VS.

Bounce vs. Bound

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Bounceverb

(intransitive) To change the direction of motion after hitting an obstacle.

‘The tennis ball bounced off the wall before coming to rest in the ditch.’;

Boundverb

simple past tense and past participle of bind

‘I bound the splint to my leg.’; ‘I had bound the splint with duct tape.’;

Bounceverb

(intransitive) To move quickly up and then down, or vice versa, once or repeatedly.

‘He bounces nervously on his chair.’;

Boundverb

To surround a territory or other geographical entity.

‘France, Portugal, Gibraltar and Andorra bound Spain.’; ‘Kansas is bounded by Nebraska on the north, Missouri on the east, Oklahoma on the south and Colorado on the west.’;

Bounceverb

(transitive) To cause to move quickly up and down, or back and forth, once or repeatedly.

‘He bounced the child on his knee.’; ‘The children were bouncing a ball against a wall.’;

Boundverb

(mathematics) To be the boundary of.

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Bounceverb

To suggest or introduce (an idea, etc.) to (off or by) somebody, in order to gain feedback.

‘I'm meeting Bob later to bounce some ideas off him about the new product range.’;

Boundverb

(intransitive) To leap, move by jumping.

‘The rabbit bounded down the lane.’;

Bounceverb

(intransitive) To leap or spring suddenly or unceremoniously; to bound.

‘She bounced happily into the room.’;

Boundverb

(transitive) To cause to leap.

‘to bound a horse’;

Bounceverb

To move rapidly (between).

Boundverb

To rebound; to bounce.

‘a rubber ball bounds on the floor’;

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Bounceverb

To be refused by a bank because it is drawn on insufficient funds.

‘We can’t accept further checks from you, as your last one bounced.’;

Boundverb

To cause to rebound; to throw so that it will rebound; to bounce.

‘to bound a ball on the floor''’;

Bounceverb

To fail to cover have sufficient funds for (a draft presented against one's account).

‘He tends to bounce a check or two toward the end of each month, before his payday.’;

Boundadjective

(with infinitive) Obliged (to).

‘You are not legally bound to reply.’;

Bounceverb

To leave.

‘Let’s wrap this up, I gotta bounce.’;

Boundadjective

(with infinitive) Very likely (to), certain to

‘They were bound to come into conflict eventually.’;

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Bounceverb

To eject violently, as from a room; to discharge unceremoniously, as from employment.

Boundadjective

That cannot stand alone as a free word.

Bounceverb

(sometimes employing the preposition with) To have sexual intercourse.

Boundadjective

Constrained by a quantifier.

Bounceverb

To attack unexpectedly.

‘The squadron was bounced north of the town.’;

Boundadjective

(dated) Constipated; costive.

Bounceverb

To turn power off and back on; to reset

‘See if it helps to bounce the router.’;

Boundadjective

Confined or restricted to a certain place; e.g. railbound.

Bounceverb

To return undelivered.

‘What’s your new email address? The old one bounces.’; ‘The girl in the bar told me her address was [email protected], but my mail to that address bounced back to me.’;

Boundadjective

Unable to move in certain conditions; e.g. snowbound.

Bounceverb

To land hard and lift off again due to excess momentum.

‘The student pilot bounced several times during his landing.’;

Boundadjective

(obsolete) Ready, prepared.

Bounceverb

To land hard at unsurvivable velocity with fatal results.

‘After the mid-air collision, his rig failed and he bounced. BSBD.’;

Boundadjective

Ready to start or go (to); moving in the direction (of).

‘Which way are you bound?’; ‘Is that message bound for me?’;

Bounceverb

To mix (two or more tracks of a multi-track audio tape recording) and record the result onto a single track, in order to free up tracks for further material to be added.

‘Bounce tracks two and three to track four, then record the cowbell on track two.’;

Boundnoun

A boundary, the border which one must cross in order to enter or leave a territory.

‘I reached the northern bound of my property, took a deep breath and walked on.’; ‘Somewhere within these bounds you may find a buried treasure.’;

Bounceverb

To bully; to scold.

Boundnoun

(mathematics) A value which is known to be greater or smaller than a given set of values.

Bounceverb

(archaic) To strike or thump, so as to rebound, or to make a sudden noise; to knock loudly.

Boundnoun

A sizeable jump, great leap.

‘The deer crossed the stream in a single bound.’;

Bounceverb

(archaic) To boast; to bluster.

Boundnoun

A spring from one foot to the other in dancing.

Bouncenoun

A change of direction of motion after hitting the ground or an obstacle.

Boundnoun

(dated) A bounce; a rebound.

‘the bound of a ball''’;

Bouncenoun

A movement up and then down (or vice versa), once or repeatedly.

Boundnoun

The external or limiting line, either real or imaginary, of any object or space; that which limits or restrains, or within which something is limited or restrained; limit; confine; extent; boundary.

‘He hath compassed the waters with bounds.’; ‘On earth's remotest bounds.’; ‘And mete the bounds of hate and love.’;

Bouncenoun

An email return with any error.

Boundnoun

A leap; an elastic spring; a jump.

