VS.

Bail vs. Bond

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Bailnoun

Security, usually a sum of money, exchanged for the release of an arrested person as a guarantee of that person's appearance for trial.

Bondnoun

(legal) Evidence of a long-term debt, by which the bond issuer (the borrower) is obliged to pay interest when due, and repay the principal at maturity, as specified on the face of the bond certificate. The rights of the holder are specified in the bond indenture, which contains the legal terms and conditions under which the bond was issued. Bonds are available in two forms: registered bonds, and bearer bonds.

Bailnoun

Release from imprisonment on payment of such money.

Bondnoun

(finance) A documentary obligation to pay a sum or to perform a contract; a debenture.

‘Many say that government and corporate bonds are a good investment to balance against a portfolio consisting primarily of stocks.’;

Bailnoun

The person providing such payment.

Bondnoun

A physical connection which binds, a band; often plural.

‘The prisoner was brought before the tribunal in iron bonds.’;

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Bailnoun

A bucket or scoop used for removing water from a boat etc.

Bondnoun

An emotional link, connection or union.

‘They had grown up as friends and neighbors, and not even vastly differing political views could break the bond of their friendship.’;

Bailnoun

A person who bails water out of a boat.

Bondnoun

Moral or political duty or obligation.

Bailnoun

(obsolete) Custody; keeping.

Bondnoun

(chemistry) A link or force between neighbouring atoms in a molecule.

‘Organic chemistry primarily consists of the study of carbon bonds, in their many variations.’;

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Bailnoun

A hoop, ring or handle (especially of a kettle or bucket).

Bondnoun

A binding agreement, a covenant.

‘You could rely on him. His word was his bond.’; ‘Herbert resented his wife for subjecting him to the bonds of matrimony; he claimed they had gotten married while drunk.’;

Bailnoun

A stall for a cow (or other animal) (usually tethered with a semi-circular hoop).

Bondnoun

A bail bond.

‘The bailiff released the prisoner as soon as the bond was posted.’;

Bailnoun

A hinged bar as a restraint for animals, or on a typewriter.

Bondnoun

Any constraining or cementing force or material.

‘A bond of superglue adhered the teacups to the ceiling, much to the consternation of the cafe owners.’;

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Bailnoun

A frame to restrain a cow during milking or feeding.

Bondnoun

(construction) In building, a specific pattern of bricklaying.

Bailnoun

A hoop, ring, or other object used to connect a pendant to a necklace.

Bondnoun

In Scotland, a mortgage.

Bailnoun

(cricket) One of the two wooden crosspieces that rest on top of the stumps to form a wicket.

Bondnoun

(railways) A heavy copper wire or rod connecting adjacent rails of an electric railway track when used as a part of the electric circuit.

Bailnoun

(furniture) Normally curved handle suspended between sockets as a drawer pull. This may also be on a kettle or pail.

Bondnoun

A peasant; churl.

Bailverb

To secure the release of an arrested person by providing bail.

Bondnoun

A vassal; serf; one held in bondage to a superior.

Bailverb

(legal) To release a person under such guarantee.

Bondverb

(transitive) To connect, secure or tie with a bond; to bind.

‘The gargantuan ape was bonded in iron chains and carted onto the stage.’;

Bailverb

(legal) To hand over personal property to be held temporarily by another as a bailment.

‘to bail cloth to a tailor to be made into a garment; to bail goods to a carrier’;

Bondverb

(transitive) To cause to adhere (one material with another).

‘The children bonded their snapshots to the scrapbook pages with mucilage.’;

Bailverb

To remove (water) from a boat by scooping it out.

‘to bail water out of a boat’;

Bondverb

To form a chemical compound with.

‘Under unusual conditions, even gold can be made to bond with other elements.’;

Bailverb

To remove water from (a boat) by scooping it out.

‘to bail a boat’;

Bondverb

(transitive) To guarantee or secure a financial risk.

‘The contractor was bonded with a local underwriter.’;

Bailverb

To set free; to deliver; to release.

Bondverb

To form a friendship or emotional connection.

‘The men had bonded while serving together in Vietnam.’;

Bailverb

(slang) To exit quickly.

‘With his engine in flames, the pilot had no choice but to bail.’;

Bondverb

(transitive) To put in a bonded warehouse.

Bailverb

(informal) To fail to meet a commitment.

Bondverb

To lay bricks in a specific pattern.

Bailverb

To secure the head of a cow during milking.

Bondverb

To make a reliable electrical connection between two conductors (or any pieces of metal that may potentially become conductors).

‘A house's distribution panel should always be bonded to the grounding rods via a panel bond.’;

Bailverb

(rare) To confine.

Bondverb

To bail out by means of a bail bond.

Bailverb

To secure (a cow) by placing its head in a bail for milking.

