VS.

Belt vs. Strip

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Beltnoun

A band worn around the waist to hold clothing to one's body (usually pants), hold weapons (such as a gun or sword), or serve as a decorative piece of clothing.

‘As part of the act, the fat clown's belt broke, causing his pants to fall down.’;

Stripnoun

Long, thin piece of land, or of any material.

‘You use strips of paper in papier mache.’; ‘He welded together some pieces of strip.’;

Beltnoun

A band used as a restraint for safety purposes, such as a seat belt.

‘Keep your belt fastened; this is going to be quite a bumpy ride.’;

Stripnoun

A comic strip.

Beltnoun

A band that is used in a machine to help transfer motion or power.

‘The motor had a single belt that snaked its way back and forth around a variety of wheels.’;

Stripnoun

A landing strip.

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Beltnoun

Anything that resembles a belt, or that encircles or crosses like a belt; a strip or stripe.

‘a belt of trees; a belt of sand’;

Stripnoun

A strip steak.

Beltnoun

A trophy in the shape of a belt, generally awarded for martial arts.

‘the heavyweight belt’;

Stripnoun

A street with multiple shopping or entertainment possibilities.

Beltnoun

(astronomy) A collection of rocky-constituted bodies (such as asteroids) which orbit a star.

Stripnoun

(fencing) The fencing area, roughly 14 meters by 2 meters.

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Beltnoun

(astronomy) One of certain girdles or zones on the surface of the planets Jupiter and Saturn, supposed to be of the nature of clouds.

Stripnoun

(UK football) the uniform of a football team, or the same worn by supporters.

Beltnoun

A powerful blow, often made with a fist or heavy object.

‘After the bouncer gave him a solid belt to the gut, Simon had suddenly had enough of barfighting.’;

Stripnoun

Striptease.

Beltnoun

A quick drink of liquor.

‘Care to join me in a belt of scotch?’;

Stripnoun

(mining) A trough for washing ore.

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Beltnoun

A geographical region known for a particular product, feature or demographic (Corn Belt, Bible Belt, Black Belt, Green Belt).

Stripnoun

The issuing of a projectile from a rifled gun without acquiring the spiral motion.

Beltnoun

(baseball) The part of the strike zone at the height of the batter's waist.

‘That umpire called that pitch a strike at the belt.’;

Stripverb

(transitive) To remove or take away, often in strips or stripes.

‘Norm will strip the old varnish before painting the chair.’;

Beltnoun

(weapons) device that holds and feeds cartridges into a belt-fed weapon

Stripverb

To take off clothing.

Beltverb

(transitive) To encircle.

‘The small town was belted by cornfields in all directions.’;

Stripverb

(intransitive) To perform a striptease.

Beltverb

(transitive) To fasten a belt on.

‘Edgar belted himself in and turned the car's ignition.’; ‘The rotund man had difficulty belting his pants, and generally wore suspenders to avoid the issue.’;

Stripverb

(transitive) To take away something from (someone or something); to plunder; to divest.

Beltverb

(transitive) To invest (a person) with a belt as part of a formal ceremony such as knighthood.

Stripverb

(transitive) To remove cargo from (a container).

Beltverb

(transitive) To hit with a belt.

‘The child was misbehaving so he was belted as punishment.’;

Stripverb

(transitive) To remove (the thread or teeth) from a screw, nut, or gear.

‘The thread is stripped.’; ‘The screw is stripped.’;

Beltverb

(transitive) To scream or sing in a loud manner.

‘He belted out the national anthem.’;

Stripverb

(intransitive) To fail in the thread; to lose the thread, as a bolt, screw, or nut.

Beltverb

(transitive) To drink quickly, often in gulps.

‘He belted down a shot of whisky.’;

Stripverb

(transitive) To remove color from hair, cloth, etc. to prepare it to receive new color.

Beltverb

To hit someone or something.

‘The angry player belted the official across the face, and as a result was ejected from the game.’;

Stripverb

To remove all cards of a particular suit from another player. (See also, strip-squeeze.)

Beltverb

To hit a pitched ball a long distance, usually for a home run.

‘He belted that pitch over the grandstand.’;

Stripverb

(transitive) To empty (tubing) by applying pressure to the outside of (the tubing) and moving that pressure along (the tubing).

Beltverb

(intransitive) To move very fast

‘He was really belting along.’;

Stripverb

(transitive) To milk a cow, especially by stroking and compressing the teats to draw out the last of the milk.

Beltnoun

That which engirdles a person or thing; a band or girdle; as, a lady's belt; a sword belt.

‘The shining belt with gold inlaid.’;

Stripverb

To run a television series at the same time daily (or at least on Mondays to Fridays), so that it appears as a strip straight across the weekly schedule.

Beltnoun

That which restrains or confines as a girdle.

‘He cannot buckle his distempered causeWithin the belt of rule.’;

Stripverb

To pare off the surface of (land) in strips.

Beltnoun

Anything that resembles a belt, or that encircles or crosses like a belt; a strip or stripe; as, a belt of trees; a belt of sand.

Stripverb

To pass; to get clear of; to outstrip.

Beltnoun

Same as Band, n., 2. A very broad band is more properly termed a belt.

Stripverb

To remove the metal coating from (a plated article), as by acids or electrolytic action.

Beltnoun

One of certain girdles or zones on the surface of the planets Jupiter and Saturn, supposed to be of the nature of clouds.

