VS.

Beat vs. Bite

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Beatnoun

A stroke; a blow.

Biteverb

(transitive) To cut off a piece by clamping the teeth.

‘As soon as you bite that sandwich, you'll know how good it is.’;

Beatnoun

A pulsation or throb.

‘a beat of the heart; the beat of the pulse’;

Biteverb

(transitive) To hold something by clamping one's teeth.

Beatnoun

A pulse on the beat level, the metric level at which pulses are heard as the basic unit. Thus a beat is the basic time unit of a piece.

Biteverb

(intransitive) To attack with the teeth.

‘That dog is about to bite!’;

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Beatnoun

A rhythm.

Biteverb

(intransitive) To behave aggressively; to reject advances.

‘If you see me, come and say hello. I don't bite.’;

Beatnoun

(music) [specifically] The rhythm signalled by a conductor or other musician to the members of a group of musicians.

Biteverb

(intransitive) To take hold; to establish firm contact with.

‘I needed snow chains to make the tires bite.’;

Beatnoun

The interference between two tones of almost equal frequency

Biteverb

(intransitive) To have significant effect, often negative.

‘For homeowners with adjustable rate mortgages, rising interest will really bite.’;

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Beatnoun

(authorship) A short pause in a play, screenplay, or teleplay, for dramatic or comedic effect; a plot point or story development.

Biteverb

To bite a baited hook or other lure and thus be caught.

‘Are the fish biting today?’;

Beatnoun

The route patrolled by a police officer or a guard.

‘to walk the beat’;

Biteverb

To accept something offered, often secretly or deceptively, to cause some action by the acceptor.

‘I've planted the story. Do you think they'll bite?’;

Beatnoun

(by extension) An area of a person's responsibility, especially

Biteverb

To sting.

‘These mosquitoes are really biting today!’;

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Beatnoun

In journalism, the primary focus of a reporter's stories (such as police/courts, education, city government, business etc.).

Biteverb

(intransitive) To cause a smarting sensation; to have a property which causes such a sensation; to be pungent.

‘It bites like pepper or mustard.’;

Beatnoun

(dated) An act of reporting news or scientific results before a rival; a scoop.

Biteverb

To cause sharp pain or damage to; to hurt or injure.

‘Pepper bites the mouth.’;

Beatnoun

That which beats, or surpasses, another or others.

‘the beat of him’;

Biteverb

(intransitive) To cause sharp pain; to produce anguish; to hurt or injure; to have the property of so doing.

Beatnoun

(dated) A place of habitual or frequent resort.

Biteverb

(intransitive) To take or keep a firm hold.

‘The anchor bites.’;

Beatnoun

(archaic) A low cheat or swindler.

‘a dead beat’;

Biteverb

(transitive) To take hold of; to hold fast; to adhere to.

‘The anchor bites the ground.’;

Beatnoun

The instrumental portion of a piece of hip-hop music.

Biteverb

To lack quality; to be worthy of derision; to suck.

‘This music really bites.’;

Beatnoun

(hunting) The act of scouring, or ranging over, a tract of land to rouse or drive out game; also, those so engaged, collectively.

Biteverb

To perform oral sex on. Used in invective.

‘You don't like that I sat on your car? Bite me.’;

Beatnoun

(fencing) A smart tap on the adversary's blade.

Biteverb

To plagiarize, to imitate.

‘He always be biting my moves.’;

Beatnoun

A beatnik.

Biteverb

(obsolete) To deceive or defraud; to take in.

Beatverb

(transitive) To hit; strike

‘As soon as she heard that her father had died, she went into a rage and beat the wall with her fists until her knuckles bled.’;

Bitenoun

The act of biting.

Beatverb

(transitive) To strike or pound repeatedly, usually in some sort of rhythm.

‘He danced hypnotically while she beat the atabaque.’;

Bitenoun

The wound left behind after having been bitten.

‘That snake bite really hurts!’;

Beatverb

(intransitive) To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly.

Bitenoun

The swelling of one's skin caused by an insect's mouthparts or sting.

‘After just one night in the jungle I was covered with mosquito bites.’;

Beatverb

(intransitive) To move with pulsation or throbbing.

