VS.

Amphiboly vs. Equivocation

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Amphibolynoun

(grammar) An ambiguous grammatical construction.

Equivocationnoun

(logic) A logical fallacy resulting from the use of multiple meanings of a single expression.

Amphibolynoun

Ambiguous discourse; amphibology.

‘If it oracle contrary to our interest or humor, we will create an amphiboly, a double meaning where there is none.’;

Equivocationnoun

The use of expressions susceptible of a double signification, possibly intentionally and with the aim of misleading.

Amphibolynoun

an ambiguous grammatical construction; e.g., `they are flying planes' can mean either that someone is flying planes or that something is flying planes

Equivocationnoun

The use of expressions susceptible of a double signification, with a purpose to mislead.

‘There being no room for equivocations, there is no need of distinctions.’;

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Equivocationnoun

a statement that is not literally false but that cleverly avoids an unpleasant truth

Equivocationnoun

intentionally vague or ambiguous

Equivocationnoun

falsification by means of vague or ambiguous language

Equivocation

In logic, equivocation () is an informal fallacy resulting from the use of a particular word/expression in multiple senses within an argument.It is a type of ambiguity that stems from a phrase having two or more distinct meanings, not from the grammar or structure of the sentence.

‘calling two different things by the same name’;

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