Stripverb

To remove fibre, flock, or lint from; said of the teeth of a card when it becomes partly clogged.

Beltnoun

A narrow passage or strait; as, the Great Belt and the Lesser Belt, leading to the Baltic Sea.

Stripverb

To pick the cured leaves from the stalks of (tobacco) and tie them into "hands".

Beltnoun

A token or badge of knightly rank.

Stripverb

To remove the midrib from (tobacco leaves).

Beltnoun

A band of leather, or other flexible substance, passing around two wheels, and communicating motion from one to the other.

Stripadjective

Involving the removal of clothes.

Beltnoun

A band or stripe, as of color, round any organ; or any circular ridge or series of ridges.

Stripverb

To deprive; to bereave; to make destitute; to plunder; especially, to deprive of a covering; to skin; to peel; as, to strip a man of his possession, his rights, his privileges, his reputation; to strip one of his clothes; to strip a beast of his skin; to strip a tree of its bark.

‘And strippen her out of her rude array.’; ‘They stripped Joseph out of his coat.’; ‘Opinions which . . . no clergyman could have avowed without imminent risk of being stripped of his gown.’;

Beltverb

To encircle with, or as with, a belt; to encompass; to surround.

‘A coarse black robe belted round the waist.’; ‘They belt him round with hearts undaunted.’;

Stripverb

To divest of clothing; to uncover.

‘Before the folk herself strippeth she.’; ‘Strip your sword stark naked.’;

Beltverb

To shear, as the buttocks and tails of sheep.

Stripverb

To dismantle; as, to strip a ship of rigging, spars, etc.

Beltnoun

endless loop of flexible material between two rotating shafts or pulleys

Stripverb

To pare off the surface of, as land, in strips.

Beltnoun

a band to tie or buckle around the body (usually at the waist)

Stripverb

To deprive of all milk; to milk dry; to draw the last milk from; hence, to milk with a peculiar movement of the hand on the teats at the last of a milking; as, to strip a cow.

Beltnoun

an elongated region where a specific condition is found;

‘a belt of high pressure’;

Stripverb

To pass; to get clear of; to outstrip.

‘When first they stripped the Malean promontory.’; ‘Before he reached it he was out of breath,And then the other stripped him.’;

Beltnoun

a vigorous blow;

‘the sudden knock floored him’; ‘he took a bash right in his face’; ‘he got a bang on the head’;

Stripverb

To pull or tear off, as a covering; to remove; to wrest away; as, to strip the skin from a beast; to strip the bark from a tree; to strip the clothes from a man's back; to strip away all disguisses.

‘To strip bad habits from a corrupted heart, is stripping off the skin.’;

Beltnoun

a path or strip (as cut by one course of mowing)

Stripverb

To tear off (the thread) from a bolt or nut; as, the thread is stripped.

Beltnoun

the act of hitting vigorously;

‘he gave the table a whack’;

Stripverb

To remove the metal coating from (a plated article), as by acids or electrolytic action.

Beltverb

sing loudly and forcefully

Stripverb

To remove fiber, flock, or lint from; - said of the teeth of a card when it becomes partly clogged.

Beltverb

deliver a blow to;

‘He belted his opponent’;

Stripverb

To pick the cured leaves from the stalks of (tobacco) and tie them into "hands"; to remove the midrib from (tobacco leaves).

Beltverb

fasten with a belt;

‘belt your trousers’;

Stripverb

To take off, or become divested of, clothes or covering; to undress.

Stripverb

To fail in the thread; to lose the thread, as a bolt, screw, or nut. See Strip, v. t., 8.

Stripnoun

A narrow piece, or one comparatively long; as, a strip of cloth; a strip of land.

Stripnoun

A trough for washing ore.

Stripnoun

The issuing of a projectile from a rifled gun without acquiring the spiral motion.

Stripnoun

a relatively long narrow piece of something;

‘he felt a flat strip of muscle’;

Stripnoun

artifact consisting of a narrow flat piece of material

Stripnoun

an airfield without normal airport facilities

Stripnoun

a sequence of drawings telling a story in a newspaper or comic book

Stripnoun

thin piece of wood or metal

Stripnoun

a form of erotic entertainment in which a dancer gradually undresses to music;

‘she did a strip right in front of everyone’;

Stripverb

take away possessions from someone;

‘The Nazis stripped the Jews of all their assets’;

Stripverb

get undressed;

‘please don't undress in front of everybody!’; ‘She strips in front of strangers every night for a living’;

Stripverb

remove the surface from;

‘strip wood’;

Stripverb

remove substances from by a percolating liquid;

‘leach the soil’;

Stripverb

lay bare;

‘denude a forest’;

Stripverb

steal goods; take as spoils;

‘During the earthquake people looted the stores that were deserted by their owners’;

Stripverb

remove all contents or possession from, or empty completely;

‘The boys cleaned the sandwich platters’; ‘The trees were cleaned of apples by the storm’;

Stripverb

strip the cured leaves from;

‘strip tobacco’;

Stripverb

remove the thread (of screws)

Stripverb

remove a constituent from a liquid

Stripverb

take off or remove;

‘strip a wall of its wallpaper’;

Stripverb

draw the last milk (of cows)

Stripverb

remove (someone's or one's own) clothes;

‘The nurse quickly undressed the accident victim’; ‘She divested herself of her outdoor clothes’; ‘He disinvested himself of his garments’;

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