VS.

Batter vs. Bruise

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Batterverb

To hit or strike violently and repeatedly.

‘The firemen battered down the door.’;

Bruiseverb

(transitive) To strike (a person), originally with something flat or heavy, but now specifically in such a way as to discolour the skin without breaking it.

Batterverb

(cooking) To coat with batter (the food ingredient).

‘I prefer it when they batter the cod with breadcrumbs.’;

Bruiseverb

(transitive) To damage the skin of (fruit), in an analogous way.

Batterverb

(figurative) To defeat soundly; to thrash.

‘Leeds United battered Charlton 7-0.’;

Bruiseverb

(intransitive) Of fruit, to gain bruises through being handled roughly.

‘Bananas bruise easily.’;

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Batterverb

To intoxicate.

‘That cocktails will batter you!’; ‘I was battered last night on our pub crawl.’;

Bruiseverb

(intransitive) To become bruised.

‘I bruise easily.’;

Batterverb

(metalworking) To flatten (metal) by hammering, so as to compress it inwardly and spread it outwardly.

Bruiseverb

(intransitive) To fight with the fists; to box.

Batterverb

(architecture) To slope (of walls, buildings etc.).

Bruisenoun

(medicine) A purplish mark on the skin due to leakage of blood from capillaries under the surface that have been damaged by a blow.

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Batternoun

(cooking) A beaten mixture of flour and liquid (usually egg and milk), used for baking (e.g. pancakes, cake, or Yorkshire pudding) or to coat food (e.g. fish) prior to frying

‘pancake batter’; ‘To the dismay of his mother, the boy put his finger into the cake batter.’;

Bruisenoun

A dark mark on fruit caused by a blow to its surface.

Batternoun

A binge, a heavy drinking session.

‘When he went on a batter, he became very violent.’;

Bruiseverb

To injure, as by a blow or collision, without laceration; to contuse; as, to bruise one's finger with a hammer; to bruise the bark of a tree with a stone; to bruise an apple by letting it fall.

Batternoun

A paste of clay or loam.

Bruiseverb

To break; as in a mortar; to bray, as minerals, roots, etc.; to crush.

‘Nor bruise her flowerets with the armed hoofs.’;

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Batternoun

(printing) A bruise on the face of a plate or of type in the form.

Bruiseverb

To fight with the fists; to box.

‘Bruising was considered a fine, manly, old English custom.’;

Batternoun

An incline on the outer face of a built wall.

Bruisenoun

An injury to the flesh of animals, or to plants, fruit, etc., with a blunt or heavy instrument, or by collision with some other body; a contusion; as, a bruise on the head; bruises on fruit.

‘From the sole of the foot even unto the head there is no soundness in it; but wounds, and bruises.’;

Batternoun

(baseball) The player attempting to hit the ball with a bat.

‘The first batter hit the ball into the corner for a double.’;

Bruisenoun

an injury that doesn't break the skin but results in some discoloration

Batternoun

The player attempting to hit the ball with a bat; a batsman.

Bruiseverb

injure the underlying soft tissue of bone of;

‘I bruised my knee’;

Batterverb

To beat with successive blows; to beat repeatedly and with violence, so as to bruise, shatter, or demolish; as, to batter a wall or rampart.

Bruiseverb

hurt the feelings of;

‘She hurt me when she did not include me among her guests’; ‘This remark really bruised me ego’;

Batterverb

To wear or impair as if by beating or by hard usage.

Bruiseverb

break up into small pieces for food preparation;

‘bruise the berries with a wooden spoon and strain them’;

Batterverb

To flatten (metal) by hammering, so as to compress it inwardly and spread it outwardly.

Bruiseverb

damage (plant tissue) by abrasion of pressure;

‘The customer bruised the strawberries by squeezing them’;

Batterverb

To slope gently backward.

Bruisenoun

an injury appearing as an area of discoloured skin on the body, caused by a blow or impact rupturing underlying blood vessels

‘his body was a mass of bruises after he had been attacked’;

Batternoun

A semi-liquid mixture of several ingredients, as, flour, eggs, milk, etc., beaten together and used in cookery.

Bruisenoun

a mark indicating damage on a fruit, vegetable, or plant.

Batternoun

Paste of clay or loam.

Bruiseverb

inflict a bruise on (someone or something)

‘a bruised knee’;

Batternoun

A bruise on the face of a plate or of type in the form.

Bruiseverb

be susceptible to bruising

‘potatoes bruise easily, so treat them with care’;

Batternoun

A backward slope in the face of a wall or of a bank; receding slope.

Bruiseverb

hurt (someone's feelings)

‘she tried to bolster her bruised pride’;

Batternoun

The one who wields the bat in baseball; the one whose turn it is at bat; formerly called the batsman.

Bruiseverb

crush or pound (food)

‘the mix contains bruised oats’;

Batternoun

(baseball) a ballplayer who is batting

Bruise

A bruise, also known as a contusion, is a type of hematoma of tissue, the most common cause being capillaries damaged by trauma, causing localized bleeding that extravasates into the surrounding interstitial tissues. Most bruises are not very deep under the skin so that the bleeding causes a visible discoloration.

Batternoun

a flour mixture thin enough to pour or drop from a spoon

Batterverb

strike against forcefully;

‘Winds buffeted the tent’;

Batterverb

strike violently and repeatedly;

‘She clobbered the man who tried to attack her’;

Batterverb

make a dent or impression in;

‘dinge a soft hat’;

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