VS.

Bounce vs. Tumble

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Bounceverb

(intransitive) To change the direction of motion after hitting an obstacle.

‘The tennis ball bounced off the wall before coming to rest in the ditch.’;

Tumblenoun

A fall, especially end over end.

‘I took a tumble down the stairs and broke my tooth.’;

Bounceverb

(intransitive) To move quickly up and then down, or vice versa, once or repeatedly.

‘He bounces nervously on his chair.’;

Tumblenoun

A disorderly heap.

Bounceverb

(transitive) To cause to move quickly up and down, or back and forth, once or repeatedly.

‘He bounced the child on his knee.’; ‘The children were bouncing a ball against a wall.’;

Tumblenoun

(informal) An act of sexual intercourse.

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Bounceverb

To suggest or introduce (an idea, etc.) to (off or by) somebody, in order to gain feedback.

‘I'm meeting Bob later to bounce some ideas off him about the new product range.’;

Tumbleverb

(intransitive) To fall end over end; to roll.

Bounceverb

(intransitive) To leap or spring suddenly or unceremoniously; to bound.

‘She bounced happily into the room.’;

Tumbleverb

(intransitive) To perform gymnastics such as somersaults, rolls, and handsprings.

Bounceverb

To move rapidly (between).

Tumbleverb

(intransitive) To roll over and over.

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Bounceverb

To be refused by a bank because it is drawn on insufficient funds.

‘We can’t accept further checks from you, as your last one bounced.’;

Tumbleverb

(intransitive) To drop rapidly.

‘Share prices tumbled after the revelation about the company's impending failure.’;

Bounceverb

To fail to cover have sufficient funds for (a draft presented against one's account).

‘He tends to bounce a check or two toward the end of each month, before his payday.’;

Tumbleverb

To have sexual intercourse.

Bounceverb

To leave.

‘Let’s wrap this up, I gotta bounce.’;

Tumbleverb

(transitive) To smooth and polish a rough surface on relatively small parts.

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Bounceverb

To eject violently, as from a room; to discharge unceremoniously, as from employment.

Tumbleverb

To muss, to make disorderly; to tousle or rumple.

‘to tumble a bed’;

Bounceverb

(sometimes employing the preposition with) To have sexual intercourse.

Tumbleverb

(colloquial) To suddenly realise, to get wind of.

Bounceverb

To attack unexpectedly.

‘The squadron was bounced north of the town.’;

Tumbleverb

(cryptocurrency) To obscure the audit trail of funds by means of a tumbler.

Bounceverb

To turn power off and back on; to reset

‘See if it helps to bounce the router.’;

Tumbleverb

To roll over, or to and fro; to throw one's self about; as, a person in pain tumbles and tosses.

Bounceverb

To return undelivered.

‘What’s your new email address? The old one bounces.’; ‘The girl in the bar told me her address was [email protected], but my mail to that address bounced back to me.’;

Tumbleverb

To roll down; to fall suddenly and violently; to be precipitated; as, to tumble from a scaffold.

‘He who tumbles from a tower surely has a greater blow than he who slides from a molehill.’;

Bounceverb

To land hard and lift off again due to excess momentum.

‘The student pilot bounced several times during his landing.’;

Tumbleverb

To play tricks by various movements and contortions of the body; to perform the feats of an acrobat.

Bounceverb

To land hard at unsurvivable velocity with fatal results.

‘After the mid-air collision, his rig failed and he bounced. BSBD.’;

Tumbleverb

To turn over; to turn or throw about, as for examination or search; to roll or move in a rough, coarse, or unceremonious manner; to throw down or headlong; to precipitate; - sometimes with over, about, etc.; as, to tumble books or papers.

Bounceverb

To mix (two or more tracks of a multi-track audio tape recording) and record the result onto a single track, in order to free up tracks for further material to be added.

‘Bounce tracks two and three to track four, then record the cowbell on track two.’;

Tumbleverb

To disturb; to rumple; as, to tumble a bed.

Bounceverb

To bully; to scold.

Tumblenoun

Act of tumbling, or rolling over; a fall.

Bounceverb

(archaic) To strike or thump, so as to rebound, or to make a sudden noise; to knock loudly.

Tumblenoun

an acrobatic feat of rolling or turning end over end

Bounceverb

(archaic) To boast; to bluster.

Tumblenoun

a sudden drop from an upright position;

‘he had a nasty spill on the ice’;

Bouncenoun

A change of direction of motion after hitting the ground or an obstacle.

Tumbleverb

fall down, as if collapsing;

‘The tower of the World Trade Center tumbled after the plane hit it’;

Bouncenoun

A movement up and then down (or vice versa), once or repeatedly.

Tumbleverb

cause to topple or tumble by pushing

Bouncenoun

An email return with any error.

Tumbleverb

roll over and over, back and forth

Bouncenoun

The sack, licensing.

Tumbleverb

fly around;

‘The clothes tumbled in the dryer’; ‘rising smoke whirled in the air’;

Bouncenoun

A bang, boom.

Tumbleverb

fall apart;

‘the building crimbled after the explosion’; ‘Negociations broke down’;

Bouncenoun

A drink based on brandyW.

Tumbleverb

throw together in a confused mass;

‘They tumbled the teams with no apparent pattern’;

Bouncenoun

A heavy, sudden, and often noisy, blow or thump.

