VS.

Aliment vs. Sickness

Published:

Alimentnoun

Food.

Sicknessnoun

The quality or state of being sick or diseased; illness.

‘I do lament the sickness of the king. -William Shakespeare’; ‘Trust not too much your now resistless charms; Those, age or sickness soon or late disarms. -Alexander Pope.’; ‘Sickness is a dangerous indulgence at my time of life. -Jane Austen.’;

Alimentnoun

(figuratively) Nourishment, sustenance.

Sicknessnoun

Nausea; qualmishness; as, sickness of stomach.

Alimentnoun

(Scotland) An allowance for maintenance; alimony.

Sicknessnoun

(linguistics) The analogical misuse of a rarer or marked grammatical case in the place of a more common or unmarked case.

ADVERTISEMENT

Alimentverb

(obsolete) To feed, nourish.

Sicknessnoun

The quality or state of being sick or diseased; illness; sisease or malady.

‘I do lament the sickness of the king.’; ‘Trust not too much your now resistless charms;Those, age or sickness soon or late disarms.’;

Alimentverb

To sustain, support.

Sicknessnoun

Nausea; qualmishness; as, sickness of stomach.

Alimentnoun

That which nourishes; food; nutriment; anything which feeds or adds to a substance in natural growth. Hence: The necessaries of life generally: sustenance; means of support.

‘Aliments of their sloth and weakness.’;

Sicknessnoun

impairment of normal physiological function affecting part or all of an organism

ADVERTISEMENT

Alimentnoun

An allowance for maintenance.

Sicknessnoun

the state that precedes vomiting

Alimentverb

To nourish; to support.

Alimentverb

To provide for the maintenance of.

Alimentnoun

a source of materials to nourish the body

Alimentverb

give nourishment to

ADVERTISEMENT

Alimentnoun

food; nourishment.

Alimentnoun

maintenance; alimony.

Aliment

Aliment, in Scots law and in other civil systems, is the sum of money paid, or allowance given in respect of the reciprocal obligation of parents and children, husband and wife, grandparents and grandchildren, to contribute to each other's maintenance. The term aliment is also used in regards to a similar obligation of other parties, as of creditors to imprisoned debtors, the payments by parishes to paupers, etc.

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons