VS.

Beat vs. Track

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  • Beat (noun)

    A stroke; a blow.

  • Beat (noun)

    A pulsation or throb.

    "a beat of the heart; the beat of the pulse"

  • Beat (noun)

    A pulse on the beat level, the metric level at which pulses are heard as the basic unit. Thus a beat is the basic time unit of a piece.

  • Beat (noun)

    A rhythm.

  • Beat (noun)

    [specifically] The rhythm signalled by a conductor or other musician to the members of a group of musicians.

  • Beat (noun)

    The interference between two tones of almost equal frequency

  • Beat (noun)

    A short pause in a play, screenplay, or teleplay, for dramatic or comedic effect; a plot point or story development.

  • Beat (noun)

    The route patrolled by a police officer or a guard.

    "to walk the beat"

  • Beat (noun)

    An area of a person's responsibility, especially

  • Beat (noun)

    An act of reporting news or scientific results before a rival; a scoop.

  • Beat (noun)

    That which beats, or surpasses, another or others.

    "the beat of him"

  • Beat (noun)

    A place of habitual or frequent resort.

  • Beat (noun)

    A low cheat or swindler.

    "a dead beat"

  • Beat (noun)

    The instrumental portion of a piece of hip-hop music.

  • Beat (noun)

    The act of scouring, or ranging over, a tract of land to rouse or drive out game; also, those so engaged, collectively.

  • Beat (noun)

    A smart tap on the adversary's blade.

  • Beat (noun)

    A beatnik.

  • Beat (verb)

    To hit; strike

    "As soon as she heard that her father had died, she went into a rage and beat the wall with her fists until her knuckles bled."

    "knock|pound|strike|hammer|whack"

  • Beat (verb)

    To strike or pound repeatedly, usually in some sort of rhythm.

    "He danced hypnotically while she beat the atabaque."

  • Beat (verb)

    To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly.

  • Beat (verb)

    To move with pulsation or throbbing.

  • Beat (verb)

    To win against; to defeat or overcome; to do better than, outdo, or excel (someone) in a particular, competitive event.

    "Jan had little trouble beating John in tennis. He lost five games in a row."

    "No matter how quickly Joe finished his test, Roger always beat him."

    "I just can't seem to beat the last level of this video game."

  • Beat (verb)

    To sail to windward using a series of alternate tacks across the wind.

  • Beat (verb)

    To strike (water, foliage etc.) in order to drive out game; to travel through (a forest etc.) for hunting.

  • Beat (verb)

    To mix food in a rapid fashion. Compare whip.

    "Beat the eggs and whip the cream."

  • Beat (verb)

    of a buyer, to persuade the seller to reduce a price

    "He wanted $50 for it, but I managed to beat him down to $35."

  • Beat (verb)

    To indicate by beating or drumming.

    "to beat a retreat; to beat to quarters"

  • Beat (verb)

    To tread, as a path.

  • Beat (verb)

    To exercise severely; to perplex; to trouble.

  • Beat (verb)

    To be in agitation or doubt.

  • Beat (verb)

    To make a sound when struck.

    "The drums beat."

  • Beat (verb)

    To make a succession of strokes on a drum.

    "The drummers beat to call soldiers to their quarters."

  • Beat (verb)

    To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison.

  • Beat (verb)

    To arrive at a place before someone.

    "He beat me there."

    "The place is empty, we beat the crowd of people who come at lunch."

  • Beat (verb)

    to masturbate.

    "This was the second time he beat off today."

  • Beat (adjective)

    exhausted

    "After the long day, she was feeling completely beat."

  • Beat (adjective)

    dilapidated, beat up

    "Dude, you drive a beat car like that and you ain’t gonna get no honeys."

  • Beat (adjective)

    fabulous

    "Her makeup was beat!"

  • Beat (adjective)

    boring

  • Beat (adjective)

    ugly

  • Track (noun)

    A mark left by something that has passed along.

    "Follow the track of the ship."

    "Can you see any tracks in the snow?"

  • Track (noun)

    A mark or impression left by the foot, either of man or animal.