Bitenoun

A piece of food of a size that would be produced by biting; a mouthful.

‘There were only a few bites left on the plate.’;

Beatverb

(transitive) To win against; to defeat or overcome; to do better than, outdo, or excel (someone) in a particular, competitive event.

‘Jan had little trouble beating John in tennis. He lost five games in a row.’; ‘No matter how quickly Joe finished his test, Roger always beat him.’; ‘I just can't seem to beat the last level of this video game.’;

Bitenoun

(slang) Something unpleasant.

‘That's really a bite!’;

Beatverb

To sail to windward using a series of alternate tacks across the wind.

Bitenoun

(slang) An act of plagiarism.

‘That song is a bite of my song!’;

Beatverb

(transitive) To strike (water, foliage etc.) in order to drive out game; to travel through (a forest etc.) for hunting.

Bitenoun

A small meal or snack.

‘I'll have a quick bite to quiet my stomach until dinner.’;

Beatverb

To mix food in a rapid fashion. Compare whip.

‘Beat the eggs and whip the cream.’;

Bitenoun

(figuratively) aggression

Beatverb

of a buyer, to persuade the seller to reduce a price

‘He wanted $50 for it, but I managed to beat him down to $35.’;

Bitenoun

The hold which the short end of a lever has upon the thing to be lifted, or the hold which one part of a machine has upon another.

Beatverb

(transitive) To indicate by beating or drumming.

‘to beat a retreat; to beat to quarters’;

Bitenoun

A cheat; a trick; a fraud.

Beatverb

To tread, as a path.

Bitenoun

A sharper; one who cheats.

Beatverb

To exercise severely; to perplex; to trouble.

Bitenoun

(printing) A blank on the edge or corner of a page, owing to a portion of the frisket, or something else, intervening between the type and paper.

Beatverb

To be in agitation or doubt.

Biteverb

To seize with the teeth, so that they enter or nip the thing seized; to lacerate, crush, or wound with the teeth; as, to bite an apple; to bite a crust; the dog bit a man.

‘Such smiling rogues as these,Like rats, oft bite the holy cords atwain.’;

Beatverb

To make a sound when struck.

‘The drums beat.’;

Biteverb

To puncture, abrade, or sting with an organ (of some insects) used in taking food.

Beatverb

To make a succession of strokes on a drum.

‘The drummers beat to call soldiers to their quarters.’;

Biteverb

To cause sharp pain, or smarting, to; to hurt or injure, in a literal or a figurative sense; as, pepper bites the mouth.

Beatverb

To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison.

Biteverb

To cheat; to trick; to take in.

Beatverb

(transitive) To arrive at a place before someone.

‘He beat me there.’; ‘The place is empty, we beat the crowd of people who come at lunch.’;

Biteverb

To take hold of; to hold fast; to adhere to; as, the anchor bites the ground.

‘The last screw of the rack having been turned so often that its purchase crumbled, . . . it turned and turned with nothing to bite.’;

Beatverb

to masturbate.

‘This was the second time he beat off today.’;

Biteverb

To seize something forcibly with the teeth; to wound with the teeth; to have the habit of so doing; as, does the dog bite?

Beatadjective

exhausted

‘After the long day, she was feeling completely beat.’;

Biteverb

To cause a smarting sensation; to have a property which causes such a sensation; to be pungent; as, it bites like pepper or mustard.

Beatadjective

dilapidated, beat up

‘Dude, you drive a beat car like that and you ain’t gonna get no honeys.’;

Biteverb

To cause sharp pain; to produce anguish; to hurt or injure; to have the property of so doing.

‘At the last it [wine] biteth like serpent, and stingeth like an adder.’;

Beatadjective

(gay slang) fabulous

‘Her makeup was beat!’;

Biteverb

To take a bait into the mouth, as a fish does; hence, to take a tempting offer.

Beatadjective

(slang) boring

Biteverb

To take or keep a firm hold; as, the anchor bites.

Beatadjective

ugly

Bitenoun

The act of seizing with the teeth or mouth; the act of wounding or separating with the teeth or mouth; a seizure with the teeth or mouth, as of a bait; as, to give anything a hard bite.

