VS.

Assume vs. Predict

Published:

Assumeverb

to authenticate by means of belief; to surmise; to suppose to be true, especially without proof

‘We assume that, as her parents were dentists, she knows quite a bit about dentistry.’;

Predictverb

(transitive) To make a prediction: to forecast, foretell, or estimate a future event on the basis of knowledge and reasoning; to prophesy a future event on the basis of mystical knowledge or power.

Assumeverb

to take on a position, duty or form

‘Mr. Jones will assume the position of a lifeguard until a proper replacement is found.’;

Predictverb

To imply.

Assumeverb

to adopt a feigned quality or manner

Predictverb

(intransitive) To make predictions.

ADVERTISEMENT

Assumeverb

to receive, adopt

Predictverb

To direct a ranged weapon against a target by means of a predictor.

Assumeverb

to adopt an idea or cause

Predictnoun

(obsolete) A prediction.

Assumeverb

To take to or upon one's self; to take formally and demonstratively; sometimes, to appropriate or take unjustly.

‘Trembling they stand while Jove assumes the throne.’; ‘The god assumed his native form again.’;

Predictverb

To tell or declare beforehand; to foretell; to prophesy; to presage; as, to predict misfortune; to predict the return of a comet.

ADVERTISEMENT

Assumeverb

To take for granted, or without proof; to suppose as a fact; to suppose or take arbitrarily or tentatively.

‘The consequences of assumed principles.’;

Predictnoun

A prediction.

Assumeverb

To pretend to possess; to take in appearance.

‘Ambition assuming the mask of religion.’; ‘Assume a virtue, if you have it not.’;

Predictverb

make a prediction about; tell in advance;

‘Call the outcome of an election’;

Assumeverb

To receive or adopt.

‘The sixth was a young knight of lesser renown and lower rank, assumed into that honorable company.’;

Predictverb

indicate by signs;

‘These signs bode bad news’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Assumeverb

To be arrogant or pretentious; to claim more than is due.

Assumeverb

To undertake, as by a promise.

Assumeverb

take to be the case or to be true; accept without verification or proof;

‘I assume his train was late’;

Assumeverb

take on titles, offices, duties, responsibilities;

‘When will the new President assume office?’;

Assumeverb

take on a certain form, attribute, or aspect;

‘His voice took on a sad tone’; ‘The story took a new turn’; ‘he adopted an air of superiority’; ‘She assumed strange manners’; ‘The gods assume human or animal form in these fables’;

Assumeverb

take on as one's own the expenses or debts of another person;

‘I'll accept the charges’; ‘She agreed to bear the responsibility’;

Assumeverb

occupy or take on;

‘He assumes the lotus position’; ‘She took her seat on the stage’; ‘We took our seats in the orchestra’; ‘She took up her position behind the tree’; ‘strike a pose’;

Assumeverb

seize and take control without authority and possibly with force; take as one's right or possession;

‘He assumed to himself the right to fill all positions in the town’; ‘he usurped my rights’; ‘She seized control of the throne after her husband died’;

Assumeverb

make a pretence of;

‘She assumed indifference, even though she was seething with anger’; ‘he feigned sleep’;

Assumeverb

Christianity, obsolete; take up someone's soul into heaven;

‘This is the day when May was assumed into heaven’;

Assumeverb

put clothing on one's body;

‘What should I wear today?’; ‘He put on his best suit for the wedding’; ‘The princess donned a long blue dress’; ‘The queen assumed the stately robes’; ‘He got into his jeans’;

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons