VS.

Bounce vs. Spring

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Bounceverb

(intransitive) To change the direction of motion after hitting an obstacle.

‘The tennis ball bounced off the wall before coming to rest in the ditch.’;

Springverb

To jump or leap.

‘He sprang up from his seat.’;

Bounceverb

(intransitive) To move quickly up and then down, or vice versa, once or repeatedly.

‘He bounces nervously on his chair.’;

Springverb

To pass over by leaping.

Bounceverb

(transitive) To cause to move quickly up and down, or back and forth, once or repeatedly.

‘He bounced the child on his knee.’; ‘The children were bouncing a ball against a wall.’;

Springverb

To produce or disclose unexpectedly, especially of surprises, traps, etc.

Bounceverb

To suggest or introduce (an idea, etc.) to (off or by) somebody, in order to gain feedback.

‘I'm meeting Bob later to bounce some ideas off him about the new product range.’;

Springverb

(slang) To release or set free, especially from prison.

Bounceverb

(intransitive) To leap or spring suddenly or unceremoniously; to bound.

‘She bounced happily into the room.’;

Springverb

To suddenly catch someone doing something illegal or against the rules.

Bounceverb

To move rapidly (between).

Springverb

To come into being, often quickly or sharply.

‘Trees are already springing up in the plantation.’;

Bounceverb

To be refused by a bank because it is drawn on insufficient funds.

‘We can’t accept further checks from you, as your last one bounced.’;

Springverb

To start or rise suddenly, as from a covert.

Bounceverb

To fail to cover have sufficient funds for (a draft presented against one's account).

‘He tends to bounce a check or two toward the end of each month, before his payday.’;

Springverb

To cause to spring up; to start or rouse, as game; to cause to rise from the earth, or from a covert.

‘to spring a pheasant’;

Bounceverb

To leave.

‘Let’s wrap this up, I gotta bounce.’;

Springverb

(nautical) To crack or split; to bend or strain so as to weaken.

‘to spring a mast or a yard’;

Bounceverb

To eject violently, as from a room; to discharge unceremoniously, as from employment.

Springverb

To bend by force, as something stiff or strong; to force or put by bending, as a beam into its sockets, and allowing it to straighten when in place; often with in, out, etc.

‘to spring in a slat or a bar’;

Bounceverb

(sometimes employing the preposition with) To have sexual intercourse.

Springverb

To issue with speed and violence; to move with activity; to dart; to shoot.

Bounceverb

To attack unexpectedly.

‘The squadron was bounced north of the town.’;

Springverb

To move suddenly when pressure is released.

‘A bow, when bent, springs back by its elastic power.’;

Bounceverb

To turn power off and back on; to reset

‘See if it helps to bounce the router.’;

Springverb

(intransitive) To bend from a straight direction or plane surface; to become warped.

‘A piece of timber, or a plank, sometimes springs in seasoning.’;

Bounceverb

To return undelivered.

‘What’s your new email address? The old one bounces.’; ‘The girl in the bar told me her address was [email protected], but my mail to that address bounced back to me.’;

Springverb

To shoot up, out, or forth; to come to the light; to begin to appear; to emerge, like a plant from its seed, a stream from its source, etc.; often followed by up, forth, or out.

Bounceverb

To land hard and lift off again due to excess momentum.

‘The student pilot bounced several times during his landing.’;

Springverb

To issue or proceed, as from a parent or ancestor; to result, as from a cause, motive, reason, or principle.

Bounceverb

To land hard at unsurvivable velocity with fatal results.

‘After the mid-air collision, his rig failed and he bounced. BSBD.’;

Springverb

(obsolete) To grow; to prosper.

Bounceverb

To mix (two or more tracks of a multi-track audio tape recording) and record the result onto a single track, in order to free up tracks for further material to be added.

‘Bounce tracks two and three to track four, then record the cowbell on track two.’;

Springverb

To build (an arch).

‘They sprung an arch over the lintel.’;

Bounceverb

To bully; to scold.

Springverb

To sound (a rattle, such as a watchman's rattle).

Bounceverb

(archaic) To strike or thump, so as to rebound, or to make a sudden noise; to knock loudly.