Tumbleverb

understand, usually after some initial difficulty;

‘She didn't know what her classmates were plotting but finally caught on’;

Bouncenoun

Bluster; brag; untruthful boasting; audacious exaggeration; an impudent lie; a bouncer.

Tumbleverb

fall suddenly and sharply;

‘Prices tumbled after the devaluation of the currency’;

Bouncenoun

Scyllium catulus, a European dogfish.

Tumbleverb

put clothes in a tumbling barrel, where they are whirled about in hot air, usually with the purpose of drying;

‘Wash in warm water and tumble dry’;

Bouncenoun

A genre of New Orleans music.

Tumbleverb

suffer a sudden downfall, overthrow, or defeat

Bouncenoun

Drugs.

Tumbleverb

do gymnastics, roll and turn skillfully

Bouncenoun

Swagger.

Bouncenoun

A 'good' beat.

Bouncenoun

A talent for leaping.

‘Them pro-ballers got bounce!’;

Bounceverb

To strike or thump, so as to rebound, or to make a sudden noise; a knock loudly.

‘Another bounces as hard as he can knock.’; ‘Against his bosom bounced his heaving heart.’;

Bounceverb

To leap or spring suddenly or unceremoniously; to bound; as, she bounced into the room.

‘Out bounced the mastiff.’; ‘Bounced off his arm+chair.’;

Bounceverb

To boast; to talk big; to bluster.

Bounceverb

To drive against anything suddenly and violently; to bump; to thump.

Bounceverb

To cause to bound or rebound; sometimes, to toss.

Bounceverb

To eject violently, as from a room; to discharge unceremoniously, as from employment.

Bounceverb

To bully; to scold.

Bouncenoun

A sudden leap or bound; a rebound.

Bouncenoun

A heavy, sudden, and often noisy, blow or thump.

‘The bounce burst open the door.’;

Bouncenoun

An explosion, or the noise of one.

Bouncenoun

Bluster; brag; untruthful boasting; audacious exaggeration; an impudent lie; a bouncer.

Bouncenoun

A dogfish of Europe (Scyllium catulus).

Bounceadverb

With a sudden leap; suddenly.

‘This impudent puppy comes bounce in upon me.’;

Bouncenoun

the quality of a substance that is able to rebound

Bouncenoun

a light springing movement upwards or forwards

Bouncenoun

rebounding from an impact (or series of impacts)

Bounceverb

spring back; spring away from an impact;

‘The rubber ball bounced’; ‘These particles do not resile but they unite after they collide’;

Bounceverb

hit something so that it bounces;

‘bounce a ball’;

Bounceverb

move up and down repeatedly

Bounceverb

come back after being refused;

‘the check bounced’;

Bounceverb

leap suddenly;

‘He bounced to his feet’;

Bounceverb

refuse to accept and send back;

‘bounce a check’;

Bounceverb

eject from the premises;

‘The ex-boxer's job is to bounce people who want to enter this private club’;

Bounceverb

(with reference to an object, especially a ball) move quickly up, back, or away from a surface after hitting it

‘he was bouncing the ball against the wall’; ‘the ball bounced away and he chased it’;

Bounceverb

(of light, sound, or an electronic signal) come into contact with an object or surface and be reflected back

‘short sound waves bounce off even small objects’;

Bounceverb

(of an email) be returned to its sender after failing to reach its destination

‘I tried to email him, but the message bounced’;

Bounceverb

recover well after a setback or problem

‘the savings rate has already started to bounce back and is sure to rise further’;

Bounceverb

come into sudden forceful contact with; collide with

‘people cross the road as slowly as possible, as if daring the cars to bounce them’;

Bounceverb

jump repeatedly up and down, typically on something springy

‘Emma was happily bouncing up and down on the mattress’;

Bounceverb

move up and down repeatedly

‘the gangplank bounced under his confident step’;

Bounceverb

cause (a child) to move lightly up and down on one's knee as a game

‘I remember how you used to bounce me on your knee’;

Bounceverb

(of a vehicle) move jerkily along a bumpy surface

‘the car bounced down the narrow track’;

Bounceverb

move in a particular direction in an energetic, happy, or enthusiastic manner

‘Linda bounced in through the open front door’;

Bounceverb

(of a cheque) be returned by a bank to the payee when there are not enough funds in the drawer's account to meet it

‘a further two cheques of £160 also bounced’;

Bounceverb

(of a bank) return a cheque to the payee when there are not enough funds in the drawer's account to meet it

‘the bank bounced the cheque’;

Bounceverb

eject (a troublemaker) forcibly from a nightclub or similar establishment.

Bounceverb

dismiss (someone) from a job

‘those who put in a dismal performance will be bounced from the tour’;

Bounceverb

pressurize (someone) into doing something, typically by presenting them with a fait accompli

‘the government should beware being bounced into any ill-considered foreign gamble’;

Bouncenoun

a rebound of a ball or other object

‘the wicket was causing the occasional erratic bounce’;

Bouncenoun

the ability of a surface to make a ball rebound in a specified way

‘a pitch of low bounce’;

Bouncenoun

a collision.

Bouncenoun

an act of jumping or of moving up and down jerkily

‘every bounce of the truck brought them into fresh contact’;

Bouncenoun

a sudden rise in the level of something

‘economists agree that there could be a bounce in prices next year’;

Bouncenoun

exuberant self-confidence

‘the bounce was now back in Jenny's step’;

Bouncenoun

health and body in a person's hair

‘use conditioner to help hair regain its bounce’;

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