VS.

Bound vs. Pound

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Boundverb

simple past tense and past participle of bind

‘I bound the splint to my leg.’; ‘I had bound the splint with duct tape.’;

Poundnoun

A unit of mass equal to 16 avoirdupois ounces (= 453.592 37 g). Today this value is the most common meaning of "pound" as a unit of weight.

Boundverb

To surround a territory or other geographical entity.

‘France, Portugal, Gibraltar and Andorra bound Spain.’; ‘Kansas is bounded by Nebraska on the north, Missouri on the east, Oklahoma on the south and Colorado on the west.’;

Poundnoun

A unit of mass equal to 12 troy ounces (≈ 373.242 g). Today, this is a common unit of weight when measuring precious metals, and is little used elsewhere.

Boundverb

(mathematics) To be the boundary of.

Poundnoun

(US) The symbol # (octothorpe, hash)

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Boundverb

(intransitive) To leap, move by jumping.

‘The rabbit bounded down the lane.’;

Poundnoun

The unit of currency used in the United Kingdom and its dependencies. It is divided into 100 pence.

Boundverb

(transitive) To cause to leap.

‘to bound a horse’;

Poundnoun

Any of various units of currency used in Egypt and Lebanon, and formerly in the Republic of Ireland, Cyprus and Israel.

Boundverb

To rebound; to bounce.

‘a rubber ball bounds on the floor’;

Poundnoun

Any of various units of currency formerly used in the United States.

‘the Rhode Island pound; the New Hampshire pound’;

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Boundverb

To cause to rebound; to throw so that it will rebound; to bounce.

‘to bound a ball on the floor''’;

Poundnoun

Abbreviation for pound-force, a unit of force/weight. Using this abbreviation to describe pound-force is inaccurate and unscientific.

Boundadjective

(with infinitive) Obliged (to).

‘You are not legally bound to reply.’;

Poundnoun

A place for the detention of stray or wandering animals. An animal shelter.

Boundadjective

(with infinitive) Very likely (to), certain to

‘They were bound to come into conflict eventually.’;

Poundnoun

(by metonymy) The people who work for the pound

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Boundadjective

That cannot stand alone as a free word.

Poundnoun

A place for the detention of automobiles that have been illegally parked, abandoned, etc. Short form of impound.

‘Beverly Hills Cop, Paramount Pictures, 1984:’;

Boundadjective

Constrained by a quantifier.

Poundnoun

A section of a canal between two adjacent locks.

Boundadjective

(dated) Constipated; costive.

Poundnoun

A kind of fishing net, having a large enclosure with a narrow entrance into which fish are directed by wings spreading outward.

Boundadjective

Confined or restricted to a certain place; e.g. railbound.

Poundnoun

A hard blow.

Boundadjective

Unable to move in certain conditions; e.g. snowbound.

Poundverb

To confine in, or as in, a pound; to impound.

Boundadjective

(obsolete) Ready, prepared.

Poundverb

(transitive) To strike hard, usually repeatedly.

Boundadjective

Ready to start or go (to); moving in the direction (of).

‘Which way are you bound?’; ‘Is that message bound for me?’;

Poundverb

(transitive) To crush to pieces; to pulverize.

Boundnoun

A boundary, the border which one must cross in order to enter or leave a territory.

‘I reached the northern bound of my property, took a deep breath and walked on.’; ‘Somewhere within these bounds you may find a buried treasure.’;

Poundverb

To eat or drink very quickly.

‘You really pounded that beer!’;

Boundnoun

(mathematics) A value which is known to be greater or smaller than a given set of values.

Poundverb

To pitch consistently to a certain location.

‘The pitcher has been pounding the outside corner all night.’;

Boundnoun

A sizeable jump, great leap.

‘The deer crossed the stream in a single bound.’;

Poundverb

To beat strongly or throb.

‘As I tiptoed past the sleeping dog, my heart was pounding but I remained silent.’; ‘My head was pounding.’;

Boundnoun

A spring from one foot to the other in dancing.

Poundverb

To penetrate sexually, with vigour.

‘I was pounding her all night!’;

Boundnoun

(dated) A bounce; a rebound.

‘the bound of a ball''’;

Poundverb

To advance heavily with measured steps.