Springnoun

A leap; a bound; a jump.

Bounceverb

(archaic) To boast; to bluster.

Springnoun

(countable) Traditionally the first of the four seasons of the year in temperate regions, in which plants spring from the ground and trees come into blossom, following winter and preceding summer.

‘Spring is the time of the year most species reproduce.’; ‘I spent my spring holidays in Morocco.’; ‘You can visit me in the spring, when the weather is bearable.’;

Bouncenoun

A change of direction of motion after hitting the ground or an obstacle.

Springnoun

(countable) Meteorologically, the months of March, April and May in the northern hemisphere or September, October and November in the southern.

Bouncenoun

A movement up and then down (or vice versa), once or repeatedly.

Springnoun

(countable) The astronomically delineated period from the moment of vernal equinox, approximately March 21 in the northern hemisphere to the moment of the summer solstice, approximately June 21. (See Spring (season) for other variations.)

Bouncenoun

An email return with any error.

Springnoun

(countable) Spring tide; a tide of greater-than-average range, that is, around the first or third quarter of a lunar month, or around the times of the new or full moon.

Bouncenoun

The sack, licensing.

Springnoun

(countable) A place where water or oil emerges from the ground.

‘This water is bottled from the spring of the river.’;

Bouncenoun

A bang, boom.

Springnoun

(uncountable) The property of a body of springing to its original form after being compressed, stretched, etc.

‘the spring of a bow’;

Bouncenoun

A drink based on brandyW.

Springnoun

Elastic power or force.

Bouncenoun

A heavy, sudden, and often noisy, blow or thump.

Springnoun

(countable) A mechanical device made of flexible or coiled material that exerts force when it is bent, compressed or stretched.

‘We jumped so hard the bed springs broke.’;

Bouncenoun

Bluster; brag; untruthful boasting; audacious exaggeration; an impudent lie; a bouncer.

Springnoun

An erection of the penis.

Bouncenoun

Scyllium catulus, a European dogfish.

Springnoun

(countable) The source of an action or of a supply.

Bouncenoun

A genre of New Orleans music.

Springnoun

Any active power; that by which action, or motion, is produced or propagated; cause; origin; motive.

Bouncenoun

Drugs.

Springnoun

That which springs, or is originated, from a source.

Bouncenoun

Swagger.

Springnoun

A race; lineage.

Bouncenoun

A 'good' beat.

Springnoun

A youth; a springald.

Bouncenoun

A talent for leaping.

‘Them pro-ballers got bounce!’;

Springnoun

A shoot; a plant; a young tree; also, a grove of trees; woodland.

Bounceverb

To strike or thump, so as to rebound, or to make a sudden noise; a knock loudly.

‘Another bounces as hard as he can knock.’; ‘Against his bosom bounced his heaving heart.’;

Springnoun

(obsolete) That which causes one to spring; specifically, a lively tune.

Bounceverb

To leap or spring suddenly or unceremoniously; to bound; as, she bounced into the room.

‘Out bounced the mastiff.’; ‘Bounced off his arm+chair.’;

Springnoun

The time of growth and progress; early portion; first stage.

Bounceverb

To boast; to talk big; to bluster.

Springnoun

A rope attaching the bow of a vessel to the stern-side of the jetty, or vice versa, to stop the vessel from surging.

‘You should put a couple of springs onto the jetty to stop the boat moving so much.’;

Bounceverb

To drive against anything suddenly and violently; to bump; to thump.

Springnoun

(nautical) A line led from a vessel's quarter to her cable so that by tightening or slacking it she can be made to lie in any desired position; a line led diagonally from the bow or stern of a vessel to some point upon the wharf to which she is moored.

Bounceverb

To cause to bound or rebound; sometimes, to toss.

Springnoun

(nautical) A crack or fissure in a mast or yard, running obliquely or transversely.

Bounceverb

To eject violently, as from a room; to discharge unceremoniously, as from employment.

Springverb

To leap; to bound; to jump.

‘The mountain stag that springsFrom height to height, and bounds along the plains.’;

Bounceverb

To bully; to scold.