‘I have known a very good fisher angle diligently four or six hours for a river carp, and not have a bite.’;

Beatverb

To strike repeatedly; to lay repeated blows upon; as, to beat one's breast; to beat iron so as to shape it; to beat grain, in order to force out the seeds; to beat eggs and sugar; to beat a drum.

‘Thou shalt beat some of it [spices] very small.’; ‘They did beat the gold into thin plates.’;

Bitenoun

The act of puncturing or abrading with an organ for taking food, as is done by some insects.

Beatverb

To punish by blows; to thrash.

Bitenoun

The wound made by biting; as, the pain of a dog's or snake's bite; the bite of a mosquito.

Beatverb

To scour or range over in hunting, accompanied with the noise made by striking bushes, etc., for the purpose of rousing game.

‘To beat the woods, and rouse the bounding prey.’;

Bitenoun

A morsel; as much as is taken at once by biting.

Beatverb

To dash against, or strike, as with water or wind.

‘A frozen continent . . . beat with perpetual storms.’;

Bitenoun

The hold which the short end of a lever has upon the thing to be lifted, or the hold which one part of a machine has upon another.

Beatverb

To tread, as a path.

‘Pass awful gulfs, and beat my painful way.’;

Bitenoun

A cheat; a trick; a fraud.

‘The baser methods of getting money by fraud and bite, by deceiving and overreaching.’;

Beatverb

To overcome in a battle, contest, strife, race, game, etc.; to vanquish, defeat, or conquer; to surpass or be superior to.

‘He beat them in a bloody battle.’; ‘For loveliness, it would be hard to beat that.’;

Bitenoun

A sharper; one who cheats.

Beatverb

To cheat; to chouse; to swindle; to defraud; - often with out.

Bitenoun

A blank on the edge or corner of a page, owing to a portion of the frisket, or something else, intervening between the type and paper.

Beatverb

To exercise severely; to perplex; to trouble.

‘Why should any one . . . beat his head about the Latin grammar who does not intend to be a critic?’;

Bitenoun

a wound resulting from biting by an animal or a person

Beatverb

To give the signal for, by beat of drum; to sound by beat of drum; as, to beat an alarm, a charge, a parley, a retreat; to beat the general, the reveille, the tattoo. See Alarm, Charge, Parley, etc.

Bitenoun

a small amount of solid food; a mouthful;

‘all they had left was a bit of bread’;

Beatverb

to baffle or stump; to defy the comprehension of (a person); as, it beats me why he would do that.

Bitenoun

a painful wound caused by the thrust of an insect's stinger into skin

Beatverb

to evade, avoid, or escape (blame, taxes, punishment); as, to beat the rap (be acquitted); to beat the sales tax by buying out of state.

Bitenoun

a light informal meal

Beatverb

To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly.

‘The men of the city . . . beat at the door.’;

Bitenoun

(angling) an instance of a fish taking the bait;

‘after fishing for an hour he still had not had a bite’;

Beatverb

To move with pulsation or throbbing.

‘A thousand hearts beat happily.’;

Bitenoun

wit having a sharp and caustic quality;

‘he commented with typical pungency’; ‘the bite of satire’;

Beatverb

To come or act with violence; to dash or fall with force; to strike anything, as rain, wind, and waves do.

‘Sees rolling tempests vainly beat below.’; ‘They [winds] beat at the crazy casement.’; ‘The sun beat upon the head of Jonah, that he fainted, and wished in himself to die.’; ‘Public envy seemeth to beat chiefly upon ministers.’;

Bitenoun

a strong odor or taste property;

‘the pungency of mustard’; ‘the sulfurous bite of garlic’; ‘the sharpness of strange spices’;

Beatverb

To be in agitation or doubt.

‘To still my beating mind.’;

Bitenoun

the act of gripping or chewing off with the teeth and jaws

Beatverb

To make progress against the wind, by sailing in a zigzag line or traverse.

Bitenoun

a portion removed from the whole;

‘the government's weekly bite from my paycheck’;

Beatverb

To make a sound when struck; as, the drums beat.

Biteverb

to grip, cut off, or tear with or as if with the teeth or jaws;

‘Gunny invariably tried to bite her’;

Beatverb

To make a succession of strokes on a drum; as, the drummers beat to call soldiers to their quarters.

