VS.

Bounce vs. Shake

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  • Bounce (verb)

    To change the direction of motion after hitting an obstacle.

    "The tennis ball bounced off the wall before coming to rest in the ditch."

  • Bounce (verb)

    To move quickly up and then down, or vice versa, once or repeatedly.

    "He bounces nervously on his chair."

  • Bounce (verb)

    To cause to move quickly up and down, or back and forth, once or repeatedly.

    "He bounced the child on his knee."

    "The children were bouncing a ball against a wall."

  • Bounce (verb)

    To suggest or introduce (an idea, etc.) to (off or by) somebody, in order to gain feedback.

    "I'm meeting Bob later to bounce some ideas off him about the new product range."

  • Bounce (verb)

    To leap or spring suddenly or unceremoniously; to bound.

    "She bounced happily into the room."

  • Bounce (verb)

    To move rapidly (between).

  • Bounce (verb)

    To be refused by a bank because it is drawn on insufficient funds.

    "We can’t accept further checks from you, as your last one bounced."

  • Bounce (verb)

    To fail to cover have sufficient funds for (a draft presented against one's account).

    "He tends to bounce a check or two toward the end of each month, before his payday."

  • Bounce (verb)

    To leave.

    "Let’s wrap this up, I gotta bounce."

  • Bounce (verb)

    To eject violently, as from a room; to discharge unceremoniously, as from employment.

  • Bounce (verb)

    (sometimes employing the preposition with) To have sexual intercourse.

  • Bounce (verb)

    To attack unexpectedly.

    "The squadron was bounced north of the town."

  • Bounce (verb)

    To turn power off and back on; to reset

    "See if it helps to bounce the router."

  • Bounce (verb)

    To return undelivered.

    "What’s your new email address? The old one bounces."

    "The girl in the bar told me her address was [email protected], but my mail to that address bounced back to me."

  • Bounce (verb)

    To land hard and lift off again due to excess momentum.

    "The student pilot bounced several times during his landing."

  • Bounce (verb)

    To land hard at unsurvivable velocity with fatal results.

    "After the mid-air collision, his rig failed and he bounced. BSBD."

  • Bounce (verb)

    To mix (two or more tracks of a multi-track audio tape recording) and record the result onto a single track, in order to free up tracks for further material to be added.

    "Bounce tracks two and three to track four, then record the cowbell on track two."

  • Bounce (verb)

    To bully; to scold.

  • Bounce (verb)

    To strike or thump, so as to rebound, or to make a sudden noise; to knock loudly.

  • Bounce (verb)

    To boast; to bluster.

  • Bounce (noun)

    A change of direction of motion after hitting the ground or an obstacle.

  • Bounce (noun)

    A movement up and then down (or vice versa), once or repeatedly.

  • Bounce (noun)

    An email return with any error.

  • Bounce (noun)

    The sack, licensing.

  • Bounce (noun)

    A bang, boom.

  • Bounce (noun)

    A drink based on brandyW.

  • Bounce (noun)

    A heavy, sudden, and often noisy, blow or thump.

  • Bounce (noun)

    Bluster; brag; untruthful boasting; audacious exaggeration; an impudent lie; a bouncer.

  • Bounce (noun)

    Scyllium catulus, a European dogfish.

  • Bounce (noun)

    A genre of New Orleans music.

  • Bounce (noun)

    Drugs.

  • Bounce (noun)

    Swagger.

  • Bounce (noun)

    A 'good' beat.

  • Bounce (noun)

    A leaping.

    "Them pro-ballers got bounce!"

  • Shake (verb)

    To cause (something) to move rapidly in opposite directions alternatingly.

    "The earthquake shook the building."

    "He shook the can of soda for thirty seconds before delivering it to me, so that, when I popped it open, soda went everywhere."

  • Shake (verb)

    To move (one's head) from side to side, especially to indicate refusal, reluctance{{,}} or disapproval.

    "Shaking his head, he kept repeating "No, no, no"."

