VS.

Bottle vs. Carton

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Bottlenoun

A container, typically made of glass or plastic and having a tapered neck, used primarily for holding liquids.

‘Beer is often sold in bottles.’;

Cartonnoun

An inexpensive, disposable box-like container fashioned from either paper, paper with wax-covering (wax paper), or other lightweight material.

‘a carton of milk’;

Bottlenoun

The contents of such a container.

‘I only drank a bottle of beer.’;

Cartonnoun

A pack of cigarettes, usually ten, wrapped in cellophane or packed in a light cardboard box.

Bottlenoun

A container with a rubber nipple used for giving liquids to infants, a baby bottle.

‘The baby wants a bottle.’;

Cartonnoun

(archaic) A kind of thin pasteboard.

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Bottlenoun

Nerve, courage.

‘You don’t have the bottle to do that!’; ‘He was going to ask her out, but he lost his bottle when he saw her.’;

Cartonnoun

(archaic) A small disc within the bullseye of a target.

Bottlenoun

A container of hair dye, hence with one’s hair color produced by dyeing.

‘Did you know he’s a bottle brunette? His natural hair color is strawberry blonde.’;

Cartonnoun

(archaic) A shot that strikes this disc.

Bottlenoun

(obsolete) A bundle, especially of hay; something tied in a bundle.

Cartonverb

To put in a carton.

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Bottlenoun

(figurative) Intoxicating liquor; alcohol.

‘to drown one’s troubles in the bottle’; ‘to hit the bottle’; ‘Tracy Chapman, “Fast Car” (song): See, my old man’s got a problem. He liveSIC with the bottle; that’s the way it is.’;

Cartonnoun

Pasteboard for paper boxes; also, a pasteboard box.

Bottlenoun

(printing) the tendency of pages printed several on a sheet to rotate slightly when the sheet is folded two or more times.

Cartonnoun

the quantity contained in a carton

Bottlenoun

A dwelling; habitation.

Cartonnoun

a box made of cardboard; opens by flaps on top

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Bottlenoun

A building; house.

Cartonnoun

a small, light box or container in which drinks or foodstuffs are packaged

‘a carton of milk’;

Bottleverb

(transitive) To seal (a liquid) into a bottle for later consumption. Also fig.

‘This plant bottles vast quantities of spring water every day.’;

Cartonnoun

a large container of goods.

Bottleverb

To feed (an infant) baby formula.

‘Because of complications she can't breast feed her baby and so she bottles him.’;

Carton

A carton is a box or container usually made of liquid packaging board, paperboard and sometimes of corrugated fiberboard. Many types of cartons are used in packaging.

Bottleverb

To refrain from doing (something) at the last moment because of a sudden loss of courage.

‘The rider bottled the big jump.’;

Bottleverb

To strike (someone) with a bottle.

‘He was bottled at a nightclub and had to have facial surgery.’;

Bottleverb

To pelt (a musical act on stage, etc.) with bottles as a sign of disapproval.

‘Meat Loaf was once bottled at Reading Festival.’;

Bottlenoun

A hollow vessel, usually of glass or earthenware (but formerly of leather), with a narrow neck or mouth, for holding liquids.

Bottlenoun

The contents of a bottle; as much as a bottle contains; as, to drink a bottle of wine.

Bottlenoun

Fig.: Intoxicating liquor; as, to drown one's reason in the bottle.

Bottlenoun

A bundle, esp. of hay.

Bottleverb

To put into bottles; to inclose in, or as in, a bottle or bottles; to keep or restrain as in a bottle; as, to bottle wine or porter; to bottle up one's wrath.

Bottlenoun

glass or plastic vessel; cylindrical with a narrow neck; no handle

Bottlenoun

the quantity contained in a bottle

Bottleverb

store (liquids or gases) in bottles

Bottleverb

put into bottles;

‘bottle the mineral water’;

Bottle

A bottle is a narrow-necked container made of an impermeable material (clay, glass, plastic, aluminium etc.) in various shapes and sizes to store and transport liquids (water, milk, beer, wine, ink, cooking oil, medicine, soft drinks, shampoo, and chemicals, etc.) and whose mouth at the bottling line can be sealed with an internal stopper, an external bottle cap, a closure, or a conductive using induction sealing. Some of the earliest bottles appeared in China, Phoenicia, Crete, and Rome.

‘inner seal’;

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