Bondadjective

Subject to the tenure called bondage.

Bailverb

To keep (a traveller) detained in order to rob them; to corner (a wild animal); loosely, to detain, hold up. (Usually with up.)

Bondadjective

In a state of servitude or slavedom; not free.

Bailnoun

A bucket or scoop used in bailing water out of a boat.

‘The bail of a canoe . . . made of a human skull.’;

Bondadjective

Servile; slavish; pertaining to or befitting a slave.

‘bond fear’;

Bailnoun

Custody; keeping.

‘Silly Faunus now within their bail.’;

Bondnoun

That which binds, ties, fastens, or confines, or by which anything is fastened or bound, as a cord, chain, etc.; a band; a ligament; a shackle or a manacle.

‘Gnawing with my teeth my bonds in sunder,I gained my freedom.’;

Bailnoun

The person or persons who procure the release of a prisoner from the custody of the officer, or from imprisonment, by becoming surety for his appearance in court.

‘The bail must be real, substantial bondsmen.’; ‘A. and B. were bail to the arrest in a suit at law.’;

Bondnoun

The state of being bound; imprisonment; captivity, restraint.

Bailnoun

The security given for the appearance of a prisoner in order to obtain his release from custody of the officer; as, the man is out on bail; to go bail for any one.

‘Excessive bail ought not to be required.’;

Bondnoun

A binding force or influence; a cause of union; a uniting tie; as, the bonds of fellowship.

‘A people with whom I have no tie but the common bond of mankind.’;

Bailnoun

The arched handle of a kettle, pail, or similar vessel, usually movable.

Bondnoun

Moral or political duty or obligation.

‘I love your majestyAccording to my bond, nor more nor less.’;

Bailnoun

A half hoop for supporting the cover of a carrier's wagon, awning of a boat, etc.

Bondnoun

A writing under seal, by which a person binds himself, his heirs, executors, and administrators, to pay a certain sum on or before a future day appointed. This is a single bond. But usually a condition is added, that, if the obligor shall do a certain act, appear at a certain place, conform to certain rules, faithfully perform certain duties, or pay a certain sum of money, on or before a time specified, the obligation shall be void; otherwise it shall remain in full force. If the condition is not performed, the bond becomes forfeited, and the obligor and his heirs are liable to the payment of the whole sum.

Bailnoun

A line of palisades serving as an exterior defense.

Bondnoun

A financial instrument (of the nature of the ordinary legal bond) made by a government or a corporation for purpose of borrowing money; a written promise to pay a specific sum of money on or before a specified day, given in return for a sum of money; as, a government, city, or railway bond.

Bailnoun

The outer wall of a feudal castle. Hence: The space inclosed by it; the outer court.

Bondnoun

The state of goods placed in a bonded warehouse till the duties are paid; as, merchandise in bond.

Bailnoun

A certain limit within a forest.

Bondnoun

The union or tie of the several stones or bricks forming a wall. The bricks may be arranged for this purpose in several different ways, as in English bond or block bond (Fig. 1), where one course consists of bricks with their ends toward the face of the wall, called headers, and the next course of bricks with their lengths parallel to the face of the wall, called stretchers; Flemish bond (Fig.2), where each course consists of headers and stretchers alternately, so laid as always to break joints; Cross bond, which differs from the English by the change of the second stretcher line so that its joints come in the middle of the first, and the same position of stretchers comes back every fifth line; Combined cross and English bond, where the inner part of the wall is laid in the one method, the outer in the other.

Bailnoun

A division for the stalls of an open stable.

Bondnoun

A unit of chemical attraction between atoms; as, oxygen has two bonds of affinity. Also called chemical bond. It is often represented in graphic formulæ by a short line or dash. See Diagram of Benzene nucleus, and Valence. Several types of bond are distinguished by chemists, as double bond, triple bond, covalent bond, hydrogen bond.

Bailnoun

The top or cross piece (or either of the two cross pieces) of the wicket.

Bondnoun

A heavy copper wire or rod connecting adjacent rails of an electric railway track when used as a part of the electric circuit.

Bailverb

To lade; to dip and throw; - usually with out; as, to bail water out of a boat.

‘Buckets . . . to bail out the water.’;

Bondnoun

League; association; confederacy.

‘The Africander Bond, a league or association appealing to African, but practically to Boer, patriotism.’;

Bailverb

To dip or lade water from; - often with out to express completeness; as, to bail a boat.

‘By the help of a small bucket and our hats we bailed her out.’;

Bondnoun

A vassal or serf; a slave.

Bailverb

To deliver; to release.

‘Ne none there was to rescue her, ne none to bail.’;

Bondverb

To place under the conditions of a bond; to mortgage; to secure the payment of the duties on (goods or merchandise) by giving a bond.

