VS.

Bold vs. Stroke

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Boldnoun

(obsolete) A dwelling; habitation; building.

Strokenoun

An act of stroking moving one's hand over a surface.

‘She gave the cat a stroke.’;

Boldadjective

Courageous, daring.

‘Bold deeds win admiration and, sometimes, medals.’;

Strokenoun

A blow or hit.

‘a stroke on the chin’;

Boldadjective

Visually striking; conspicuous.

‘the painter's bold use of colour and outline’;

Strokenoun

A single movement with a tool.

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Boldadjective

Having thicker strokes than the ordinary form of the typeface.

‘The last word of this sentence is bold.’;

Strokenoun

(golf) A single act of striking at the ball with a club.

Boldadjective

Presumptuous, forward or impudent.

Strokenoun

(tennis) The hitting of a ball with a racket, or the movement of the racket and arm that produces that impact.

Boldadjective

(Ireland) Naughty; insolent; badly-behaved.

‘All of her children are terribly bold and never do as they are told.’;

Strokenoun

(rowing) The movement of an oar or paddle through water, either the pull which actually propels the vessel or a single entire cycle of movement including the pull.

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Boldadjective

Full-bodied.

Strokenoun

(cricket) The action of hitting the ball with the bat; a shot.

Boldadjective

(Philippines) Pornographic; depicting nudity.

Strokenoun

A thrust of a piston.

Boldadjective

Steep or abrupt.

Strokenoun

An act of striking with a weapon

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Boldverb

(transitive) To make (a font or some text) bold.

Strokenoun

One of a series of beats or movements against a resisting medium, by means of which movement through or upon it is accomplished.

‘the stroke of a bird's wing in flying, or of an oar in rowing’; ‘the stroke of a skater, swimmer, etc.’;

Boldverb

To make bold or daring.

Strokenoun

A powerful or sudden effort by which something is done, produced, or accomplished; also, something done or accomplished by such an effort.

‘a stroke of genius; a stroke of business; a master stroke of policy’;

Boldverb

To become bold.

Strokenoun

A line drawn with a pen or other writing implement, particularly:

Boldadjective

Forward to meet danger; venturesome; daring; not timorous or shrinking from risk; brave; courageous.

‘Throngs of knights and barons bold.’;

Strokenoun

The slash, /.

Boldadjective

Exhibiting or requiring spirit and contempt of danger; planned with courage; daring; vigorous.

Strokenoun

The formal name of the individual horizontal strikethroughs (as in A̶ and A̵).

Boldadjective

In a bad sense, too forward; taking undue liberties; over assuming or confident; lacking proper modesty or restraint; rude; impudent.

‘Thou art too wild, too rude and bold of voice.’;

Strokenoun

(linguistics) A line of a Chinese, Japanese or Korean character.

Boldadjective

Somewhat overstepping usual bounds, or conventional rules, as in art, literature, etc.; taking liberties in composition or expression; as, the figures of an author are bold.

‘The cathedral church is a very bold work.’;

Strokenoun

A streak made with a brush.

Boldadjective

Standing prominently out to view; markedly conspicuous; striking the eye; in high relief.

‘Shadows in painting . . . make the figure bolder.’;

Strokenoun

The time when a clock strikes.

‘on the stroke of midnight’;

Boldadjective

Steep; abrupt; prominent.

‘Where the bold cape its warning forehead rears.’;

Strokenoun

(swimming) A style, a single movement within a style.

‘butterfly stroke’;

Boldverb

To make bold or daring.

Strokenoun

(medicine) The loss of brain function arising when the blood supply to the brain is suddenly interrupted.

Boldverb

To be or become bold.

Strokenoun

(obsolete) A sudden attack of any disease, especially when fatal; any sudden, severe affliction or calamity.

‘a stroke of apoplexy; the stroke of death’;

Boldnoun

a typeface with thick heavy lines

Strokenoun

(rowing) The oar nearest the stern of a boat, by which the other oars are guided.

Boldadjective

fearless and daring;

‘bold settlers on some foreign shore’; ‘a bold speech’; ‘a bold adventure’;

Strokenoun

(rowing) The rower who is nearest the stern of the boat.

Boldadjective

clear and distinct;

‘bold handwriting’; ‘a figure carved in bold relief’; ‘a bold design’;

Strokenoun

(professional wrestling) Backstage influence.

Boldadjective

very steep; having a prominent and almost vertical front;

‘a bluff headland’; ‘where the bold chalk cliffs of England rise’; ‘a sheer descent of rock’;

Strokenoun

(squash) A point awarded to a player in case of interference or obstruction by the opponent.

Strokenoun

(sciences) An individual discharge of lightning.

‘A flash of lightning may be made up of several strokes. If they are separated by enough time for the eye to distinguish them, the lightning will appear to flicker.’;

Strokenoun

(obsolete) The result or effect of a striking; injury or affliction; soreness.

Strokenoun

An addition or amendment to a written composition; a touch.

‘to give some finishing strokes to an essay’;

Strokenoun

A throb or beat, as of the heart.

Strokenoun

Power; influence.

Strokenoun

(obsolete) appetite

Strokeverb

(transitive) To move one's hand or an object (such as a broom) along (a surface) in one direction.

Strokeverb

To hit the ball with the bat in a flowing motion.

Strokeverb

(masonry) To give a finely fluted surface to.

Strokeverb

To row the stroke oar of.

‘to stroke a boat’;

Stroke

Struck.

Strokenoun

The act of striking; a blow; a hit; a knock; esp., a violent or hostile attack made with the arm or hand, or with an instrument or weapon.

‘His hand fetcheth a stroke with the ax to cut down the tree.’; ‘A fool's lips enter into contention and his mouth calleth for strokes.’; ‘He entered and won the whole kingdom of Naples without striking a stroke.’;

Strokenoun

The result of effect of a striking; injury or affliction; soreness.

‘In the day that Lord bindeth up the breach of his people, and healeth the stroke of their wound.’;

Strokenoun

The striking of the clock to tell the hour.

‘Well, but what's o'clock?- Upon the stroke of ten. - Well, let is strike.’;

Strokenoun

A gentle, caressing touch or movement upon something; a stroking.

Strokenoun

A mark or dash in writing or printing; a line; the touch of a pen or pencil; as, an up stroke; a firm stroke.

‘O, lasting as those colors may they shine,Free as thy stroke, yet faultless as thy line.’;

Strokenoun

Hence, by extension, an addition or amandment to a written composition; a touch; as, to give some finishing strokes to an essay.

Strokenoun

A sudden attack of disease; especially, a fatal attack; a severe disaster; any affliction or calamity, especially a sudden one; as, a stroke of apoplexy; the stroke of death.

‘At this one stroke the man looked dead in law.’;

Strokenoun

A throb or beat, as of the heart.

Strokenoun

One of a series of beats or movements against a resisting medium, by means of which movement through or upon it is accomplished; as, the stroke of a bird's wing in flying, or an oar in rowing, of a skater, swimmer, etc.

Strokenoun

A powerful or sudden effort by which something is done, produced, or accomplished; also, something done or accomplished by such an effort; as, a stroke of genius; a stroke of business; a master stroke of policy.

Strokenoun

The movement, in either direction, of the piston plunger, piston rod, crosshead, etc., as of a steam engine or a pump, in which these parts have a reciprocating motion; as, the forward stroke of a piston; also, the entire distance passed through, as by a piston, in such a movement; as, the piston is at half stroke.

Strokenoun

Power; influence.

‘He has a great stroke with the reader.’;

Strokenoun

Appetite.

‘The oars where silver,Which to the tune of flutes kept stroke.’;

Strokeverb

To strike.

‘Ye mote with the plat sword againStroken him in the wound, and it will close.’;

Strokeverb

To rib gently in one direction; especially, to pass the hand gently over by way of expressing kindness or tenderness; to caress; to soothe.

‘He dried the falling drops, and, yet more kind,He stroked her cheeks.’;

Strokeverb

To make smooth by rubbing.

Strokeverb

To give a finely fluted surface to.

Strokeverb

To row the stroke oar of; as, to stroke a boat.

Strokenoun

(sports) the act of swinging or striking at a ball with a club or racket or bat or cue or hand;

‘it took two strokes to get out of the bunker’; ‘a good shot require good balance and tempo’; ‘he left me an almost impossible shot’;

Strokenoun

the maximum movement available to a pivoted or reciprocating piece by a cam

Strokenoun

a sudden loss of consciousness resulting when the rupture or occlusion of a blood vessel leads to oxygen lack in the brain

Strokenoun

a light touch

Strokenoun

a light touch with the hands

Strokenoun

the oarsman nearest the stern of the shell who sets the pace for the rest of the crew

Strokenoun

a punctuation mark (/) used to separate related items of information

Strokenoun

a mark made by a writing implement (as in cursive writing)

Strokenoun

any one of the repeated movements of the limbs and body used for locomotion in swimming or rowing

Strokenoun

a single complete movement

Strokeverb

touch lightly and with affection, with brushing motions;

‘He stroked his long beard’;

Strokeverb

strike a ball with a smooth blow

Strokeverb

row at a particular rate

Strokeverb

treat gingerly or carefully;

‘You have to stroke the boss’;

Strokenoun

an act of hitting or striking someone or something; a blow

‘he received three strokes of the cane’;

Strokenoun

a method of striking the ball in sports or games.

Strokenoun

an act of hitting the ball with a club, as a unit of scoring

‘he won by two strokes’;

Strokenoun

the sound made by a striking clock

‘the first stroke would belt out from the clock’;

Strokenoun

a mark made by drawing a pen, pencil, or paintbrush in one direction across paper or canvas

‘the paint had been applied in careful, regular strokes’;

Strokenoun

a line forming part of a written or printed character.

Strokenoun

a short printed or written diagonal line typically separating characters or figures.

Strokenoun

an act of moving one's hand across a surface with gentle pressure

‘massage the cream into your skin using light upward strokes’;

Strokenoun

each of a series of movements in which something moves out of its position and back into it

‘the ray swam with effortless strokes of its huge wings’;

Strokenoun

the whole motion of a piston in either direction.

Strokenoun

the rhythm to which a series of repeated movements is performed

‘the rowers sing to keep their stroke’;

Strokenoun

a movement of the arms and legs forming one of a series in swimming

‘I slipped into the water and swam a few strokes’;

Strokenoun

a particular style of moving the arms and legs in swimming

‘front crawl is a popular stroke’;

Strokenoun

(in rowing) the mode or action of moving the oar.

Strokenoun

the oar or oarsman nearest the stern of a boat, setting the timing for the other rowers.

Strokenoun

a sudden disabling attack or loss of consciousness caused by an interruption in the flow of blood to the brain, especially through thrombosis

‘smoking increases the risk of stroke’; ‘he was left disabled by a stroke’;

Strokeverb

move one's hand with gentle pressure over (a surface), typically repeatedly; caress

‘he put his hand on her hair and stroked it’;

Strokeverb

apply (something) to a surface using a gentle movement

‘she strokes blue eyeshadow on her eyelids’;

Strokeverb

reassure or flatter (someone), especially in order to gain their cooperation

‘production executives were expert at stroking stars and brokering talent’;

Strokeverb

act as the stroke of (a boat or crew)

‘he stroked the coxed four to victory’;

Strokeverb

hit or kick (a ball) smoothly and deliberately

‘Markwick stroked the ball home’;

Stroke

A stroke is a medical condition in which poor blood flow to the brain causes cell death. There are two main types of stroke: ischemic, due to lack of blood flow, and hemorrhagic, due to bleeding.

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