  • Shake (verb)

    To move or remove by agitating; to throw off by a jolting or vibrating motion.

    "to shake fruit down from a tree"

  • Shake (verb)

    To disturb emotionally; to shock.

    "traumatize"

    "Her father's death shook her terribly."

    "He was shaken by what had happened."

  • Shake (verb)

    To lose, evade, or get rid of (something).

    "I can't shake the feeling that I forgot something."

  • Shake (verb)

    To move from side to side.

    "shiver|tremble"

    "She shook with grief."

  • Shake (verb)

    To shake hands.

    "OK, let's shake on it."

  • Shake (verb)

    To dance.

    "She was shaking it on the dance floor."

  • Shake (verb)

    To give a tremulous tone to; to trill.

    "to shake a note in music"

  • Shake (verb)

    To threaten to overthrow.

    "The experience shook my religious belief."

  • Shake (verb)

    To be agitated; to lose firmness.

  • Shake (noun)

    The act of shaking or being shaken; tremulous or back-and-forth motion.

    "The cat gave the mouse a shake."

    "She replied in the negative, with a shake of her head."

  • Shake (noun)

    A milkshake.

  • Shake (noun)

    A beverage made by adding ice cream to a (usually carbonated) drink; a float.

  • Shake (noun)

    Shake cannabis, small, leafy fragments of cannabis that gather at the bottom of a bag of marijuana.

  • Shake (noun)

    A thin shingle.

  • Shake (noun)

    A crack or split between the growth rings in wood.

  • Shake (noun)

    A fissure in rock or earth.

  • Shake (noun)

    A basic wooden shingle made from split logs, traditionally used for roofing etc.

  • Shake (noun)

    Instant, second. (Especially in two shakes.)

  • Shake (noun)

    One of the staves of a hogshead or barrel taken apart.

  • Shake (noun)

    A rapid alternation of a principal tone with another represented on the next degree of the staff above or below it; a trill.

  • Shake (noun)

    A shook of staves and headings.

  • Shake (noun)

    The redshank, so called from the nodding of its head while on the ground.

Wiktionary
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  • Bounce (verb)

    (with reference to an object, especially a ball) move quickly up, back, or away from a surface after hitting it

    "he was bouncing the ball against the wall"

    "the ball bounced away and he chased it"

  • Bounce (verb)

    (of light, sound, or an electronic signal) come into contact with an object or surface and be reflected back

    "short sound waves bounce off even small objects"

  • Bounce (verb)

    (of an email) be returned to its sender after failing to reach its destination

    "I tried to email him, but the message bounced"

  • Bounce (verb)

    recover well after a setback or problem

    "the savings rate has already started to bounce back and is sure to rise further"

  • Bounce (verb)

    come into sudden forceful contact with; collide with

    "people cross the road as slowly as possible, as if daring the cars to bounce them"

  • Bounce (verb)

    jump repeatedly up and down, typically on something springy

    "Emma was happily bouncing up and down on the mattress"

  • Bounce (verb)

    move up and down repeatedly

    "the gangplank bounced under his confident step"

  • Bounce (verb)

    cause (a child) to move lightly up and down on one's knee as a game

    "I remember how you used to bounce me on your knee"

  • Bounce (verb)

    (of a vehicle) move jerkily along a bumpy surface

    "the car bounced down the narrow track"

  • Bounce (verb)

    move in a particular direction in an energetic, happy, or enthusiastic manner

    "Linda bounced in through the open front door"

  • Bounce (verb)

    (of a cheque) be returned by a bank to the payee when there are not enough funds in the drawer's account to meet it

    "a further two cheques of £160 also bounced"

  • Bounce (verb)

    (of a bank) return a cheque to the payee when there are not enough funds in the drawer's account to meet it

    "the bank bounced the cheque"

  • Bounce (verb)

    eject (a troublemaker) forcibly from a nightclub or similar establishment.

  • Bounce (verb)

    dismiss (someone) from a job

    "those who put in a dismal performance will be bounced from the tour"

  • Bounce (verb)

    pressurize (someone) into doing something, typically by presenting them with a fait accompli

    "the government should beware being bounced into any ill-considered foreign gamble"

  • Bounce (noun)

    a rebound of a ball or other object

    "the wicket was causing the occasional erratic bounce"

  • Bounce (noun)

    the ability of a surface to make a ball rebound in a specified way

    "a pitch of low bounce"

  • Bounce (noun)

    a collision.

  • Bounce (noun)

    an act of jumping or of moving up and down jerkily

    "every bounce of the truck brought them into fresh contact"

  • Bounce (noun)

    a sudden rise in the level of something

    "economists agree that there could be a bounce in prices next year"

  • Bounce (noun)

    exuberant self-confidence

    "the bounce was now back in Jenny's step"

  • Bounce (noun)

    health and body in a person's hair

    "use conditioner to help hair regain its bounce"

  • Shake (verb)

    (of a structure or area of land) tremble or vibrate

    "buildings shook in Sacramento and tremors were felt in Reno"

  • Shake (verb)

    cause to tremble or vibrate

    "a severe earthquake shook the area"

  • Shake (verb)

    (of a person, part of the body, or the voice) tremble uncontrollably from a strong emotion

    "Luke was shaking with rage"

    "her voice shook with passion"

  • Shake (verb)

    move (an object) up and down or from side to side with rapid, forceful, jerky movements

    "she stood in the hall and shook her umbrella"

  • Shake (verb)

    remove (an object or substance) from something by movements of this kind

    "they shook the sand out of their shoes"

  • Shake (verb)

    grasp (someone) and move them roughly to and fro, either in anger or to rouse them from sleep

    "he gently shook the driver awake and they set off"

  • Shake (verb)

    brandish in anger or as a warning; make a threatening gesture with

    "men shook their fists and shouted"

  • Shake (verb)

    get rid of or put an end to

    "I couldn't shake the feeling that everyone was laughing at me"

  • Shake (verb)

    upset the composure or confidence of; shock or astonish

    "the boy was visibly shaken"

    "rumours of a further loss shook the market"

  • Shake (verb)

    cause a change of mood or attitude by shocking or disturbing (someone)

    "if the bombing cannot shake the government out of its complacency, what will?"

  • Shake (noun)

    an act of shaking

    "she gave her red curls a vehement shake"

  • Shake (noun)

    an amount of something that is sprinkled by shaking a container

    "add a few shakes of sea salt and black pepper"

  • Shake (noun)

    a fit of trembling or shivering

    "I wouldn't go in there, it gives me the shakes"

  • Shake (noun)

    short for milkshake

  • Shake (noun)

    an earth tremor.

  • Shake (noun)

    a trill.

  • Shake (noun)

    a kind of rough wooden shingle, used especially on rustic buildings

    "cedar shakes"

Oxford Dictionary
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  • Bounce (verb)

    To strike or thump, so as to rebound, or to make a sudden noise; a knock loudly.

  • Bounce (verb)

    To leap or spring suddenly or unceremoniously; to bound; as, she bounced into the room.

  • Bounce (verb)

    To boast; to talk big; to bluster.

  • Bounce

    To drive against anything suddenly and violently; to bump; to thump.

  • Bounce

    To cause to bound or rebound; sometimes, to toss.

  • Bounce

    To eject violently, as from a room; to discharge unceremoniously, as from employment.

  • Bounce

    To bully; to scold.

  • Bounce (noun)

    A sudden leap or bound; a rebound.

  • Bounce (noun)

    A heavy, sudden, and often noisy, blow or thump.

  • Bounce (noun)

    An explosion, or the noise of one.

  • Bounce (noun)

    Bluster; brag; untruthful boasting; audacious exaggeration; an impudent lie; a bouncer.

  • Bounce (noun)

    A dogfish of Europe (Scyllium catulus).