Biteverb

cause a sharp or stinging pain or discomfort;

‘The sun burned his face’;

Beatverb

To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; - said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison.

Biteverb

penetrate or cut, as with a knife;

‘The fork bit into the surface’;

Beatnoun

A stroke; a blow.

‘He, with a careless beat,Struck out the mute creation at a heat.’;

Biteverb

deliver a sting to;

‘A bee stung my arm yesterday’;

Beatnoun

A recurring stroke; a throb; a pulsation; as, a beat of the heart; the beat of the pulse.

Biteverb

(of a person or animal) use the teeth to cut into something

‘she was biting a slice of bread’; ‘Rosa bit into a cupcake’; ‘babies learn to bite and chew about halfway through their first year’; ‘the woman's arm was bitten off by an alligator’;

Beatnoun

The rise or fall of the hand or foot, marking the divisions of time; a division of the measure so marked. In the rhythm of music the beat is the unit.

Biteverb

use the teeth in order to inflict injury on

‘he was chased and bitten by a police dog’; ‘it is not unusual for a dog to bite at its owner's hand’; ‘she had bitten, scratched, and kicked her assailant’;

Beatnoun

A sudden swelling or reënforcement of a sound, recurring at regular intervals, and produced by the interference of sound waves of slightly different periods of vibrations; applied also, by analogy, to other kinds of wave motions; the pulsation or throbbing produced by the vibrating together of two tones not quite in unison. See Beat, v. i., 8.

Biteverb

(of a snake, insect, or spider) wound with fangs, pincers, or a sting

‘while on holiday she was bitten by an adder’;

Beatnoun

A round or course which is frequently gone over; as, a watchman's beat; analogously, for newspaper reporters, the subject or territory that they are assigned to cover; as, the Washington beat.

Biteverb

(of an acid) corrode a surface

‘chemicals have bitten deep into the stone’;

Beatnoun

A place of habitual or frequent resort.

Biteverb

(of a fish) take the bait or lure on the end of a fishing line into the mouth

‘I marvel at how easily and eagerly a chub will bite’;

Beatnoun

A cheat or swindler of the lowest grade; - often emphasized by dead; as, a dead beat; also, deadbeat.

Biteverb

be persuaded to accept a deal or offer

‘a hundred or so retailers should bite’;

Beatnoun

One that beats, or surpasses, another or others; as, the beat of him.

Biteverb

annoy or worry

‘what's biting you today?’;

Beatnoun

The act of one that beats a person or thing

‘It's a beat on the whole country.’;

Biteverb

(of a tool, tyre, boot, etc.) grip or take hold on a surface

‘once on the slab, my boots failed to bite’;

Beatnoun

The act of scouring, or ranging over, a tract of land to rouse or drive out game; also, those so engaged, collectively.

‘Bears coming out of holes in the rocks at the last moment, when the beat is close to them.’;

Biteverb

(of an object) press into a part of the body, causing pain

‘the handcuffs bit into his wrists’;

Beatnoun

A smart tap on the adversary's blade.

Biteverb

cause emotional pain

‘Cheryl's betrayal had bitten deep’;

Beatadjective

Weary; tired; fatigued; exhausted.

‘Quite beat, and very much vexed and disappointed.’;

Biteverb

(of a policy or situation) take effect, with unpleasant consequences

‘the cuts in art education were starting to bite’;

Beatnoun

a regular route for a sentry or policeman;

‘in the old days a policeman walked a beat and knew all his people by name’;

Biteverb

be very bad, unpleasant, or unfortunate

‘it bites that your mom won't let you go’;

Beatnoun

the rhythmic contraction and expansion of the arteries with each beat of the heart;

‘he could feel the beat of her heart’;

Bitenoun

an act of biting something in order to eat it

‘Stephen ate a hot dog in three big bites’;

Beatnoun

the basic rhythmic unit in a piece of music;

‘the piece has a fast rhythm’; ‘the conductor set the beat’;

Bitenoun

a wound inflicted by an animal's or a person's teeth

‘Percy's dog had given her a nasty bite’;

Beatnoun

a single pulsation of an oscillation produced by adding two waves of different frequencies; has a frequency equal to the difference between the two oscillations

Bitenoun

a wound inflicted by a snake, insect, or spider

‘my legs were covered in mosquito bites’;

Beatnoun

a member of the beat generation; a nonconformist in dress and behavior

Bitenoun

an instance of bait being taken by a fish

‘by four o'clock he still hadn't had a single bite’;

Beatnoun

the sound of stroke or blow;

‘he heard the beat of a drum’;

Bitenoun

the bringing together of the teeth so that the jaws are closed.

Beatnoun

(prosody) the accent in a metrical foot of verse

Bitenoun

an imprint of the position of the teeth when the jaws are closed, made in a plastic material.

Beatnoun

a regular rate of repetition;

‘the cox raised the beat’;

Bitenoun

a piece cut off by biting

‘Robyn took a large bite out of her sandwich’;

Beatnoun

a stroke or blow;

‘the signal was two beats on the steam pipe’;

Bitenoun

a quick snack

‘I plan to stop off in the village and have a bite to eat’;

Beatnoun

the act of beating to windward; sailing as close as possible to the direction from which the wind is blowing

Bitenoun

a small morsel of prepared food, intended to constitute one mouthful

‘bacon bites with cheese’;

Beatverb

come out better in a competition, race, or conflict;

‘Agassi beat Becker in the tennis championship’; ‘We beat the competition’; ‘Harvard defeated Yale in the last football game’;

Bitenoun

a short piece of information.

Beatverb

give a beating to; subject to a beating, either as a punishment or as an act of aggression;

‘Thugs beat him up when he walked down the street late at night’; ‘The teacher used to beat the students’;

Bitenoun

a sharp or pungent flavour

‘a fresh, lemony bite’;

Beatverb

hit repeatedly;

‘beat on the door’; ‘beat the table with his shoe’;

Bitenoun

incisiveness or cogency of style

‘the tale has added bite if its characters appear to be real’;

Beatverb

move rhythmically;

‘Her heart was beating fast’;

Bitenoun

a feeling of cold in the air or wind

‘by early October there's a bite in the air’;

Beatverb

shape by beating;

‘beat swords into ploughshares’;

Beatverb

make a rhythmic sound;

‘Rain drummed against the windshield’; ‘The drums beat all night’;

Beatverb

glare or strike with great intensity;

‘The sun was beating down on us’;

Beatverb

move with a thrashing motion;

‘The bird flapped its wings’; ‘The eagle beat its wings and soared high into the sky’;

Beatverb

sail with much tacking or with difficulty;

‘The boat beat in the strong wind’;

Beatverb

stir vigorously;

‘beat the egg whites’; ‘beat the cream’;

Beatverb

strike (a part of one's own body) repeatedly, as in great emotion or in accompaniment to music;

‘beat one's breast’; ‘beat one's foot rhythmically’;

Beatverb

be superior;

‘Reading beats watching television’; ‘This sure beats work!’;

Beatverb

avoid paying;

‘beat the subway fare’;

Beatverb

make a sound like a clock or a timer;

‘the clocks were ticking’; ‘the grandfather clock beat midnight’;

Beatverb

move with a flapping motion;

‘The bird's wings were flapping’;

Beatverb

indicate by beating, as with the fingers or drumsticks;

‘Beat the rhythm’;

Beatverb

move with or as if with a regular alternating motion;

‘the city pulsated with music and excitement’;

Beatverb

make by pounding or trampling;

‘beat a path through the forest’;

Beatverb

produce a rhythm by striking repeatedly;

‘beat the drum’;

Beatverb

strike (water or bushes) repeatedly to rouse animals for hunting

Beatverb

beat through cleverness and wit;

‘I beat the traffic’; ‘She outfoxed her competitors’;

Beatverb

be a mystery or bewildering to;

‘This beats me!’; ‘Got me--I don't know the answer!’; ‘a vexing problem’; ‘This question really stuck me’;

Beatverb

wear out completely;

‘This kind of work exhausts me’; ‘I'm beat’; ‘He was all washed up after the exam’;

Beatadjective

very tired;

‘was all in at the end of the day’; ‘so beat I could flop down and go to sleep anywhere’; ‘bushed after all that exercise’; ‘I'm dead after that long trip’;

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