Bailverb

To set free, or deliver from arrest, or out of custody, on the undertaking of some other person or persons that he or they will be responsible for the appearance, at a certain day and place, of the person bailed.

Bondverb

To dispose in building, as the materials of a wall, so as to secure solidity.

Bailverb

To deliver, as goods in trust, for some special object or purpose, upon a contract, expressed or implied, that the trust shall be faithfully executed on the part of the bailee, or person intrusted; as, to bail cloth to a tailor to be made into a garment; to bail goods to a carrier.

Bondadjective

In a state of servitude or slavery; captive.

‘By one Spirit are we all baptized . . . whether we be Jews or Gentiles, whether we be bond or free.’;

Bailnoun

(criminal law) money that must be forfeited by the bondsman if an accused person fails to appear in court for trial;

‘the judge set bail at $10,000’; ‘a $10,000 bond was furnished by an alderman’;

Bondnoun

an electrical force linking atoms

Bailnoun

the legal system that allows an accused person to be temporarily released from custody (usually on condition that a sum of money guarantees their appearance at trial);

‘he is out on bail’;

Bondnoun

a certificate of debt (usually interest-bearing or discounted) that is issued by a government or corporation in order to raise money; the issuer is required to pay a fixed sum annually until maturity and then a fixed sum to repay the principal

Bailverb

release after a security has been paid

Bondnoun

a connection based on kinship or marriage or common interest;

‘the shifting alliances within a large family’; ‘their friendship constitutes a powerful bond between them’;

Bailverb

deliver something in trust to somebody for a special purpose and for a limited period

Bondnoun

(criminal law) money that must be forfeited by the bondsman if an accused person fails to appear in court for trial;

‘the judge set bail at $10,000’; ‘a $10,000 bond was furnished by an alderman’;

Bailverb

secure the release of (someone) by providing security

Bondnoun

a restraint that confines or restricts freedom (especially something used to tie down or restrain a prisoner)

Bailverb

empty (a vessel) by bailing

Bondnoun

a connection that fastens things together

Bailverb

remove (water) from a vessel with a container

Bondnoun

a superior quality of strong durable white writing paper; originally made for printing documents

Bailnoun

the temporary release of an accused person awaiting trial, sometimes on condition that a sum of money is lodged to guarantee their appearance in court

‘he has been released on bail’;

Bondnoun

United States civil rights leader who was elected to the legislature in Georgia but was barred from taking his seat because he opposed the Vietnam War (born 1940)

Bailnoun

money paid by or for someone in order to secure their release on bail

‘they feared the financier would be tempted to forfeit the £10 million bail and flee’;

Bondnoun

British secret operative 007 in novels by Ian Fleming

Bailnoun

either of the two crosspieces bridging the stumps, which the bowler and fielders try to dislodge with the ball to get the batsman out

‘the Lancashire captain was at full stretch as the wicketkeeper took off the bails’;

Bondnoun

the property of sticking together (as of glue and wood) or the joining of surfaces of different composition

Bailnoun

a bar on a typewriter or computer printer which holds the paper steady.

Bondverb

stick to firmly;

‘Will this wallpaper adhere to the wall?’;

Bailnoun

a fastening that secures a crampon to the sole of a boot.

Bondverb

create social or emotional ties;

‘The grandparents want to bond with the child’;

Bailnoun

a bar or pole separating horses in an open stable.

Bondverb

issue bonds on

Bailnoun

a movable framework for securing the head of a cow during milking.

Bondverb

bring together in a common cause or emotion;

‘The death of their child had drawn them together’;

Bailverb

release or secure the release of (a prisoner) on payment of bail

‘nine were bailed on drugs charges’; ‘his son called home to get bailed out of jail’; ‘he was bailed to appear at Durham Crown Court’;

Bondadjective

held in slavery;

‘born of enslaved parents’;

Bailverb

confront (someone) with the intention of robbing them

‘they bailed up Mr Dyason and demanded his money’;

Bailverb

detain (someone) in conversation, especially against their will

‘students will bail up Canberrans on Friday for donations for the Royal Blind Society’;

Bailverb

secure (a cow) during milking.

Bailverb

scoop water out of (a ship or boat)

‘the first priority is to bail out the boat with buckets’;

Bailverb

scoop (water) out of a ship or boat

‘I started to use my hands to bail out the water’;

Bailverb

abandon a commitment, obligation, or activity

‘I couldn't handle the crowds, so I bailed’; ‘he looks a little like the other guy that bailed on me’; ‘after 12 years of this, including Sunday Mass with the family, I bailed’;

Bail

Bail is a set of pre-trial restrictions that are imposed on a suspect to ensure that they will not hamper the judicial process. Bail is the conditional release of a defendant with the promise to appear in court when required.

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