Springverb

To issue with speed and violence; to move with activity; to dart; to shoot.

‘And sudden lightSprung through the vaulted roof.’;

Bouncenoun

A sudden leap or bound; a rebound.

Springverb

To start or rise suddenly, as from a covert.

‘Watchful as fowlers when their game will spring.’;

Bouncenoun

A heavy, sudden, and often noisy, blow or thump.

‘The bounce burst open the door.’;

Springverb

To fly back; as, a bow, when bent, springs back by its elastic power.

Bouncenoun

An explosion, or the noise of one.

Springverb

To bend from a straight direction or plane surface; to become warped; as, a piece of timber, or a plank, sometimes springs in seasoning.

Bouncenoun

Bluster; brag; untruthful boasting; audacious exaggeration; an impudent lie; a bouncer.

Springverb

To shoot up, out, or forth; to come to the light; to begin to appear; to emerge; as a plant from its seed, as streams from their source, and the like; - often followed by up, forth, or out.

‘Till well nigh the day began to spring.’; ‘To satisfy the desolate and waste ground, and to cause the bud of the tender herb to spring forth.’; ‘Do not blast my springing hopes.’; ‘O, spring to light; auspicious Babe, be born.’;

Bouncenoun

A dogfish of Europe (Scyllium catulus).

Springverb

To issue or proceed, as from a parent or ancestor; to result, as from a cause, motive, reason, or principle.

‘[They found] new hope to springOut of despair, joy, but with fear yet linked.’;

Bounceadverb

With a sudden leap; suddenly.

‘This impudent puppy comes bounce in upon me.’;

Springverb

To grow; to thrive; to prosper.

‘What makes all this, but Jupiter the king,At whose command we perish, and we spring?’;

Bouncenoun

the quality of a substance that is able to rebound

Springverb

To cause to spring up; to start or rouse, as game; to cause to rise from the earth, or from a covert; as, to spring a pheasant.

Bouncenoun

a light springing movement upwards or forwards

Springverb

To produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly; as, to spring a surprise on someone; to spring a joke.

‘She starts, and leaves her bed, and springs a light.’; ‘The friends to the cause sprang a new project.’;

Bouncenoun

rebounding from an impact (or series of impacts)

Springverb

To cause to explode; as, to spring a mine.

Bounceverb

spring back; spring away from an impact;

‘The rubber ball bounced’; ‘These particles do not resile but they unite after they collide’;

Springverb

To crack or split; to bend or strain so as to weaken; as, to spring a mast or a yard.

Bounceverb

hit something so that it bounces;

‘bounce a ball’;

Springverb

To cause to close suddenly, as the parts of a trap operated by a spring; as, to spring a trap.

Bounceverb

move up and down repeatedly

Springverb

To bend by force, as something stiff or strong; to force or put by bending, as a beam into its sockets, and allowing it to straighten when in place; - often with in, out, etc.; as, to spring in a slat or a bar.

Bounceverb

come back after being refused;

‘the check bounced’;

Springverb

To pass over by leaping; as, to spring a fence.

Bounceverb

leap suddenly;

‘He bounced to his feet’;

Springverb

To release (a person) from confinement, especially from a prison.

Bounceverb

refuse to accept and send back;

‘bounce a check’;

Springnoun

A leap; a bound; a jump.

‘The prisoner, with a spring, from prison broke.’;

Bounceverb

eject from the premises;

‘The ex-boxer's job is to bounce people who want to enter this private club’;

Springnoun

A flying back; the resilience of a body recovering its former state by its elasticity; as, the spring of a bow.

Bounceverb

(with reference to an object, especially a ball) move quickly up, back, or away from a surface after hitting it

‘he was bouncing the ball against the wall’; ‘the ball bounced away and he chased it’;

Springnoun

Elastic power or force.

‘Heavens! what a spring was in his arm!’;

Bounceverb

(of light, sound, or an electronic signal) come into contact with an object or surface and be reflected back

‘short sound waves bounce off even small objects’;

Springnoun

An elastic body of any kind, as steel, India rubber, tough wood, or compressed air, used for various mechanical purposes, as receiving and imparting power, diminishing concussion, regulating motion, measuring weight or other force.