  • Bounce (adverb)

    With a sudden leap; suddenly.

  • Shake

    obs. p. p. of Shake.

  • Shake

    To cause to move with quick or violent vibrations; to move rapidly one way and the other; to make to tremble or shiver; to agitate.

  • Shake

    Fig.: To move from firmness; to weaken the stability of; to cause to waver; to impair the resolution of.

  • Shake

    To give a tremulous tone to; to trill; as, to shake a note in music.

  • Shake

    To move or remove by agitating; to throw off by a jolting or vibrating motion; to rid one's self of; - generally with an adverb, as off, out, etc.; as, to shake fruit down from a tree.

  • Shake (verb)

    To be agitated with a waving or vibratory motion; to tremble; to shiver; to quake; to totter.

  • Shake (noun)

    The act or result of shaking; a vacillating or wavering motion; a rapid motion one way and other; a trembling, quaking, or shivering; agitation.

  • Shake (noun)

    A fissure or crack in timber, caused by its being dried too suddenly.

  • Shake (noun)

    A fissure in rock or earth.

  • Shake (noun)

    A rapid alternation of a principal tone with another represented on the next degree of the staff above or below it; a trill.

  • Shake (noun)

    One of the staves of a hogshead or barrel taken apart.

  • Shake (noun)

    A shook of staves and headings.

  • Shake (noun)

    The redshank; - so called from the nodding of its head while on the ground.

Webster Dictionary
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  • Bounce (noun)

    the quality of a substance that is able to rebound

  • Bounce (noun)

    a light springing movement upwards or forwards

  • Bounce (noun)

    rebounding from an impact (or series of impacts)

  • Bounce (verb)

    spring back; spring away from an impact;

    "The rubber ball bounced"

    "These particles do not resile but they unite after they collide"

  • Bounce (verb)

    hit something so that it bounces;

    "bounce a ball"

  • Bounce (verb)

    move up and down repeatedly

  • Bounce (verb)

    come back after being refused;

    "the check bounced"

  • Bounce (verb)

    leap suddenly;

    "He bounced to his feet"

  • Bounce (verb)

    refuse to accept and send back;

    "bounce a check"

  • Bounce (verb)

    eject from the premises;

    "The ex-boxer's job is to bounce people who want to enter this private club"

  • Shake (noun)

    building material used as siding or roofing

  • Shake (noun)

    frothy drink of milk and flavoring and sometimes fruit or ice cream

  • Shake (noun)

    a note that alternates rapidly with another note a semitone above it

  • Shake (noun)

    grasping and shaking a person's hand (as to acknowledge an introduction or to agree on a contract)

  • Shake (noun)

    reflex shaking caused by cold or fear or excitement

  • Shake (noun)

    causing to move repeatedly from side to side

  • Shake (verb)

    move or cause to move back and forth;

    "The chemist shook the flask vigorously"

    "My hands were shaking"

  • Shake (verb)

    move with or as if with a tremor;

    "his hands shook"

  • Shake (verb)

    shake or vibrate rapidly and intensively;

    "The old engine was juddering"

  • Shake (verb)

    move back and forth or sideways;

    "the ship was rocking"

    "the tall building swayed"

    "She rocked back and forth on her feet"

  • Shake (verb)

    undermine or cause to waver;

    "my faith has been shaken"

    "The bad news shook her hopes"

  • Shake (verb)

    stir the feelings, emotions, or peace of;

    "These stories shook the community"

    "the civil war shook the country"

  • Shake (verb)

    get rid of;

    "I couldn't shake the car that was following me"

  • Shake (verb)

    bring to a specified condition by or as if by shaking;

    "He was shaken from his dreams"

    "shake the salt out of the salt shaker"

  • Shake (verb)

    shake (a body part) to communicate a greeting, feeling, or cognitive state;

    "shake one's head"

    "She shook her finger at the naughty students"

    "The old enemies shook hands"

    "Don't shake your fist at me!"

Princeton's WordNet

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