VS.

Anchor vs. Emcee

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Anchornoun

(nautical) A tool used to moor a vessel to the bottom of a sea or river to resist movement.

Emceenoun

in its senses as

Anchornoun

(nautical) An iron device so shaped as to grip the bottom and hold a vessel at her berth by the chain or rope attached. (FM 55-501).

Emceenoun

Master of ceremonies.

Anchornoun

(nautical) The combined anchoring gear (anchor, rode, bill/peak and fittings such as bitts, cat, and windlass.)

Emceenoun

(music) A rapper.

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Anchornoun

(heraldry) Representation of the nautical tool, used as a heraldic charge.

Emceeverb

(ambitransitive) To act as the master of ceremonies (for).

Anchornoun

Any instrument serving a purpose like that of a ship's anchor, such as an arrangement of timber to hold a dam fast; a device to hold the end of a bridge cable etc.; or a device used in metalworking to hold the core of a mould in place.

Emceeverb

To rap as part of a hip-hop performance.

Anchornoun

(Internet) A marked point in a document that can be the target of a hyperlink.

Emceenoun

a person who acts as host at formal occasions (makes an introductory speech and introduces other speakers)

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Anchornoun

(television) An anchorman or anchorwoman.

Emceeverb

act as a master of ceremonies

Anchornoun

(athletics) The final runner in a relay race.

Emceenoun

a master of ceremonies

‘a tuxedoed emcee strode to the middle of the stage’;

Anchornoun

(archery) A point that is touched by the draw hand or string when the bow is fully drawn and ready to shoot.

Emceenoun

an MC at a club or party.

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Anchornoun

(economics) A superstore or other facility that serves as a focus to bring customers into an area.

Emceeverb

act as a master of ceremonies at (an entertainment or large social occasion)

‘he was scheduled to emcee Sunday's award show’;

Anchornoun

(figurative) That which gives stability or security.

Emceeverb

perform as an MC

‘I ran the contest while Alex emceed from the DJ booth’;

Anchornoun

(architecture) A metal tie holding adjoining parts of a building together.

Anchornoun

(architecture) Carved work, somewhat resembling an anchor or arrowhead; part of the ornaments of certain mouldings. It is seen in the echinus, or egg-and-anchor (called also egg-and-dart, egg-and-tongue) ornament.

Anchornoun

One of the anchor-shaped spicules of certain sponges.

Anchornoun

One of the calcareous spinules of certain holothurians, as in species of Synapta.

Anchornoun

(cartomancy) The thirty-fifth Lenormand card.

Anchornoun

(obsolete) An anchorite or anchoress.

Anchorverb

To connect an object, especially a ship or a boat, to a fixed point.

Anchorverb

To cast anchor; to come to anchor.

‘Our ship (or the captain) anchored in the stream.’;

Anchorverb

To stop; to fix or rest.

Anchorverb

To provide emotional stability for a person in distress.

Anchorverb

To perform as an anchorman or anchorwoman.

Anchorverb

To be stuck; to be unable to move away from a position.

Anchornoun

A iron instrument which is attached to a ship by a cable (rope or chain), and which, being cast overboard, lays hold of the earth by a fluke or hook and thus retains the ship in a particular station.

Anchornoun

Any instrument or contrivance serving a purpose like that of a ship's anchor, as an arrangement of timber to hold a dam fast; a contrivance to hold the end of a bridge cable, or other similar part; a contrivance used by founders to hold the core of a mold in place.

Anchornoun

Fig.: That which gives stability or security; that on which we place dependence for safety.

‘Which hope we have as an anchor of the soul.’;

Anchornoun

An emblem of hope.

Anchornoun

A metal tie holding adjoining parts of a building together.

Anchornoun

One of the anchor-shaped spicules of certain sponges; also, one of the calcareous spinules of certain Holothurians, as in species of Synapta.

Anchornoun

an achorman, anchorwoman, or anchorperson.

Anchornoun

An anchoret.

Anchorverb

To place at anchor; to secure by an anchor; as, to anchor a ship.

Anchorverb

To fix or fasten; to fix in a stable condition; as, to anchor the cables of a suspension bridge.

‘Till that my nails were anchored in thine eyes.’;

Anchorverb

To cast anchor; to come to anchor; as, our ship (or the captain) anchored in the stream.

Anchorverb

To stop; to fix or rest.

‘My invention . . . anchors on Isabel.’;

Anchornoun

a mechanical device that prevents a vessel from moving

Anchornoun

a central cohesive source of support and stability;

‘faith is his anchor’; ‘the keystone of campaign reform was the ban on soft money’; ‘he is the linchpin of this firm’;

Anchornoun

a television reporter who coordinates a broadcast to which several correspondents contribute

Anchorverb

fix firmly and stably;

‘anchor the lamppost in concrete’;

Anchorverb

secure a vessel with an anchor;

‘We anchored at Baltimore’;

Anchornoun

a heavy object attached to a cable or chain and used to moor a ship to the sea bottom, typically having a metal shank with a pair of curved, barbed flukes at one end

‘the boat, no longer held fast by its anchor, swung wildly’; ‘an anchor chain’;

Anchornoun

a person or thing that provides stability or confidence in an otherwise uncertain situation

‘the European Community is the economic anchor of the New Europe’;

Anchornoun

a large and prestigious department store prominently sited in a new shopping centre.

Anchornoun

the brakes of a car

‘this idiot in front slammed on his anchors at a crossing’;

Anchornoun

an anchorman or anchorwoman

‘he signed off after nineteen years as CBS news anchor’;

Anchorverb

moor (a ship) to the sea bottom with an anchor

‘we anchored in the harbour’; ‘the ship was anchored in the lee of the island’;

Anchorverb

secure firmly in position

‘the tail is used as a hook with which the fish anchors itself to coral’;

Anchorverb

provide with a firm basis or foundation

‘it is important that policy be anchored to some acceptable theoretical basis’;

Anchorverb

present and coordinate (a television or radio programme)

‘she anchored a television documentary series in the early 1980s’;

Anchor

An anchor is a device, normally made of metal, used to secure a vessel to the bed of a body of water to prevent the craft from drifting due to wind or current. The word derives from Latin ancora, which itself comes from the Greek ἄγκυρα (ankȳra).Anchors can either be temporary or permanent.

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