VS.

Bolt vs. Bout

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Boltnoun

A (usually) metal fastener consisting of a cylindrical body that is threaded, with a larger head on one end. It can be inserted into an unthreaded hole up to the head, with a nut then threaded on the other end; a heavy machine screw.

Boutnoun

A period of something, usually painful or unpleasant

‘a bout of drought.’;

Boltnoun

A sliding pin or bar in a lock or latch mechanism.

Boutnoun

(boxing) A boxing match.

Boltnoun

A bar of wood or metal dropped in horizontal hooks on a door and adjoining wall or between the two sides of a double door, to prevent the door(s) from being forced open.

Boutnoun

(fencing) An assault (a fencing encounter) at which the score is kept.

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Boltnoun

A sliding mechanism to chamber and unchamber a cartridge in a firearm.

Boutnoun

(roller derby) A roller derby match.

Boltnoun

A small personal-armour-piercing missile for short-range use, or (in common usage though deprecated by experts) a short arrow, intended to be shot from a crossbow or a catapult.

Boutnoun

A fighting competition.

Boltnoun

A lightning spark, i.e., a lightning bolt.

Boutnoun

(music) A bulge or widening in a musical instrument, such as either of the two characteristic bulges of a guitar.

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Boltnoun

A sudden event, action or emotion.

‘The problem's solution struck him like a bolt from the blue.’;

Boutnoun

(dated) The going and returning of a plough, or other implement used to mark the ground and create a headland, across a field.

Boltnoun

A large roll of fabric or similar material, as a bolt of cloth.

Boutverb

To contest a bout.

Boltnoun

(nautical) The standard linear measurement of canvas for use at sea: 39 yards.

Boutpreposition

(colloquial) lang=en

‘They're talking bout you!’; ‘Maddy is bout to get beat up!’;

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Boltnoun

A sudden spring or start; a sudden leap aside.

‘The horse made a bolt.’;

Boutnoun

As much of an action as is performed at one time; a going and returning, as of workmen in reaping, mowing, etc.; a turn; a round.

‘In notes with many a winding boutOf linked sweetness long drawn out.’; ‘The prince . . . has taken me in his train, so that I am in no danger of starving for this bout.’;

Boltnoun

A sudden flight, as to escape creditors.

Boutnoun

A conflict; contest; attempt; trial; a set-to at anything; as, a fencing bout; a drinking bout.

‘The gentleman will, for his honor's sake, have one bout with you; he can not by the duello avoid it.’;

Boltnoun

A refusal to support a nomination made by the party with which one has been connected; a breaking away from one's party.

Boutnoun

(sports) a period of play during which one team is on the offensive

Boltnoun

An iron to fasten the legs of a prisoner; a shackle; a fetter.

Boutnoun

a boxing match;

‘the fight was on television last night’;

Boltnoun

A burst of speed or efficiency.

Boutnoun

an occasion for excessive eating or drinking;

‘they went on a bust that lasted three days’;

Boltnoun

A sieve, especially a long fine sieve used in milling for bolting flour and meal; a bolter.

Boltverb

To connect or assemble pieces using a bolt.

‘Bolt the vice to the bench.’;

Boltverb

To secure a door by locking or barring it.

‘Bolt the door.’;

Boltverb

(intransitive) To flee, to depart, to accelerate suddenly.

‘Seeing the snake, the horse bolted.’; ‘The actor forgot his line and bolted from the stage.’;

Boltverb

(transitive) To cause to start or spring forth; to dislodge (an animal being hunted).

‘to bolt a rabbit’;

Boltverb

To strike or fall suddenly like a bolt.

Boltverb

(intransitive) To escape.

Boltverb

Of a plant, to grow quickly; to go to seed.

‘Lettuce and spinach will bolt as the weather warms up.’;

Boltverb

To swallow food without chewing it.

Boltverb

To drink one's drink very quickly; to down a drink.

‘Come on, everyone, bolt your drinks; I want to go to the next pub!’;

Boltverb

To refuse to support a nomination made by a party or caucus with which one has been connected; to break away from a party.

Boltverb

To utter precipitately; to blurt or throw out.

Boltverb

To sift, especially through a cloth.

Boltverb

To sift the bran and germ from wheat flour.

‘Graham flour is unbolted flour.’;

Boltverb

To separate, assort, refine, or purify by other means.

Boltverb

(legal) To discuss or argue privately, and for practice, as cases at law.

Boltadverb

Suddenly; straight; unbendingly.