Boundnoun

The external or limiting line, either real or imaginary, of any object or space; that which limits or restrains, or within which something is limited or restrained; limit; confine; extent; boundary.

‘He hath compassed the waters with bounds.’; ‘On earth's remotest bounds.’; ‘And mete the bounds of hate and love.’;

Poundverb

(engineering) To make a jarring noise, as when running.

‘The engine pounds.’;

Boundnoun

A leap; an elastic spring; a jump.

‘A bound of graceful hardihood.’;

Poundverb

To wager a pound on.

Boundnoun

Rebound; as, the bound of a ball.

Poundverb

To strike repeatedly with some heavy instrument; to beat.

‘With cruel blows she pounds her blubbered cheeks.’;

Boundnoun

Spring from one foot to the other.

Poundverb

To comminute and pulverize by beating; to bruise or break into fine particles with a pestle or other heavy instrument; as, to pound spice or salt.

Boundverb

To limit; to terminate; to fix the furthest point of extension of; - said of natural or of moral objects; to lie along, or form, a boundary of; to inclose; to circumscribe; to restrain; to confine.

‘Where full measure only bounds excess.’; ‘Phlegethon . . .Whose fiery flood the burning empire bounds.’;

Poundverb

To strike heavy blows; to beat.

Boundverb

To name the boundaries of; as, to bound France.

Poundverb

To make a jarring noise, as in running; as, the engine pounds.

Boundverb

To move with a sudden spring or leap, or with a succession of springs or leaps; as the beast bounded from his den; the herd bounded across the plain.

‘Before his lord the ready spaniel bounds.’; ‘And the waves bound beneath me as a steedThat knows his rider.’;

Poundverb

To confine in, or as in, a pound; to impound.

Boundverb

To rebound, as an elastic ball.

Poundnoun

An inclosure, maintained by public authority, in which cattle or other animals are confined when taken in trespassing, or when going at large in violation of law; a pinfold.

Boundverb

To make to bound or leap; as, to bound a horse.

Poundnoun

A level stretch in a canal between locks.

Boundverb

To cause to rebound; to throw so that it will rebound; as, to bound a ball on the floor.

Poundnoun

A kind of net, having a large inclosure with a narrow entrance into which fish are directed by wings spreading outward.

Bound

imp. & p. p. of Bind.

Poundnoun

A certain specified weight; especially, a legal standard consisting of an established number of ounces.

Boundadjective

Restrained by a hand, rope, chain, fetters, or the like.

Poundnoun

A British denomination of money of account, equivalent to twenty shillings sterling, and equal in value to about $4.86. There is no coin known by this name, but the gold sovereign is of the same value.

Boundadjective

Inclosed in a binding or cover; as, a bound volume.

Poundnoun

16 ounces;

‘he tried to lift 100 pounds’;

Boundadjective

Under legal or moral restraint or obligation.

Poundnoun

the basic unit of money in Great Britain; equal to 100 pence

Boundadjective

Constrained or compelled; destined; certain; - followed by the infinitive; as, he is bound to succeed; he is bound to fail.

Poundnoun

the basic unit of money in Syria; equal to 100 piasters

Boundadjective

Resolved; as, I am bound to do it.

Poundnoun

the basic unit of money in the Sudan; equal to 100 piasters

Boundadjective

Constipated; costive.

Poundnoun

the basic unit of money in Lebanon; equal to 100 piasters

Boundadjective

Ready or intending to go; on the way toward; going; - with to or for, or with an adverb of motion; as, a ship is bound to Cadiz, or for Cadiz.

Poundnoun

formerly the basic unit of money in Ireland; equal to 100 pence

Boundnoun

a line determining the limits of an area

Poundnoun

the basic unit of money in Egypt; equal to 100 piasters

Boundnoun

the line or plane indicating the limit or extent of something

Poundnoun

the basic unit of money in Cyprus; equal to 100 cents

Boundnoun

a light springing movement upwards or forwards

Poundnoun

a nontechnical unit of force equal to the mass of 1 pound with an acceleration of free fall equal to 32 feet/sec/sec

Boundverb

move forward by leaps and bounds;

‘The horse bounded across the meadow’; ‘The child leapt across the puddle’; ‘Can you jump over the fence?’;

Poundnoun

United States writer who lived in Europe; strongly influenced the development of modern literature (1885-1972)

Boundverb

form the boundary of; be contiguous to

Poundnoun

a public enclosure for stray or unlicensed dogs;

‘unlicensed dogs will be taken to the pound’;

Boundverb

place limits on (extent or access);

‘restrict the use of this parking lot’; ‘limit the time you can spend with your friends’;

Poundnoun

the act of pounding (delivering repeated heavy blows);

‘the sudden hammer of fists caught him off guard’; ‘the pounding of feet on the hallway’;

Boundverb

spring back; spring away from an impact;

‘The rubber ball bounced’; ‘These particles do not resile but they unite after they collide’;

Poundverb

hit hard with the hand, fist, or some heavy instrument;

‘the salesman pounded the door knocker’; ‘a bible-thumping Southern Baptist’;

Boundadjective

held with another element, substance or material in chemical or physical union

Poundverb

strike or drive against with a heavy impact;

‘ram the gate with a sledgehammer’; ‘pound on the door’;

Boundadjective

confined by bonds;

‘bound and gagged hostages’;

Poundverb

move heavily or clumsily;

‘The heavy man lumbered across the room’;

Boundadjective

secured with a cover or binding; often used as a combining form;

‘bound volumes’; ‘leather-bound volumes’;

Poundverb

move rhythmically;

‘Her heart was beating fast’;

Boundadjective

(usually followed by `to') governed by fate;

‘bound to happen’; ‘an old house destined to be demolished’; ‘he is destined to be famous’;

Poundverb

partition off into compartments;

‘The locks pound the water of the canal’;

Boundadjective

covered or wrapped with a bandage;

‘the bandaged wound on the back of his head’; ‘an injury bound in fresh gauze’;

Poundverb

shut up or confine in any enclosure or within any bounds or limits;

‘The prisoners are safely pounded’;

Boundadjective

headed or intending to head in a certain direction; often used as a combining form as in `college-bound students';

‘children bound for school’; ‘a flight destined for New York’;

Poundverb

place or shut up in a pound;

‘pound the cows so they don't stray’;

Boundadjective

bound by an oath;

‘a bound official’;

Poundverb

break down and crush by beating, as with a pestle;

‘pound the roots with a heavy flat stone’;

Boundadjective

bound by contract

Boundadjective

confined in the bowels;

‘he is bound in the belly’;

Boundverb

walk or run with leaping strides

‘shares bounded ahead in early dealing’; ‘Louis came bounding down the stairs’;

Boundverb

(of an object) rebound from a surface

‘bullets bounded off the veranda’;

Boundverb

form the boundary of; enclose

‘the ground was bounded by a main road on one side and a meadow on the other’;

Boundverb

place within certain limits; restrict

‘freedom of action is bounded by law’;

Boundverb

past and past participle of bind

Boundnoun

a leaping movement towards or over something

‘I went up the steps in two effortless bounds’;

Boundnoun

a territorial limit; a boundary

‘the ancient bounds of the forest’;

Boundnoun

a limitation or restriction on feeling or action

‘enthusiasm to join the union knew no bounds’; ‘it is not beyond the bounds of possibility that the issue could arise again’;

Boundnoun

a limiting value

‘an upper bound on each modulus’;

Boundadjective

certain to be or to do or have something

‘there is bound to be a change of plan’;

Boundadjective

obliged by law, circumstances, or duty to do something

‘I'm bound to do what I can to help Sam’; ‘I'm bound to say that I have some doubts’;

Boundadjective

restricted or confined to a specified place

‘his job kept him city-bound’;

Boundadjective

prevented from operating normally by the specified conditions

‘blizzard-bound Boston’;

Boundadjective

(of a book) having a specified binding

‘fine leather-bound books’;

Boundadjective

(of a grammatical element) occurring only in combination with another form.

Boundadjective

in Chomskyan linguistics, (of a reflexive, reciprocal, or other linguistic unit) dependent for its reference on another noun phrase in the same sentence.

Boundadjective

going or ready to go towards a specified place

‘an express train bound for Edinburgh’; ‘the three moon-bound astronauts’;

Boundadjective

destined or very likely to have a specified experience

‘they were bound for disaster’;

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