Bounceverb

(of an email) be returned to its sender after failing to reach its destination

‘I tried to email him, but the message bounced’;

Springnoun

Any source of supply; especially, the source from which a stream proceeds; an issue of water from the earth; a natural fountain.

Bounceverb

recover well after a setback or problem

‘the savings rate has already started to bounce back and is sure to rise further’;

Springnoun

Any active power; that by which action, or motion, is produced or propagated; cause; origin; motive.

‘Our author shuns by vulgar springs to moveThe hero's glory, or the virgin's love.’;

Bounceverb

come into sudden forceful contact with; collide with

‘people cross the road as slowly as possible, as if daring the cars to bounce them’;

Springnoun

That which springs, or is originated, from a source;

Bounceverb

jump repeatedly up and down, typically on something springy

‘Emma was happily bouncing up and down on the mattress’;

Springnoun

That which causes one to spring; specifically, a lively tune.

Bounceverb

move up and down repeatedly

‘the gangplank bounced under his confident step’;

Springnoun

The season of the year when plants begin to vegetate and grow; the vernal season, usually comprehending the months of March, April, and May, in the middle latitudes north of the equator.

Bounceverb

cause (a child) to move lightly up and down on one's knee as a game

‘I remember how you used to bounce me on your knee’;

Springnoun

The time of growth and progress; early portion; first stage; as, the spring of life.

‘O how this spring of love resemblethThe uncertain glory of an April day.’;

Bounceverb

(of a vehicle) move jerkily along a bumpy surface

‘the car bounced down the narrow track’;

Springnoun

A crack or fissure in a mast or yard, running obliquely or transversely.

Bounceverb

move in a particular direction in an energetic, happy, or enthusiastic manner

‘Linda bounced in through the open front door’;

Springnoun

the season of growth;

‘the emerging buds were a sure sign of spring’; ‘he will hold office until the spring of next year’;

Bounceverb

(of a cheque) be returned by a bank to the payee when there are not enough funds in the drawer's account to meet it

‘a further two cheques of £160 also bounced’;

Springnoun

a natural flow of ground water

Bounceverb

(of a bank) return a cheque to the payee when there are not enough funds in the drawer's account to meet it

‘the bank bounced the cheque’;

Springnoun

a metal elastic device that returns to its shape or position when pushed or pulled or pressed;

‘the spring was broken’;

Bounceverb

eject (a troublemaker) forcibly from a nightclub or similar establishment.

Springnoun

a light springing movement upwards or forwards

Bounceverb

dismiss (someone) from a job

‘those who put in a dismal performance will be bounced from the tour’;

Springnoun

the elasticity of something that can be stretched and returns to its original length

Bounceverb

pressurize (someone) into doing something, typically by presenting them with a fait accompli

‘the government should beware being bounced into any ill-considered foreign gamble’;

Springnoun

a point at which water issues forth

Bouncenoun

a rebound of a ball or other object

‘the wicket was causing the occasional erratic bounce’;

Springverb

move forward by leaps and bounds;

‘The horse bounded across the meadow’; ‘The child leapt across the puddle’; ‘Can you jump over the fence?’;

Bouncenoun

the ability of a surface to make a ball rebound in a specified way

‘a pitch of low bounce’;

Springverb

develop into a distinctive entity;

‘our plans began to take shape’;

Bouncenoun

a collision.

Springverb

spring back; spring away from an impact;

‘The rubber ball bounced’; ‘These particles do not resile but they unite after they collide’;

Bouncenoun

an act of jumping or of moving up and down jerkily

‘every bounce of the truck brought them into fresh contact’;

Springverb

produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly;

‘He sprang a new haircut on his wife’;

Bouncenoun

a sudden rise in the level of something

‘economists agree that there could be a bounce in prices next year’;

Springverb

develop suddenly;

‘The tire sprang a leak’;

Bouncenoun

exuberant self-confidence

‘the bounce was now back in Jenny's step’;

Springverb

produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly;

‘He sprang these news on me just as I was leaving’;

Bouncenoun

health and body in a person's hair

‘use conditioner to help hair regain its bounce’;

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