VS.

Assume vs. Duty

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Assumeverb

to authenticate by means of belief; to surmise; to suppose to be true, especially without proof

‘We assume that, as her parents were dentists, she knows quite a bit about dentistry.’;

Dutynoun

That which one is morally or legally obligated to do.

‘We don't have a duty to keep you here.’;

Assumeverb

to take on a position, duty or form

‘Mr. Jones will assume the position of a lifeguard until a proper replacement is found.’;

Dutynoun

A period of time spent at work or doing a particular task.

‘I’m on duty from 6 pm to 6 am.’;

Assumeverb

to adopt a feigned quality or manner

Dutynoun

Describing a workload as to its idle, working and de-energized periods.

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Assumeverb

to receive, adopt

Dutynoun

A tax placed on imports or exports; a tariff.

‘customs duty; excise duty’;

Assumeverb

to adopt an idea or cause

Dutynoun

(obsolete) One's due, something one is owed; a debt or fee.

Assumeverb

To take to or upon one's self; to take formally and demonstratively; sometimes, to appropriate or take unjustly.

‘Trembling they stand while Jove assumes the throne.’; ‘The god assumed his native form again.’;

Dutynoun

(obsolete) Respect; reverence; regard; act of respect; homage.

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Assumeverb

To take for granted, or without proof; to suppose as a fact; to suppose or take arbitrarily or tentatively.

‘The consequences of assumed principles.’;

Dutynoun

The efficiency of an engine, especially a steam pumping engine, as measured by work done by a certain quantity of fuel; usually, the number of pounds of water lifted one foot by one bushel of coal (94 lbs. old standard), or by 1 cwt. (112 lbs., England, or 100 lbs., United States).

Assumeverb

To pretend to possess; to take in appearance.

‘Ambition assuming the mask of religion.’; ‘Assume a virtue, if you have it not.’;

Dutynoun

That which is due; payment.

‘When thou receivest money for thy labor or ware, thou receivest thy duty.’;

Assumeverb

To receive or adopt.

‘The sixth was a young knight of lesser renown and lower rank, assumed into that honorable company.’;

Dutynoun

That which a person is bound by moral obligation to do, or refrain from doing; that which one ought to do; service morally obligatory.

‘Forgetting his duty toward God, his sovereign lord, and his country.’;

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Assumeverb

To be arrogant or pretentious; to claim more than is due.

Dutynoun

Hence, any assigned service or business; as, the duties of a policeman, or a soldier; to be on duty.

‘With records sweet of duties done.’; ‘To employ him on the hardest and most imperative duty.’; ‘Duty is a graver term than obligation. A duty hardly exists to do trivial things; but there may be an obligation to do them.’;

Assumeverb

To undertake, as by a promise.

Dutynoun

Specifically, obedience or submission due to parents and superiors.

Assumeverb

take to be the case or to be true; accept without verification or proof;

‘I assume his train was late’;

Dutynoun

Respect; reverence; regard; act of respect; homage.

Assumeverb

take on titles, offices, duties, responsibilities;

‘When will the new President assume office?’;

Dutynoun

The efficiency of an engine, especially a steam pumping engine, as measured by work done by a certain quantity of fuel; usually, the number of pounds of water lifted one foot by one bushel of coal (94 lbs. old standard), or by 1 cwt. (112 lbs., England, or 100 lbs., United States).

Assumeverb

take on a certain form, attribute, or aspect;

‘His voice took on a sad tone’; ‘The story took a new turn’; ‘he adopted an air of superiority’; ‘She assumed strange manners’; ‘The gods assume human or animal form in these fables’;

Dutynoun

Tax, toll, impost, or customs; excise; any sum of money required by government to be paid on the importation, exportation, or consumption of goods.

Assumeverb

take on as one's own the expenses or debts of another person;

‘I'll accept the charges’; ‘She agreed to bear the responsibility’;

Dutynoun

work that you are obliged to perform for moral or legal reasons;

‘the duties of the job’;

Assumeverb

occupy or take on;

‘He assumes the lotus position’; ‘She took her seat on the stage’; ‘We took our seats in the orchestra’; ‘She took up her position behind the tree’; ‘strike a pose’;

Dutynoun

the social force that binds you to your obligations and the courses of action demanded by that force;

‘we must instill a sense of duty in our children’; ‘every right implies a responsibility; every opportunity, an obligation; every possession, a duty’;

Assumeverb

seize and take control without authority and possibly with force; take as one's right or possession;

‘He assumed to himself the right to fill all positions in the town’; ‘he usurped my rights’; ‘She seized control of the throne after her husband died’;

Dutynoun

a government tax on imports or exports;

‘they signed a treaty to lower duties on trade between their countries’;

Assumeverb

make a pretence of;

‘She assumed indifference, even though she was seething with anger’; ‘he feigned sleep’;

Duty

A duty (from meaning Old French: deu, did, past participle of devoir; Latin: debere, debitum, whence ) is a commitment or expectation to perform some action in general or if certain circumstances arise. A duty may arise from a system of ethics or morality, especially in an honor culture.

‘due’; ‘that which is owing’; ‘debt’;

Assumeverb

Christianity, obsolete; take up someone's soul into heaven;

‘This is the day when May was assumed into heaven’;

Assumeverb

put clothing on one's body;

‘What should I wear today?’; ‘He put on his best suit for the wedding’; ‘The princess donned a long blue dress’; ‘The queen assumed the stately robes’; ‘He got into his jeans’;

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