VS.

Beacon vs. Deacon

Published:
Views: 59

Beaconnoun

A signal fire to notify of the approach of an enemy, or to give any notice, commonly of warning.

Deaconnoun

(Church history) A designated minister of charity in the early Church (see Acts 6:1-6).

Beaconnoun

(nautical) A signal or conspicuous mark erected on an eminence near the shore, or moored in shoal water, as a guide to mariners.

Deaconnoun

(Orthodoxy and Roman Catholicism) A clergyman ranked directly below a priest, with duties of helping the priests and carrying out parish work.

Beaconnoun

A post or buoy placed over a shoal or bank to warn vessels of danger; also a signal mark on land. (FM 55-501)

Deaconnoun

(Protestantism) Free Churches: A lay leader of a congregation who assists the pastor.

ADVERTISEMENT

Beaconnoun

A high hill or other easily distinguishable object near the shore which can serve as guidance for seafarers.

Deaconnoun

(Protestantism) Anglicanism: An ordained clergyman usually serving a year prior to being ordained presbyter, though in some cases they remain a permanent deacon.

Beaconnoun

(figurative) That which gives notice of danger.

Deaconnoun

(Protestantism) Methodism: A separate office from that of minister, neither leading to the other; instead there is a permanent deaconate.

Beaconnoun

An electronic device that broadcasts a signal to nearby portable devices, enabling smartphones etc. to perform actions when in physical proximity to the beacon.

Deaconnoun

(freemasonry) A junior lodge officer.

ADVERTISEMENT

Beaconverb

(intransitive) To act as a beacon.

Deaconnoun

(Mormonism) The lowest office in the Aaronic priesthood, generally held by 12 or 13 year old boys or recent converts.

Beaconverb

(transitive) To give light to, as a beacon; to light up; to illumine.

Deaconnoun

A male calf of a dairy breed, so called because they are usually deaconed (see below).

Beaconverb

(transitive) To furnish with a beacon or beacons.

Deaconnoun

(Scotland) The chairman of an incorporated company.

ADVERTISEMENT

Beaconnoun

A signal fire to notify of the approach of an enemy, or to give any notice, commonly of warning.

‘No flaming beacons cast their blaze afar.’;

Deaconverb

For a choir leader to lead a hymn by speaking one or two lines at a time, which are then sung by the choir.

Beaconnoun

A signal, such as that from a lighthouse, or a conspicuous mark erected on an eminence near the shore, or moored in shoal water, as a guide to mariners.

Deaconverb

To kill a calf shortly after birth.

Beaconnoun

A high hill near the shore.

Deaconverb

To place fresh fruit at the top of a barrel or other container, with spoiled or imperfect fruit hidden beneath.

Beaconnoun

That which gives notice of danger.

‘Modest doubt is calledThe beacon of the wise.’;

Deaconverb

To make sly alterations to the boundaries of (land); to adulterate or doctor (an article to be sold), etc.

Beaconnoun

a radio transmitter which emits a characteristic signal indication its location, so that vehicles may determine their exact location by locating the beacon with a radio compass; - also called radio beacon.

Deaconnoun

An officer in Christian churches appointed to perform certain subordinate duties varying in different communions. In the Roman Catholic and Episcopal churches, a person admitted to the lowest order in the ministry, subordinate to the bishops and priests. In Presbyterian churches, he is subordinate to the minister and elders, and has charge of certain duties connected with the communion service and the care of the poor. In Congregational churches, he is subordinate to the pastor, and has duties as in the Presbyterian church.

Beaconnoun

that which provides guidance or inspiration; the Constitution has been a beacon for civil rights activists.

Deaconnoun

The chairman of an incorporated company.

Beaconverb

To give light to, as a beacon; to light up; to illumine.

‘That beacons the darkness of heaven.’;

Deaconverb

To read aloud each line of (a psalm or hymn) before singing it, - usually with off.

Beaconverb

To furnish with a beacon or beacons.

Deaconverb

With humorous reference to hypocritical posing: To pack (fruit or vegetables) with the finest specimens on top; to alter slyly the boundaries of (land); to adulterate or doctor (an article to be sold), etc.

Beaconnoun

a fire (usually on a hill or tower) that can be seen from a distance

Deaconnoun

a Protestant layman who assists the minister

Beaconnoun

a radio station that broadcasts a directional signal for navigational purposes

Deaconnoun

a cleric ranking just below a priest in Christian churches; one of the Holy Orders

Beaconnoun

a tower with a light that gives warning of shoals to passing ships

Deacon

A deacon is a member of the diaconate, an office in Christian churches that is generally associated with service of some kind, but which varies among theological and denominational traditions. Major Christian churches, such as the Catholic Church, the Oriental Orthodox Churches, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Scandinavian Lutheran Churches and the Anglican Church, including the Free Church of England, view the diaconate as part of the clerical state.

Beaconverb

shine like a beacon

Beaconverb

guide with a beacon

Beacon

A beacon is an intentionally conspicuous device designed to attract attention to a specific location. A common example is the lighthouse, which draws attention to a fixed point that can be used to navigate around obstacles or into port.

Beacon Illustrations

Deacon Illustrations

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons