VS.

Born vs. Express

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Bornverb

inflection of bear||past|part; given birth to, birthed.

Expressadjective

(not comparable) Moving or operating quickly, as a train not making local stops.

Bornverb

(obsolete) lang=en in other senses.

Expressadjective

(comparable) Specific or precise; directly and distinctly stated; not merely implied.

‘I gave him express instructions not to begin until I arrived, but he ignored me.’; ‘This book cannot be copied without the express permission of the publisher.’;

Bornverb

(Geordie) lang=en with fire etc.

Expressadjective

Truly depicted; exactly resembling.

‘In my eyes it bore a livelier image of the spirit, it seemed more express and single, than the imperfect and divided countenance.’;

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Bornadjective

Having from birth (or as if from birth) a certain quality or character; innate; inherited.

Expressadjective

(retail) Providing a more limited but presumably faster service than a full or complete dealer of the same kind or type.

‘The Pizza Hut inside Target isn't a full one: it's a Pizza Hut Express.’; ‘Some Wal-Mart stores will include a McDonald's Express.’; ‘The mall's selection of cell phone carriers includes a full AT&T store and a T-Mobile express.’;

Bornnoun

(Geordie) lang=en a stream

Expressnoun

A mode of transportation, often a train, that travels quickly or directly.

‘I took the express into town.’;

Bornadjective

Brought forth, as an animal; brought into life; introduced by birth.

‘No one could be born into slavery in Mexico.’;

Expressnoun

A service that allows mail or money to be sent rapidly from one destination to another.

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Bornadjective

Having from birth a certain character; by or from birth; by nature; innate; as, a born liar.

Expressnoun

An express rifle.

Bornnoun

British nuclear physicist (born in Germany) honored for his contributions to quantum mechanics (1882-1970)

Expressnoun

(obsolete) A clear image or representation; an expression; a plain declaration.

Bornadjective

brought into existence;

‘he was a child born of adultery’;

Expressnoun

A messenger sent on a special errand; a courier.

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Bornadjective

being talented through inherited qualities;

‘a natural leader’; ‘a born musician’; ‘an innate talent’;

Expressnoun

An express office.

Bornadjective

existing as a result of birth

‘she was born in Aberdeen’; ‘a newly born baby’; ‘I was born with a sense of curiosity’;

Expressnoun

That which is sent by an express messenger or message.

Bornadjective

having a specific nationality

‘a German-born philosopher’;

Expressnoun

(obsolete) The action of conveying some idea using words or actions; communication, expression.

Bornadjective

having a natural ability to do a particular job

‘he's a born engineer’;

Expressnoun

(obsolete) A specific statement or instruction.

Bornadjective

perfectly suited or trained to do a particular job

‘men born to rule’;

Expressverb

(transitive) To convey or communicate; to make known or explicit.

‘Words cannot express the love I feel for him.’;

Bornadjective

(of an organization, movement, or idea) brought into existence

‘on 1 January 1992, the new company was born’;

Expressverb

(transitive) To press, squeeze out (especially said of milk).

Bornadjective

existing as a result of (a particular situation or feeling)

‘his work is born of despair’;

Expressverb

(biochemistry) To translate messenger RNA into protein.

Expressverb

(biochemistry) To transcribe deoxyribonucleic acid into messenger RNA.

Expressadjective

Exactly representing; exact.

‘Their human countenanceThe express resemblance of the gods.’;

Expressadjective

Directly and distinctly stated; declared in terms; not implied or left to inference; made unambiguous by intention and care; clear; not dubious; as, express consent; an express statement.

‘I have express commandment.’;

Expressadjective

of or pertaining to an express train or other conveyance designated an express{5}; makiung few or no intermediate stops; as, an express stop; an express fare; an express elevator.

Expressadjective

Intended for a particular purpose; relating to an express; sent on a particular errand; dispatched with special speed; as, an express messenger or train. Also used adverbially.

‘A messenger sent express from the other world.’;

Expressnoun

A clear image or representation; an expression; a plain declaration.

‘The only remanent express of Christ's sacrifice on earth.’;

Expressnoun

A messenger sent on a special errand; a courier; hence, a regular and fast conveyance; commonly, a company or system for the prompt and safe transportation of merchandise or parcels.

Expressnoun

An express office.

‘She charged him . . . to ask at the express if anything came up from town.’;

Expressnoun

That which is sent by an express messenger or message.

Expressnoun

a railway train or bus for transporting passengers or goods with speed and punctuality; a train or bus that does not stop at certain stations. Contrasted to local; as, take the express to get there faster.

Expressverb

To press or squeeze out; as, to express the juice of grapes, or of apples; hence, to extort; to elicit.

‘All the fruits out of which drink is expressed.’; ‘And th'idle breath all utterly expressed.’; ‘Halters and racks can not express from theeMore than by deeds.’;

Expressverb

To make or offer a representation of; to show by a copy or likeness; to represent; to resemble.

‘Each skillful artist shall express thy form.’; ‘So kids and whelps their sires and dams express.’;

Expressverb

To give a true impression of; to represent and make known; to manifest plainly; to show in general; to exhibit, as an opinion or feeling, by a look, gesture, and esp. by language; to declare; to utter; to tell.

‘My words express my purpose.’; ‘They expressed in their lives those excellent doctrines of morality.’;

Expressverb

To make known the opinions or feelings of; to declare what is in the mind of; to show (one's self); to cause to appear; - used reflexively.

‘Mr. Phillips did express with much indignation against me, one evening.’;

Expressverb

To denote; to designate.

‘Moses and Aaron took these men, which are expressed by their names.’;

Expressverb

To send by express messenger; to forward by special opportunity, or through the medium of an express; as, to express a package.

Expressverb

to produce products that cause the appearance of the corresponding phenotype; - of a gene or of an organism with a specific gene; as, to express the beta-galactosidase gene,

Expressnoun

rapid transport of goods

Expressnoun

mail that is distributed by a rapid and efficient system

Expressnoun

public transport consisting of a fast train or bus that makes a limited number of scheduled stops;

‘he caught the express to New York’;

Expressverb

give expression to;

‘She showed her disappointment’;

Expressverb

articulate; either verbally or with a cry, shout, or noise;

‘She expressed her anger’; ‘He uttered a curse’;

Expressverb

indicate through a symbol, formula, etc.;

‘Can you express this distance in kilometers?’;

Expressverb

serve as a means for expressing something;

‘The painting of Mary carries motherly love’; ‘His voice carried a lot af anger’;

Expressverb

manifest the effects of (a gene or genetic trait);

‘Many of the laboratory animals express the trait’;

Expressverb

obtain from a substance, as by mechanical action;

‘Italians express coffee rather than filter it’;

Expressverb

send my rapid transport or special messenger service;

‘She expressed the letter to Florida’;

Expressadjective

not tacit or implied;

‘her express wish’;

Expressadjective

without unnecessary stops;

‘an express train’; ‘an express shipment’;

Expressadverb

by express;

‘please send the letter express’;

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