {role, roll}; in music, used to connect staves.

Tracenoun

(engineering) A connecting bar or rod, pivoted at each end to the end of another piece, for transmitting motion, especially from one plane to another; specifically, such a piece in an organ stop action to transmit motion from the trundle to the lever actuating the stop slider.

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Bracenoun

A pair, a couple; originally used of dogs, and later of animals generally and then other things, but rarely human persons. (The plural in this sense is unchanged.) In British use (as plural), this is a particularly common reference to game birds.

Tracenoun

(fortification) The ground plan of a work or works.

Bracenoun

A piece of material used to transmit, or change the direction of, weight or pressure; any one of the pieces, in a frame or truss, which divide the structure into triangular parts. It may act as a tie, or as a strut, and serves to prevent distortion of the structure, and transverse strains in its members. A boiler brace is a diagonal stay, connecting the head with the shell.

Tracenoun

(geometry) The intersection of a plane of projection, or an original plane, with a coordinate plane.

Bracenoun

(nautical) A rope reeved through a block at the end of a yard, by which the yard is moved horizontally; also, a rudder gudgeon.

Tracenoun

(mathematics) The sum of the diagonal elements of a square matrix.

Bracenoun

The mouth of a shaft.

Tracenoun

(grammar) An empty category occupying a position in the syntactic structure from which something has been moved, used to explain constructions such as wh-movement and the passive.

Bracenoun

Straps or bands to sustain trousers; suspenders.

Traceverb

(transitive) To follow the trail of.

Bracenoun

(plural in the US, singular or plural in the UK) A system of wires, brackets, and elastic bands used to correct crooked teeth or to reduce overbite.

Traceverb

To follow the history of.

Bracenoun

(soccer) Two goals scored by one player in a game.

Traceverb

(transitive) To draw or sketch lightly or with care.

‘He carefully traced the outlines of the old building before him.’;

Braceverb

To prepare for something bad, such as an impact or blow.

‘All hands, brace for impact!’; ‘Brace yourself!’; ‘The boy has no idea about everything that's been going on. You need to brace him for what's about to happen.’;

Traceverb

(transitive) To copy onto a sheet of paper superimposed over the original, by drawing over its lines.

Braceverb

To place in a position for resisting pressure; to hold firmly.

‘He braced himself against the crowd.’;

Traceverb

To copy; to imitate.

Braceverb

(nautical) To swing round the yards of a square rigged ship, using braces, to present a more efficient sail surface to the direction of the wind.

‘to brace the yards’;

Traceverb

To walk; to go; to travel.

Braceverb

To stop someone for questioning, usually said of police.

Traceverb

To walk over; to pass through; to traverse.

Braceverb

To confront with questions, demands or requests.

Traceverb

To follow the execution of the program by making it to stop after every instruction, or by making it print a message after every step.

Braceverb

To furnish with braces; to support; to prop.

‘to brace a beam in a building’;

Tracenoun

One of two straps, chains, or ropes of a harness, extending from the collar or breastplate to a whiffletree attached to a vehicle or thing to be drawn; a tug.

Braceverb

To draw tight; to tighten; to put in a state of tension; to strain; to strengthen.

‘to brace the nerves’;

Tracenoun

A connecting bar or rod, pivoted at each end to the end of another piece, for transmitting motion, esp. from one plane to another; specif., such a piece in an organ-stop action to transmit motion from the trundle to the lever actuating the stop slider.

Braceverb

To bind or tie closely; to fasten tightly.

Tracenoun

A mark left by anything passing; a track; a path; a course; a footprint; a vestige; as, the trace of a carriage or sled; the trace of a deer; a sinuous trace.

Bracenoun

That which holds anything tightly or supports it firmly; a bandage or a prop.

Tracenoun

A very small quantity of an element or compound in a given substance, especially when so small that the amount is not quantitatively determined in an analysis; - hence, in stating an analysis, often contracted to tr.

Bracenoun

A cord, ligament, or rod, for producing or maintaining tension, as a cord on the side of a drum.

‘The little bones of the ear drum do in straining and relaxing it as the braces of the war drum do in that.’;

Tracenoun

A mark, impression, or visible appearance of anything left when the thing itself no longer exists; remains; token; vestige.

‘The shady empire shall retain no traceOf war or blood, but in the sylvan chase.’;

Bracenoun

The state of being braced or tight; tension.

