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Anadiplosis vs. Epistrophe

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Anadiplosisnoun

(rhetoric) A figure of speech in which a word or phrase used at the end of a clause or expression is repeated near the beginning of the next clause or expression.

Epistrophenoun

(rhetoric) The repetition of the same word or words at the end of successive phrases, clauses or sentences.

Anadiplosisnoun

A repetition of the last word or any prominent word in a sentence or clause, at the beginning of the next, with an adjunct idea; as, "He retained his virtues amidst all his misfortunes - misfortunes which no prudence could foresee or prevent."

Epistrophenoun

A figure in which successive clauses end with the same word or affirmation; e. g., "Are they Hebrews? so am I. Are they Israelites? so am I."

Anadiplosisnoun

repetition of the final words of a sentence or line at the beginning of the next

Epistrophenoun

repetition of the ends of two or more successive sentences, verses, etc.

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Anadiplosis

Anadiplosis ( AN-ə-di-PLOH-sis; Greek: ἀναδίπλωσις, anadíplōsis, ) is the repetition of the last word of a preceding clause. The word is used at the end of a sentence and then used again at the beginning of the next sentence.

‘a doubling, folding up’;

Epistrophe

Epistrophe (Greek: ἐπιστροφή, ) is the repetition of the same word or words at the end of successive phrases, clauses or sentences. It is also known as epiphora and occasionally as antistrophe.

‘return’;

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