VS.

Bottom vs. Depth

Published:

Bottomnoun

The lowest part of anything.

‘Footers appear at the bottoms of pages.’;

Depthnoun

the vertical distance below a surface; the degree to which something is deep

‘Measure the depth of the water in this part of the bay.’;

Bottomnoun

Character, reliability, staying power, dignity, integrity or sound judgment.

‘lack bottom’;

Depthnoun

the distance between the front and the back, as the depth of a drawer or closet

Bottomnoun

A valley, often used in place names.

‘Where shall we go for a walk? How about Ashcombe Bottom?’;

Depthnoun

(figuratively) the intensity, complexity, strength, seriousness or importance of an emotion, situation, etc.

‘The depth of her misery was apparent to everyone.’; ‘The depth of the crisis had been exaggerated.’; ‘We were impressed by the depth of her knowledge.’;

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Bottomnoun

The buttocks or anus.

Depthnoun

lowness

‘the depth of a sound’;

Bottomnoun

(nautical) A cargo vessel, a ship.

Depthnoun

the total palette of available colors

Bottomnoun

(nautical) Certain parts of a vessel, particularly the cargo hold or the portion of the ship that is always underwater.

Depthnoun

the property of appearing three-dimensional

‘The depth of field in this picture is amazing.’;

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Bottomnoun

(baseball) The second half of an inning, the home team's turn at bat.

Depthnoun

the deepest part usually of a body of water

‘The burning ship finally sunk into the depths.’;

Bottomnoun

(BDSM) A submissive in sadomasochistic sexual activity.

Depthnoun

a very remote part.

‘Into the depths of the jungle...’; ‘In the depths of the night,’;

Bottomnoun

A man penetrated or with a preference for being penetrated during homosexual intercourse.

Depthnoun

the most severe part

‘in the depth of the crisis’; ‘in the depths of winter’;

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Bottomnoun

(physics) A bottom quark.

Depthnoun

(logic) the number of simple elements which an abstract conception or notion includes; the comprehension or content

Bottomnoun

The lowest part of a container.

Depthnoun

(horology) a pair of toothed wheels which work together

Bottomnoun

A ball or skein of thread; a cocoon.

Depthnoun

(aeronautics) the perpendicular distance from the chord to the farthest point of an arched surface

Bottomnoun

The bed of a body of water, as of a river, lake, or sea.

Depthnoun

(statistics) the lower of the two ranks of a value in an ordered set of values

Bottomnoun

An abyss.

Depthnoun

The quality of being deep; deepness; perpendicular measurement downward from the surface, or horizontal measurement backward from the front; as, the depth of a river; the depth of a body of troops.

Bottomnoun

(obsolete) Power of endurance.

‘a horse of a good bottom’;

Depthnoun

Profoundness; extent or degree of intensity; abundance; completeness; as, depth of knowledge, or color.

‘Mindful of that heavenly loveWhich knows no end in depth or height.’;

Bottomnoun

(obsolete) Dregs or grounds; lees; sediment.

Depthnoun

Lowness; as, depth of sound.

Bottomnoun

(usually: bottoms or bottomland) Low-lying land near a river with alluvial soil.

Depthnoun

That which is deep; a deep, or the deepest, part or place; the deep; the middle part; as, the depth of night, or of winter.

‘From you unclouded depth above.’; ‘The depth closed me round about.’;

Bottomverb

To fall to the lowest point.

Depthnoun

The number of simple elements which an abstract conception or notion includes; the comprehension or content.

Bottomverb

To establish firmly; to found or justify on or upon something; to set on a firm footing; to set or rest on or upon something which provides support or authority.

Depthnoun

A pair of toothed wheels which work together.

Bottomverb

(intransitive) To rest, as upon an ultimate support; to be based or grounded.

Depthnoun

The perpendicular distance from the chord to the farthest point of an arched surface.

Bottomverb

(intransitive) To reach or impinge against the bottom, so as to impede free action, as when the point of a cog strikes the bottom of a space between two other cogs, or a piston the end of a cylinder.

Depthnoun

the maximum number of times a type of procedure is reiteratively called before the last call is exited; - of subroutines or procedures which are reentrant; - used of call stacks.

Bottomverb

To wind round something, as in making a ball of thread.

Depthnoun

extent downward or backward or inward;

‘the depth of the water’; ‘depth of a shelf’; ‘depth of a closet’;

Bottomverb

(transitive) To furnish with a bottom.

‘to bottom a chair’;

Depthnoun

degree of psychological or intellectual depth

Bottomverb

(intransitive) To be the submissive in a BDSM relationship or roleplay.

Depthnoun

(usually plural) the deepest and most remote part;

‘from the depths of darkest Africa’; ‘signals received from the depths of space’;

Bottomverb

(intransitive) To be anally penetrated in gay sex.

‘I've never bottomed in my life.’;

Depthnoun

(usually plural) a low moral state;

‘he had sunk to the depths of addiction’;

Bottomadjective

The lowest or last place or position.

‘Those files should go on the bottom shelf.’;

Depthnoun

the intellectual ability to penetrate deeply into ideas

Bottomnoun

The lowest part of anything; the foot; as, the bottom of a tree or well; the bottom of a hill, a lane, or a page.

‘Or dive into the bottom of the deep.’;

Bottomnoun

The part of anything which is beneath the contents and supports them, as the part of a chair on which a person sits, the circular base or lower head of a cask or tub, or the plank floor of a ship's hold; the under surface.

‘Barrels with the bottom knocked out.’; ‘No two chairs were alike; such high backs and low backs and leather bottoms and worsted bottoms.’;

Bottomnoun

That upon which anything rests or is founded, in a literal or a figurative sense; foundation; groundwork.

Bottomnoun

The bed of a body of water, as of a river, lake, sea.

Bottomnoun

The fundament; the buttocks.

Bottomnoun

An abyss.

Bottomnoun

Low land formed by alluvial deposits along a river; low-lying ground; a dale; a valley.

Bottomnoun

The part of a ship which is ordinarily under water; hence, the vessel itself; a ship.

‘My ventures are not in one bottom trusted.’; ‘Not to sell the teas, but to return them to London in thesame bottoms in which they were shipped.’;

Bottomnoun

Power of endurance; as, a horse of a good bottom.

Bottomnoun

Dregs or grounds; lees; sediment.

‘He was at the bottom of many excellent counsels.’;

Bottomnoun

A ball or skein of thread; a cocoon.

‘Silkworms finish their bottoms in . . . fifteen days.’;

Bottomadjective

Of or pertaining to the bottom; fundamental; lowest; under; as, bottom rock; the bottom board of a wagon box; bottom prices.

Bottomverb

To found or build upon; to fix upon as a support; - followed by on or upon.

‘Action is supposed to be bottomed upon principle.’; ‘Those false and deceiving grounds upon which many bottom their eternal state].’;

Bottomverb

To furnish with a bottom; as, to bottom a chair.

Bottomverb

To reach or get to the bottom of.

Bottomverb

To rest, as upon an ultimate support; to be based or grounded; - usually with on or upon.

‘Find on what foundation any proposition bottoms.’;

Bottomverb

To reach or impinge against the bottom, so as to impede free action, as when the point of a cog strikes the bottom of a space between two other cogs, or a piston the end of a cylinder.

Bottomverb

To wind round something, as in making a ball of thread.

‘As you unwind her love from him,Lest it should ravel and be good to none,You must provide to bottom it on me.’;

Bottomnoun

the lower side of anything

Bottomnoun

the lowest part of anything;

‘they started at the bottom of the hill’;

Bottomnoun

the fleshy part of the human body that you sit on;

‘he deserves a good kick in the butt’; ‘are you going to sit on your fanny and do nothing?’;

Bottomnoun

the second half of an inning; while the home team is at bat

Bottomnoun

a depression forming the ground under a body of water;

‘he searched for treasure on the ocean bed’;

Bottomnoun

low-lying alluvial land near a river

Bottomnoun

a cargo ship;

‘they did much of their overseas trade in foreign bottoms’;

Bottomverb

provide with a bottom or a seat;

‘bottom the chairs’;

Bottomverb

strike the ground, as with a ship's bottom

Bottomverb

come to understand

Bottomadjective

situated at the bottom or lowest position;

‘the bottom drawer’; ‘the top shelf’;

Bottomadjective

at the bottom; lowest or last;

‘the bottom price’;

Bottomadjective

the lowest rank;

‘bottom member of the class’;

Bottomnoun

the lowest point or part of something

‘the bottom of the page’; ‘she paused at the bottom of the stairs’;

Bottomnoun

the ground under a sea, river, or lake

‘the liner plunged to the bottom of the sea’;

Bottomnoun

the lowest surface on the inside of a container

‘place the fruit on the bottom of the dish’;

Bottomnoun

the seat of a chair.

Bottomnoun

the furthest part or point of something

‘the shed at the bottom of the garden’;

Bottomnoun

the lowest position in a competition or ranking

‘he started at the bottom and now has his own business’;

Bottomnoun

the lower half of a specified two-piece garment

‘a pair of pyjama bottoms’;

Bottomnoun

another term for bottomland

‘river bottoms’;

Bottomnoun

the keel or hull of a ship

‘the double bottoms of the ship’;

Bottomnoun

a ship, especially a cargo carrier.

Bottomnoun

a person's buttocks

‘he climbs the side of the gorge, scratching his bottom unselfconsciously’;

Bottomnoun

one of six flavours of quark.

Bottomnoun

stamina or strength of character

‘whatever his faults, he possesses that old-fashioned quality—bottom’;

Bottomnoun

a man who takes the passive role in anal intercourse with another man.

Bottomadjective

in the lowest position

‘the books on the bottom shelf’;

Bottomadjective

(of a place) in the furthest position away in a downhill direction

‘the bottom field’;

Bottomadjective

in the lowest or last position in a competition or ranking

‘they came bottom with 17 points’; ‘I was put in the bottom class’;

Bottomverb

(of a ship) reach or touch the ground under the sea

‘nuclear submarines cannot bottom’;

Bottomverb

excavate (a hole or mine) to the level of a mineral-bearing stratum

‘scores of abandoned claims have never been properly bottomed, according to the old prospectors’;

Bottomverb

find gold or other minerals while mining

‘he's bottomed on opal there’;

Bottomverb

find the extent or real nature of

‘he had bottomed the whole inquiry’;

Bottomverb

(of a situation) reach the lowest point before stabilizing or improving

‘encouraging signs suggested the recession was bottoming out’;

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