‘A bound of graceful hardihood.’;

Bouncenoun

The sack, licensing.

Boundnoun

Rebound; as, the bound of a ball.

Bouncenoun

A bang, boom.

Boundnoun

Spring from one foot to the other.

Bouncenoun

A drink based on brandyW.

Boundverb

To limit; to terminate; to fix the furthest point of extension of; - said of natural or of moral objects; to lie along, or form, a boundary of; to inclose; to circumscribe; to restrain; to confine.

‘Where full measure only bounds excess.’; ‘Phlegethon . . .Whose fiery flood the burning empire bounds.’;

Bouncenoun

A heavy, sudden, and often noisy, blow or thump.

Boundverb

To name the boundaries of; as, to bound France.

Bouncenoun

Bluster; brag; untruthful boasting; audacious exaggeration; an impudent lie; a bouncer.

Boundverb

To move with a sudden spring or leap, or with a succession of springs or leaps; as the beast bounded from his den; the herd bounded across the plain.

‘Before his lord the ready spaniel bounds.’; ‘And the waves bound beneath me as a steedThat knows his rider.’;

Bouncenoun

Scyllium catulus, a European dogfish.

Boundverb

To rebound, as an elastic ball.

Bouncenoun

A genre of New Orleans music.

Boundverb

To make to bound or leap; as, to bound a horse.

Bouncenoun

Drugs.

Boundverb

To cause to rebound; to throw so that it will rebound; as, to bound a ball on the floor.

Bouncenoun

Swagger.

Bound

imp. & p. p. of Bind.

Bouncenoun

A 'good' beat.

Boundadjective

Restrained by a hand, rope, chain, fetters, or the like.

Bouncenoun

A talent for leaping.

‘Them pro-ballers got bounce!’;

Boundadjective

Inclosed in a binding or cover; as, a bound volume.

Bounceverb

To strike or thump, so as to rebound, or to make a sudden noise; a knock loudly.

‘Another bounces as hard as he can knock.’; ‘Against his bosom bounced his heaving heart.’;

Boundadjective

Under legal or moral restraint or obligation.

Bounceverb

To leap or spring suddenly or unceremoniously; to bound; as, she bounced into the room.

‘Out bounced the mastiff.’; ‘Bounced off his arm+chair.’;

Boundadjective

Constrained or compelled; destined; certain; - followed by the infinitive; as, he is bound to succeed; he is bound to fail.

Bounceverb

To boast; to talk big; to bluster.

Boundadjective

Resolved; as, I am bound to do it.

Bounceverb

To drive against anything suddenly and violently; to bump; to thump.

Boundadjective

Constipated; costive.

Bounceverb

To cause to bound or rebound; sometimes, to toss.

Boundadjective

Ready or intending to go; on the way toward; going; - with to or for, or with an adverb of motion; as, a ship is bound to Cadiz, or for Cadiz.

Bounceverb

To eject violently, as from a room; to discharge unceremoniously, as from employment.

Boundnoun

a line determining the limits of an area

Bounceverb

To bully; to scold.

Boundnoun

the line or plane indicating the limit or extent of something

Bouncenoun

A sudden leap or bound; a rebound.

Boundnoun

a light springing movement upwards or forwards

Bouncenoun

A heavy, sudden, and often noisy, blow or thump.

‘The bounce burst open the door.’;

Boundverb

move forward by leaps and bounds;

‘The horse bounded across the meadow’; ‘The child leapt across the puddle’; ‘Can you jump over the fence?’;

Bouncenoun

An explosion, or the noise of one.

Boundverb

form the boundary of; be contiguous to

Bouncenoun

Bluster; brag; untruthful boasting; audacious exaggeration; an impudent lie; a bouncer.

Boundverb

place limits on (extent or access);

‘restrict the use of this parking lot’; ‘limit the time you can spend with your friends’;

Bouncenoun

A dogfish of Europe (Scyllium catulus).

Boundverb

spring back; spring away from an impact;

‘The rubber ball bounced’; ‘These particles do not resile but they unite after they collide’;

Bounceadverb

With a sudden leap; suddenly.

‘This impudent puppy comes bounce in upon me.’;

Boundadjective

held with another element, substance or material in chemical or physical union

Bouncenoun

the quality of a substance that is able to rebound

Boundadjective

confined by bonds;

‘bound and gagged hostages’;

Bouncenoun

a light springing movement upwards or forwards

Boundadjective

secured with a cover or binding; often used as a combining form;

‘bound volumes’; ‘leather-bound volumes’;

Bouncenoun

rebounding from an impact (or series of impacts)

Boundadjective

(usually followed by `to') governed by fate;

‘bound to happen’; ‘an old house destined to be demolished’; ‘he is destined to be famous’;

Bounceverb

spring back; spring away from an impact;

‘The rubber ball bounced’; ‘These particles do not resile but they unite after they collide’;

Boundadjective

covered or wrapped with a bandage;

‘the bandaged wound on the back of his head’; ‘an injury bound in fresh gauze’;

Bounceverb

hit something so that it bounces;

‘bounce a ball’;

Boundadjective

headed or intending to head in a certain direction; often used as a combining form as in `college-bound students';

‘children bound for school’; ‘a flight destined for New York’;

Bounceverb

move up and down repeatedly

Boundadjective

bound by an oath;

‘a bound official’;

Bounceverb

come back after being refused;

‘the check bounced’;

Boundadjective

bound by contract

Bounceverb

leap suddenly;

‘He bounced to his feet’;

Boundadjective

confined in the bowels;

‘he is bound in the belly’;

Bounceverb

refuse to accept and send back;

‘bounce a check’;

Boundverb

walk or run with leaping strides

‘shares bounded ahead in early dealing’; ‘Louis came bounding down the stairs’;

Bounceverb

eject from the premises;

‘The ex-boxer's job is to bounce people who want to enter this private club’;

Boundverb

(of an object) rebound from a surface

‘bullets bounded off the veranda’;

Bounceverb

(with reference to an object, especially a ball) move quickly up, back, or away from a surface after hitting it

‘he was bouncing the ball against the wall’; ‘the ball bounced away and he chased it’;

Boundverb

form the boundary of; enclose

‘the ground was bounded by a main road on one side and a meadow on the other’;

Bounceverb

(of light, sound, or an electronic signal) come into contact with an object or surface and be reflected back

‘short sound waves bounce off even small objects’;

Boundverb

place within certain limits; restrict

‘freedom of action is bounded by law’;

Bounceverb

(of an email) be returned to its sender after failing to reach its destination

‘I tried to email him, but the message bounced’;

Boundverb

past and past participle of bind

Bounceverb

recover well after a setback or problem

‘the savings rate has already started to bounce back and is sure to rise further’;

Boundnoun

a leaping movement towards or over something

‘I went up the steps in two effortless bounds’;

Bounceverb

come into sudden forceful contact with; collide with

‘people cross the road as slowly as possible, as if daring the cars to bounce them’;

Boundnoun

a territorial limit; a boundary

‘the ancient bounds of the forest’;

Bounceverb

jump repeatedly up and down, typically on something springy

‘Emma was happily bouncing up and down on the mattress’;

Boundnoun

a limitation or restriction on feeling or action

‘enthusiasm to join the union knew no bounds’; ‘it is not beyond the bounds of possibility that the issue could arise again’;

Bounceverb

move up and down repeatedly

‘the gangplank bounced under his confident step’;

Boundnoun

a limiting value

‘an upper bound on each modulus’;

Bounceverb

cause (a child) to move lightly up and down on one's knee as a game

‘I remember how you used to bounce me on your knee’;

Boundadjective

certain to be or to do or have something

‘there is bound to be a change of plan’;

Bounceverb

(of a vehicle) move jerkily along a bumpy surface

‘the car bounced down the narrow track’;

Boundadjective

obliged by law, circumstances, or duty to do something

‘I'm bound to do what I can to help Sam’; ‘I'm bound to say that I have some doubts’;

Bounceverb

move in a particular direction in an energetic, happy, or enthusiastic manner

‘Linda bounced in through the open front door’;

Boundadjective

restricted or confined to a specified place

‘his job kept him city-bound’;

Bounceverb

(of a cheque) be returned by a bank to the payee when there are not enough funds in the drawer's account to meet it

‘a further two cheques of £160 also bounced’;

Boundadjective

prevented from operating normally by the specified conditions

‘blizzard-bound Boston’;

Bounceverb

(of a bank) return a cheque to the payee when there are not enough funds in the drawer's account to meet it

‘the bank bounced the cheque’;

Boundadjective

(of a book) having a specified binding

‘fine leather-bound books’;

Bounceverb

eject (a troublemaker) forcibly from a nightclub or similar establishment.

Boundadjective

(of a grammatical element) occurring only in combination with another form.

Bounceverb

dismiss (someone) from a job

‘those who put in a dismal performance will be bounced from the tour’;

Boundadjective

in Chomskyan linguistics, (of a reflexive, reciprocal, or other linguistic unit) dependent for its reference on another noun phrase in the same sentence.

Bounceverb

pressurize (someone) into doing something, typically by presenting them with a fait accompli

‘the government should beware being bounced into any ill-considered foreign gamble’;

Boundadjective

going or ready to go towards a specified place

‘an express train bound for Edinburgh’; ‘the three moon-bound astronauts’;

Bouncenoun

a rebound of a ball or other object

‘the wicket was causing the occasional erratic bounce’;

Boundadjective

destined or very likely to have a specified experience

‘they were bound for disaster’;

Bouncenoun

the ability of a surface to make a ball rebound in a specified way

‘a pitch of low bounce’;

Bouncenoun

a collision.

Bouncenoun

an act of jumping or of moving up and down jerkily

‘every bounce of the truck brought them into fresh contact’;

Bouncenoun

a sudden rise in the level of something

‘economists agree that there could be a bounce in prices next year’;

Bouncenoun

exuberant self-confidence

‘the bounce was now back in Jenny's step’;

Bouncenoun

health and body in a person's hair

‘use conditioner to help hair regain its bounce’;

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