    "The fox tracks were still visible in the snow."

  • Track (noun)

    The entire lower surface of the foot; said of birds, etc.

  • Track (noun)

    A road or other similar beaten path.

    "Follow the track for a hundred metres."

  • Track (noun)

    Physical course; way.

    "Astronomers predicted the track of the comet."

  • Track (noun)

    A path or course laid out for a race, for exercise, etc.

    "The athletes ran round the track."

  • Track (noun)

    The direction and progress of someone or something; path.

  • Track (noun)

    The way or rails along which a train moves.

    "They briefly closed the railway to remove debris found on the track."

  • Track (noun)

    A tract or area, such as of land.

  • Track (noun)

    Awareness of something, especially when arising from close monitoring.

  • Track (noun)

    The distance between two opposite wheels on a same axletree (also track width)

  • Track (noun)

    Short for caterpillar track.

  • Track (noun)

    The pitch.

  • Track (noun)

    Sound stored on a record.

  • Track (noun)

    The physical track on a record.

  • Track (noun)

    A song or other relatively short piece of music, on a record, separated from others by a short silence

    "My favourite track on the album is "Sunshine"."

  • Track (noun)

    A circular (never-ending) data storage unit on a side of magnetic or optical disk, divided into sectors.

  • Track (noun)

    The racing events of track and field; track and field in general.

    "I'm going to try out for track next week."

  • Track (noun)

    A session talk on a conference.

  • Track (verb)

    To continue observing over time.

  • Track (verb)

    To observe the (measured) state of a person or object over time.

    "We will track the raven population over the next six months."

  • Track (verb)

    To monitor the movement of a person or object.

    "Agent Miles has been tracking the terrorist since Madrid."

  • Track (verb)

    To match the movement or change of a person or object.

    "My height tracks my father's at my age, so I might end up as tall as him."

  • Track (verb)

    To travel so that a moving object remains in shot.

    "The camera tracked the ball even as the field of play moved back and forth, keeping the action in shot the entire time."

  • Track (verb)

    To follow the tracks of.

    "My uncle spent all day tracking the deer, whose hoofprints were clear in the mud."

  • Track (verb)

    To move.

    "The hurricane tracked further west than expected."

  • Track (verb)

    To discover the location of a person or object.

    "I tracked Joe to his friend's bedroom, where he had spent the night."

  • Track (verb)

    To create a musical recording (a track).

    "Lil Kyle is gonna track with that DJ next week.''"

  • Track (verb)

    To leave in the form of tracks.

    "In winter, my cat tracks mud all over the house."

Wiktionary
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  • Beat

    To strike repeatedly; to lay repeated blows upon; as, to beat one's breast; to beat iron so as to shape it; to beat grain, in order to force out the seeds; to beat eggs and sugar; to beat a drum.

  • Beat

    To punish by blows; to thrash.

  • Beat

    To scour or range over in hunting, accompanied with the noise made by striking bushes, etc., for the purpose of rousing game.

  • Beat

    To dash against, or strike, as with water or wind.

  • Beat

    To tread, as a path.

  • Beat

    To overcome in a battle, contest, strife, race, game, etc.; to vanquish, defeat, or conquer; to surpass or be superior to.

  • Beat

    To cheat; to chouse; to swindle; to defraud; - often with out.

  • Beat

    To exercise severely; to perplex; to trouble.

  • Beat

    To give the signal for, by beat of drum; to sound by beat of drum; as, to beat an alarm, a charge, a parley, a retreat; to beat the general, the reveille, the tattoo. See Alarm, Charge, Parley, etc.

  • Beat

    to baffle or stump; to defy the comprehension of (a person); as, it beats me why he would do that.

  • Beat

    to evade, avoid, or escape (blame, taxes, punishment); as, to beat the rap (be acquitted); to beat the sales tax by buying out of state.

  • Beat (verb)

    To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly.

  • Beat (verb)

    To move with pulsation or throbbing.

  • Beat (verb)

    To come or act with violence; to dash or fall with force; to strike anything, as rain, wind, and waves do.

  • Beat (verb)

    To be in agitation or doubt.

