VS.

Awareness vs. Knowledge

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Main Difference

The main difference between Awareness and Knowledge is that the Awareness is a state or ability to perceive, to feel, or to be conscious of events, objects, or sensory patterns and Knowledge is a familiarity, awareness, or understanding of someone or something (facts, information, descriptions, skills) which is acquired through experience or education by perceiving, discovering, or learning; theoretical or practical understanding of a subject

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Wikipedia
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  • Awareness (noun)

    The state or level of consciousness where sense data can be confirmed by an observer.

    "I gradually passed from sleep to full awareness."

  • Awareness (noun)

    The state or quality of being aware of something

    "The awareness of one type of idea naturally fosters an awareness of another idea"

  • Knowledge (noun)

    The fact of knowing about something; general understanding or familiarity with a subject, place, situation etc. from 14th c.

    "His knowledge of Iceland was limited to what he'd seen on the Travel Channel."

  • Knowledge (noun)

    Awareness of a particular fact or situation; a state of having been informed or made aware of something. from 14th c.

  • Knowledge (noun)

    Intellectual understanding; the state of appreciating truth or information. from 14th c.

    "Knowledge consists in recognizing the difference between good and bad decisions."

  • Knowledge (noun)

    Familiarity or understanding of a particular skill, branch of learning etc. from 14th c.

    "Does your friend have any knowledge of hieroglyphs, perchance?"

    "A secretary should have a good knowledge of shorthand."

  • Knowledge (noun)

    Justified true belief

  • Knowledge (noun)

    Sexual intimacy or intercourse (now usually in phrase carnal knowledge). from 15th c.

  • Knowledge (noun)

    Information or intelligence about something; notice. 15th-18th c.

  • Knowledge (noun)

    The total of what is known; all information and products of learning. from 16th c.

    "His library contained the accumulated knowledge of the Greeks and Romans."

  • Knowledge (noun)

    Something that can be known; a branch of learning; a piece of information; a science. from 16th c.

  • Knowledge (noun)

    Acknowledgement. 14th-16th c.

  • Knowledge (noun)

    Notice, awareness. 17th c.

  • Knowledge (noun)

    The deep familiarity with certain routes and places of interest required by taxicab drivers working in London, England.

  • Knowledge (verb)

    To confess as true; to acknowledge. 13th-17th c.

Wiktionary
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Oxford Dictionary
  • Awareness (noun)

    conscious knowledge; as, he had no awareness of his mistakes.

  • Awareness (noun)

    a state of elementary or undifferentiated consciousness; as, the crash intruded on his awareness.

  • Knowledge (noun)

    The act or state of knowing; clear perception of fact, truth, or duty; certain apprehension; familiar cognizance; cognition.

  • Knowledge (noun)

    That which is or may be known; the object of an act of knowing; a cognition; - chiefly used in the plural.

  • Knowledge (noun)

    That which is gained and preserved by knowing; instruction; acquaintance; enlightenment; learning; scholarship; erudition.

  • Knowledge (noun)

    That familiarity which is gained by actual experience; practical skill; as, a knowledge of life.

  • Knowledge (noun)

    Scope of information; cognizance; notice; as, it has not come to my knowledge.

  • Knowledge (noun)

    Sexual intercourse; - usually preceded by carnal; same as carnal knowledge.

  • Knowledge

    To acknowledge.

Webster Dictionary
  • Awareness (noun)

    having knowledge of;

    "he had no awareness of his mistakes"

    "his sudden consciousness of the problem he faced"

    "their intelligence and general knowingness was impressive"

  • Awareness (noun)

    state of elementary or undifferentiated consciousness;

    "the crash intruded on his awareness"

  • Knowledge (noun)

    the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning

Princeton's WordNet

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