‘The soldiers stood bolt upright for inspection.’;

Boltnoun

A shaft or missile intended to be shot from a crossbow or catapult, esp. a short, stout, blunt-headed arrow; a quarrel; an arrow, or that which resembles an arrow; a dart.

‘Look that the crossbowmen lack not bolts.’; ‘A fool's bolt is soon shot.’;

Boltnoun

Lightning; a thunderbolt.

Boltnoun

A strong pin, of iron or other material, used to fasten or hold something in place, often having a head at one end and screw thread cut upon the other end.

Boltnoun

A sliding catch, or fastening, as for a door or gate; the portion of a lock which is shot or withdrawn by the action of the key.

Boltnoun

An iron to fasten the legs of a prisoner; a shackle; a fetter.

‘Away with him to prison!lay bolts enough upon him.’;

Boltnoun

A compact package or roll of cloth, as of canvas or silk, often containing about forty yards.

Boltnoun

A bundle, as of oziers.

Boltnoun

A sudden spring or start; a sudden spring aside; as, the horse made a bolt.

Boltnoun

A sudden flight, as to escape creditors.

‘This gentleman was so hopelessly involved that he contemplated a bolt to America - or anywhere.’;

Boltnoun

A refusal to support a nomination made by the party with which one has been connected; a breaking away from one's party.

Boltnoun

A sieve, esp. a long fine sieve used in milling for bolting flour and meal; a bolter.

Boltverb

To shoot; to discharge or drive forth.

Boltverb

To utter precipitately; to blurt or throw out.

‘I hate when Vice can bolt her arguments.’;

Boltverb

To swallow without chewing; as, to bolt food; often used with down.

Boltverb

To refuse to support, as a nomination made by a party to which one has belonged or by a caucus in which one has taken part.

Boltverb

To cause to start or spring forth; to dislodge, as conies, rabbits, etc.

Boltverb

To fasten or secure with, or as with, a bolt or bolts, as a door, a timber, fetters; to shackle; to restrain.

‘Let tenfold iron bolt my door.’; ‘Which shackles accidents and bolts up change.’;

Boltverb

To start forth like a bolt or arrow; to spring abruptly; to come or go suddenly; to dart; as, to bolt out of the room.

‘This Puck seems but a dreaming dolt, . . . And oft out of a bush doth bolt.’;

Boltverb

To strike or fall suddenly like a bolt.

‘His cloudless thunder bolted on their heads.’;

Boltverb

To spring suddenly aside, or out of the regular path; as, the horse bolted.

Boltverb

To refuse to support a nomination made by a party or a caucus with which one has been connected; to break away from a party.

Boltverb

To sift or separate the coarser from the finer particles of, as bran from flour, by means of a bolter; to separate, assort, refine, or purify by other means.

‘He now had bolted all the flour.’; ‘Ill schooled in bolted language.’;

Boltverb

To separate, as if by sifting or bolting; - with out.

‘Time and nature will bolt out the truth of things.’;

Boltverb

To discuss or argue privately, and for practice, as cases at law.

‘This bolts the matter fairly to the bran.’; ‘The report of the committee was examined and sifted and bolted to the bran.’;

Boltadverb

In the manner of a bolt; suddenly; straight; unbendingly.

‘[He] came bolt up against the heavy dragoon.’;

Boltnoun

a discharge of lightning accompanied by thunder

Boltnoun

a sliding bar in a breech-loading firearm that ejects an empty cartridge and replaces it and closes the breech

Boltnoun

the part of a lock that is engaged or withdrawn with a key

Boltnoun

the act of moving with great haste;

‘he made a dash for the door’;

Boltnoun

a roll of cloth or wallpaper of a definite length

Boltnoun

a screw that screws into a nut to form a fastener

Boltnoun

a sudden abandonment (as from a political party)

Boltverb

move or jump suddenly;

‘She bolted from her seat’;

Boltverb

secure or lock with a bolt;

‘bolt the door’;

Boltverb

swallow hastily

Boltverb

run away; usually includes taking something or somebody along

Boltverb

leave suddenly and as if in a hurry;

‘The listeners bolted when he discussed his strange ideas’; ‘When she started to tell silly stories, I ran out’;

Boltverb

eat hastily without proper chewing;

‘Don't bolt your food!’;

Boltverb

make or roll into bolts;

‘bolt fabric’;

Boltadverb

in a rigid manner;

‘the body was rigidly erect’; ‘ge sat bolt upright’;

Boltadverb

directly;

‘he ran bang into the pole’; ‘ran slap into her’;

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