  • Beat (verb)

    To make progress against the wind, by sailing in a zigzag line or traverse.

  • Beat (verb)

    To make a sound when struck; as, the drums beat.

  • Beat (verb)

    To make a succession of strokes on a drum; as, the drummers beat to call soldiers to their quarters.

  • Beat (verb)

    To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; - said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison.

  • Beat (noun)

    A stroke; a blow.

  • Beat (noun)

    A recurring stroke; a throb; a pulsation; as, a beat of the heart; the beat of the pulse.

  • Beat (noun)

    The rise or fall of the hand or foot, marking the divisions of time; a division of the measure so marked. In the rhythm of music the beat is the unit.

  • Beat (noun)

    A sudden swelling or reënforcement of a sound, recurring at regular intervals, and produced by the interference of sound waves of slightly different periods of vibrations; applied also, by analogy, to other kinds of wave motions; the pulsation or throbbing produced by the vibrating together of two tones not quite in unison. See Beat, v. i., 8.

  • Beat (noun)

    A round or course which is frequently gone over; as, a watchman's beat; analogously, for newspaper reporters, the subject or territory that they are assigned to cover; as, the Washington beat.

  • Beat (noun)

    A place of habitual or frequent resort.

  • Beat (noun)

    A cheat or swindler of the lowest grade; - often emphasized by dead; as, a dead beat; also, deadbeat.

  • Beat (noun)

    One that beats, or surpasses, another or others; as, the beat of him.

  • Beat (noun)

    The act of one that beats a person or thing

  • Beat (noun)

    The act of scouring, or ranging over, a tract of land to rouse or drive out game; also, those so engaged, collectively.

  • Beat (noun)

    A smart tap on the adversary's blade.

  • Beat (adjective)

    Weary; tired; fatigued; exhausted.

  • Track (noun)

    A mark left by something that has passed along; as, the track, or wake, of a ship; the track of a meteor; the track of a sled or a wheel.

  • Track (noun)

    A mark or impression left by the foot, either of man or beast; trace; vestige; footprint.

  • Track (noun)

    The entire lower surface of the foot; - said of birds, etc.

  • Track (noun)

    A road; a beaten path.

  • Track (noun)

    Course; way; as, the track of a comet.

  • Track (noun)

    A path or course laid out for a race, for exercise, etc.

  • Track (noun)

    The permanent way; the rails.

  • Track (noun)

    A tract or area, as of land.

  • Track

    To follow the tracks or traces of; to pursue by following the marks of the feet; to trace; to trail; as, to track a deer in the snow.

  • Track

    To draw along continuously, as a vessel, by a line, men or animals on shore being the motive power; to tow.

Webster Dictionary
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  • Beat (noun)

    a regular route for a sentry or policeman;

    "in the old days a policeman walked a beat and knew all his people by name"

  • Beat (noun)

    the rhythmic contraction and expansion of the arteries with each beat of the heart;

    "he could feel the beat of her heart"

  • Beat (noun)

    the basic rhythmic unit in a piece of music;

    "the piece has a fast rhythm"

    "the conductor set the beat"

  • Beat (noun)

    a single pulsation of an oscillation produced by adding two waves of different frequencies; has a frequency equal to the difference between the two oscillations

  • Beat (noun)

    a member of the beat generation; a nonconformist in dress and behavior

  • Beat (noun)

    the sound of stroke or blow;

    "he heard the beat of a drum"

  • Beat (noun)

    (prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of verse

  • Beat (noun)

    a regular rate of repetition;

    "the cox raised the beat"

  • Beat (noun)

    a stroke or blow;

    "the signal was two beats on the steam pipe"

  • Beat (noun)

    the act of beating to windward; sailing as close as possible to the direction from which the wind is blowing

  • Beat (verb)

    come out better in a competition, race, or conflict;

    "Agassi beat Becker in the tennis championship"

    "We beat the competition"

    "Harvard defeated Yale in the last football game"

  • Beat (verb)

    give a beating to; subject to a beating, either as a punishment or as an act of aggression;

    "Thugs beat him up when he walked down the street late at night"

    "The teacher used to beat the students"

  • Beat (verb)

    hit repeatedly;

    "beat on the door"

    "beat the table with his shoe"

  • Beat (verb)

    move rhythmically;

    "Her heart was beating fast"

  • Beat (verb)

    shape by beating;

    "beat swords into ploughshares"

  • Beat (verb)

    make a rhythmic sound;

    "Rain drummed against the windshield"

    "The drums beat all night"

  • Beat (verb)

    glare or strike with great intensity;

    "The sun was beating down on us"

  • Beat (verb)

    move with a thrashing motion;

    "The bird flapped its wings"

    "The eagle beat its wings and soared high into the sky"

  • Beat (verb)

    sail with much tacking or with difficulty;

    "The boat beat in the strong wind"

  • Beat (verb)

    stir vigorously;

    "beat the egg whites"

    "beat the cream"

  • Beat (verb)

    strike (a part of one's own body) repeatedly, as in great emotion or in accompaniment to music;

    "beat one's breast"

    "beat one's foot rhythmically"

  • Beat (verb)

    be superior;

    "Reading beats watching television"

    "This sure beats work!"

  • Beat (verb)

    avoid paying;

    "beat the subway fare"

  • Beat (verb)

    make a sound like a clock or a timer;

    "the clocks were ticking"

    "the grandfather clock beat midnight"

  • Beat (verb)

    move with a flapping motion;

    "The bird's wings were flapping"

  • Beat (verb)

    indicate by beating, as with the fingers or drumsticks;

    "Beat the rhythm"

  • Beat (verb)

    move with or as if with a regular alternating motion;

    "the city pulsated with music and excitement"

  • Beat (verb)

    make by pounding or trampling;

    "beat a path through the forest"

  • Beat (verb)

    produce a rhythm by striking repeatedly;

    "beat the drum"

  • Beat (verb)

    strike (water or bushes) repeatedly to rouse animals for hunting

  • Beat (verb)

    beat through cleverness and wit;

    "I beat the traffic"

    "She outfoxed her competitors"

  • Beat (verb)

    be a mystery or bewildering to;

    "This beats me!"

    "Got me--I don't know the answer!"

    "a vexing problem"

    "This question really stuck me"

  • Beat (verb)

    wear out completely;

    "This kind of work exhausts me"

    "I'm beat"

    "He was all washed up after the exam"

  • Beat (adjective)

    very tired;

    "was all in at the end of the day"

    "so beat I could flop down and go to sleep anywhere"

    "bushed after all that exercise"

    "I'm dead after that long trip"

  • Track (noun)

    a line or route along which something travels or moves;

    "the hurricane demolished houses in its path"

    "the track of an animal"

    "the course of the river"

  • Track (noun)

    evidence pointing to a possible solution;

    "the police are following a promising lead"

    "the trail led straight to the perpetrator"

  • Track (noun)

    a pair of parallel rails providing a runway for wheels

  • Track (noun)

    a course over which races are run

  • Track (noun)

    a distinct selection of music from a recording or a compact disc;

    "he played the first cut on the cd"

    "the title track of the album"

  • Track (noun)

    an endless metal belt on which tracked vehicles move over the ground

  • Track (noun)

    (computer science) one of the circular magnetic paths on a magnetic disk that serve as a guide for writing and reading data

  • Track (noun)

    a groove on a phonograph recording

  • Track (noun)

    a bar or bars of rolled steel making a track along which vehicles can roll

  • Track (noun)

    any road or path affording passage especially a rough one

  • Track (noun)

    the act of participating in an athletic competition involving running on a track

  • Track (verb)

    carry on the feet and deposit;

    "track mud into the house"

  • Track (verb)

    observe or plot the moving path of something;

    "track a missile"

  • Track (verb)

    go after with the intent to catch;

    "The policeman chased the mugger down the alley"

    "the dog chased the rabbit"

  • Track (verb)

    travel across or pass over;

    "The caravan covered almost 100 miles each day"

  • Track (verb)

    make tracks upon

Princeton's WordNet
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