VS.

Barilla vs. Kelp

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Barillanoun

(botany) Any of several unrelated saltmarsh plants that were once burnt to obtain soda ash.

Kelpnoun

Any of several large brown seaweeds (order Laminariales).

Barillanoun

The alkali produced from the plant, an impure carbonate of soda, used for making soap, glass, etc., and for bleaching.

Kelpnoun

The calcined ashes of seaweed, formerly used in glass and iodine manufacture.

Barillanoun

Impure soda obtained from the ashes of any seashore plant, or kelp.

Kelpnoun

The calcined ashes of seaweed, - formerly much used in the manufacture of glass, now used in the manufacture of iodine.

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Barillanoun

A name given to several species of Salsola from which soda is made, by burning the barilla in heaps and lixiviating the ashes.

Kelpnoun

Any large blackish seaweed.

Barillanoun

The alkali produced from the plant, being an impure carbonate of soda, used for making soap, glass, etc., and for bleaching purposes.

Kelpnoun

large brown seaweeds having fluted leathery fronds

Barillanoun

bushy plant of Old World salt marshes and sea beaches having prickly leaves; burned to produce a crude soda ash

Kelp

Kelps are large brown algae seaweeds that make up the order Laminariales. There are about 30 different genera.

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Barillanoun

Algerian plant formerly burned to obtain calcium carbonate

Barilla

Barilla refers to several species of salt-tolerant (halophyte) plants that, until the 19th century, were the primary source of soda ash and hence of sodium carbonate. The word was also used directly to refer to the soda ash obtained from plant sources.

‘barilla’;

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