‘The laxness of the tympanum, when it has lost its brace or tension.’;

Tracenoun

The intersection of a plane of projection, or an original plane, with a coordinate plane.

Bracenoun

A piece of material used to transmit, or change the direction of, weight or pressure; any one of the pieces, in a frame or truss, which divide the structure into triangular parts. It may act as a tie, or as a strut, and serves to prevent distortion of the structure, and transverse strains in its members. A boiler brace is a diagonal stay, connecting the head with the shell.

Tracenoun

The ground plan of a work or works.

Bracenoun

A vertical curved line connecting two or more words or lines, which are to be taken together; thus, boll, bowl; or, in music, used to connect staves.

Traceverb

To mark out; to draw or delineate with marks; especially, to copy, as a drawing or engraving, by following the lines and marking them on a sheet superimposed, through which they appear; as, to trace a figure or an outline; a traced drawing.

‘Some faintly traced features or outline of the mother and the child, slowly lading into the twilight of the woods.’;

Bracenoun

A rope reeved through a block at the end of a yard, by which the yard is moved horizontally; also, a rudder gudgeon.

Traceverb

To follow by some mark that has been left by a person or thing which has preceded; to follow by footsteps, tracks, or tokens.

‘You may trace the deluge quite round the globe.’; ‘I feel thy power . . . to trace the waysOf highest agents.’;

Bracenoun

A curved instrument or handle of iron or wood, for holding and turning bits, etc.; a bitstock.

Traceverb

Hence, to follow the trace or track of.

‘How all the way the prince on footpace traced.’;

Bracenoun

A pair; a couple; as, a brace of ducks; now rarely applied to persons, except familiarly or with some contempt.

‘He is said to have shot . . . fifty brace of pheasants.’; ‘A brace of brethren, both bishops, both eminent for learning and religion, now appeared in the church.’; ‘But you, my brace of lords.’;

Traceverb

To copy; to imitate.

‘That servile path thou nobly dost decline,Of tracing word, and line by line.’;

Bracenoun

Straps or bands to sustain trousers; suspenders.

‘I embroidered for you a beautiful pair of braces.’;

Traceverb

To walk over; to pass through; to traverse.

‘We do tracethis alley up and down.’;

Bracenoun

Harness; warlike preparation.

‘For that it stands not in such warlike brace.’;

Traceverb

To walk; to go; to travel.

‘Not wont on foot with heavy arms to trace.’;

Bracenoun

Armor for the arm; vantbrace.

Tracenoun

a just detectable amount;

‘he speaks French with a trace of an accent’;

Bracenoun

The mouth of a shaft.

Tracenoun

an indication that something has been present;

‘there wasn't a trace of evidence for the claim’; ‘a tincture of condescension’;

Braceverb

To furnish with braces; to support; to prop; as, to brace a beam in a building.

Tracenoun

a suggestion of some quality;

‘there was a touch of sarcasm in his tone’; ‘he detected a ghost of a smile on her face’;

Braceverb

To draw tight; to tighten; to put in a state of tension; to strain; to strengthen; as, to brace the nerves.

‘And welcome war to brace her drums.’;

Tracenoun

drawing created by tracing

Braceverb

To bind or tie closely; to fasten tightly.

‘The women of China, by bracing and binding them from their infancy, have very little feet.’; ‘Some who spurs had first braced on.’;

Tracenoun

either of two lines that connect a horse's harness to a wagon or other vehicle or to a whiffletree

Braceverb

To place in a position for resisting pressure; to hold firmly; as, he braced himself against the crowd.

‘A sturdy lance in his right hand he braced.’;

Tracenoun

a visible mark (as a footprint) left by the passage of person or animal or vehicle

Braceverb

To move around by means of braces; as, to brace the yards.

Traceverb

follow, discover, or ascertain the course of development of something;

‘We must follow closely the economic development is Cuba’; ‘trace the student's progress’;

Braceverb

To get tone or vigor; to rouse one's energies; - with up.

Traceverb

make a mark or lines on a surface;

‘draw a line’; ‘trace the outline of a figure in the sand’;

Bracenoun

a support that steadies or strengthens something else;

‘he wore a brace on his knee’;

Traceverb

to go back over again;

‘we retraced the route we took last summer’; ‘trace your path’;

Bracenoun

two items of the same kind

Traceverb

pursue or chase relentlessly;

‘The hunters traced the deer into the woods’; ‘the detectives hounded the suspect until they found the him’;

Bracenoun

a set of two similar things considered as a unit

Traceverb

discover traces of;

‘She traced the circumstances of her birth’;

Bracenoun

either of two punctuation marks ({ or }) used to enclose textual material

Traceverb

make one's course or travel along a path; travel or pass over, around, or along;

‘The children traced along the edge of the drak forest’; ‘The women traced the pasture’;

Bracenoun

a rope on a square-rigged ship that is used to swing a yard about and secure it

Traceverb

copy by following the lines of the original drawing on a transparent sheet placed upon it; make a tracing of;

‘trace a design’; ‘trace a pattern’;

Bracenoun

elastic straps that hold trousers up (usually used in the plural)

Traceverb

read with difficulty;

‘Can you decipher this letter?’; ‘The archeologist traced the hieroglyphs’;

Bracenoun

an appliance that corrects dental irregularities

Traceverb

find or discover by investigation

‘police are trying to trace a white van seen in the area’;

Bracenoun

the stock of a tool used for turning a drilling bit

Traceverb

find or describe the origin or development of

‘Bob's book traces his flying career with the RAF’;

Bracenoun

a structural member used to stiffen a framework

Traceverb

follow or mark the course or position of (something) with one's eye, mind, or finger

‘through the binoculars, I traced the path I had taken the night before’;

Braceverb

prepare (oneself) for something unpleasant or difficult

Traceverb

take (a particular path or route)

‘a tear traced a lonely path down her cheek’;

Braceverb

support or hold steady and make steadfast, with or as if with a brace;

‘brace your elbows while working on the potter's wheel’;

Traceverb

copy (a drawing, map, or design) by drawing over its lines on a superimposed piece of transparent paper

‘trace a map of the world on to a large piece of paper’;

Braceverb

support by bracing

Traceverb

draw (a pattern or line), especially with one's finger or toe

‘she traced a pattern in the dirt with the toe of her shoe’;

Braceverb

cause to be alert and energetic;

‘Coffee and tea stimulate me’; ‘This herbal infusion doesn't stimulate’;

Traceverb

give an outline of

‘the article traces out some of the connections between education, qualifications, and the labour market’;

Bracenoun

a device fitted to something, in particular a weak or injured part of the body, to give support

‘a neck brace’;

Tracenoun

a mark, object, or other indication of the existence or passing of something

‘remove all traces of the old adhesive’; ‘the aircraft disappeared without trace’;

Bracenoun

a strengthening piece of iron or timber used in building or carpentry.

Tracenoun

a line or pattern displayed by an instrument to show the existence or nature of something which is being recorded or measured.

Bracenoun

a wire device fitted in the mouth to straighten the teeth.

Tracenoun

a physical change in the brain presumed to be caused by a process of learning or memory.

Bracenoun

a drilling tool with a crank handle and a socket to hold a bit.

Tracenoun

a very small quantity, especially one too small to be accurately measured

‘his body contained traces of amphetamines’; ‘trace quantities of PCBs’;

Bracenoun

a rope attached to the yard of a ship for trimming the sail.

Tracenoun

a barely discernible indication of something

‘just a trace of a smile’;

Bracenoun

a pair of straps that pass over the shoulders and fasten to the top of trousers at the front and back to hold them up.

Tracenoun

a procedure to investigate the source of something, such as the place from which a telephone call was made

‘we've got a trace on the call’;

Bracenoun

a pair of something, typically of birds or mammals killed in hunting

‘thirty brace of grouse’;

Tracenoun

a line which represents the projection of a curve or surface on a plane or the intersection of a curve or surface with a plane.

Bracenoun

either of the two marks { and }, used either to indicate that two or more items on one side have the same relationship as each other to the single item to which the other side points, or in pairs to show that words between them are connected.

Tracenoun

a path or track.

Bracenoun

a similar mark connecting staves to be performed at the same time.

Tracenoun

the sum of the elements in the principal diagonal of a square matrix.

Braceverb

make (a structure) stronger or firmer with wood, iron, or other forms of support

‘the posts were braced by lengths of timber’;

Tracenoun

each of the two side straps, chains, or ropes by which a horse is attached to a vehicle that it is pulling.

Braceverb

press (one's body or part of one's body) firmly against something in order to stay balanced

‘she braced her feet against a projecting shelf’; ‘he stood with legs braced’;

Braceverb

prepare (someone) for something difficult or unpleasant

‘both stations are bracing themselves for job losses’;

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