VS.

Baton vs. Batten

Published:

Batonnoun

A staff or truncheon, used for various purposes

‘the baton of a field marshal’;

Battenverb

(intransitive) To become better; improve in condition, especially by feeding.

Batonnoun

(music) The stick of a conductor in musical performances.

Battenverb

To feed (on); to revel (in).

Batonnoun

(sports) An object transferred by runners in a relay race.

Battenverb

(intransitive) To thrive by feeding; grow fat; feed oneself gluttonously.

ADVERTISEMENT

Batonnoun

(US) A short stout club used primarily by policemen; a truncheon UK.

Battenverb

(intransitive) To thrive, prosper, or live in luxury, especially at the expense of others; fare sumptuously.

‘Robber barons who battened on the poor’;

Batonnoun

(heraldry) An abatement in coats of arms to denote illegitimacy. (Also spelled batune, baston).

Battenverb

(intransitive) To gratify a morbid appetite or craving; gloat.

Batonnoun

(heraldry) A riband with the ends cut off, resembling a baton, as shown on a coat of arms.

Battenverb

(transitive) To improve by feeding; fatten; make fat or cause to thrive due to plenteous feeding.

ADVERTISEMENT

Batonnoun

A short vertical lightweight post, not set into the ground, used to separate wires in a fence.

Battenverb

(transitive) To fertilize or enrich, as land.

Batonverb

To strike with a baton.

Battenverb

To furnish with battens.

Batonnoun

A staff or truncheon, used for various purposes; as, the baton of a field marshal; the baton of a conductor in musical performances.

‘He held the baton of command.’;

Battenverb

(nautical) To fasten or secure a hatch etc using battens.

ADVERTISEMENT

Batonnoun

An ordinary with its ends cut off, borne sinister as a mark of bastardy, and containing one fourth in breadth of the bend sinister; - called also bastard bar. See Bend sinister.

Battennoun

A thin strip of wood used in construction to hold members of a structure together or to provide a fixing point.

Batonnoun

a thin tapered rod used by a conductor to direct an orchestra

Battennoun

(nautical) A long strip of wood, metal, fibreglass etc., used for various purposes aboard ship, especially one inserted in a pocket sewn on the sail in order to keep the sail flat.

Batonnoun

an implement passed from runner to runner in a relay race

Battennoun

In stagecraft, a long pipe, usually metal, affixed to the ceiling or fly system in a theater.

Battennoun

The movable bar of a loom, which strikes home or closes the threads of a woof.

Battenverb

To make fat by plenteous feeding; to fatten.

Battenverb

To fertilize or enrich, as land.

Battenverb

To grow fat; to grow fat in ease and luxury; to glut one's self.

‘The pampered monarch lay battening in ease.’; ‘Skeptics, with a taste for carrion, who batten on the hideous facts in history, - persecutions, inquisitions.’;

Battenverb

To furnish or fasten with battens.

Battennoun

A strip of sawed stuff, or a scantling;

Battennoun

The movable bar of a loom, which strikes home or closes the threads of a woof.

Battennoun

stuffing made of rolls or sheets of cotton wool or synthetic fiber

Battennoun

a strip fixed to something to hold it firm

Battenverb

furnish with battens;

‘batten ships’;

Battenverb

secure with battens;

‘batten down a ship's hatches’;

Batten

A batten is most commonly a strip of solid material, historically wood but can also be of plastic, metal, or fiberglass. Battens are variously used in construction, sailing, and other fields.

Batten Illustrations

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons