VS.

Act vs. Roll

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Actnoun

(countable) Something done, a deed.

‘an act of goodwill’;

Rollverb

(ergative) To cause to revolve by turning over and over; to move by turning on an axis; to impel forward by causing to turn over and over on a supporting surface.

‘To roll a wheel, a ball, or a barrel.’;

Actnoun

Actuality.

Rollverb

(intransitive) To turn over and over.

‘The child will roll on the floor.’;

Actnoun

(countable) A product of a legislative body, a statute.

Rollverb

To tumble in gymnastics; to do a somersault.

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Actnoun

The process of doing something.

‘He was caught in the act of stealing.’;

Rollverb

(transitive) To wrap (something) round on itself; to form into a spherical or cylindrical body by causing to turn over and over.

‘To roll a sheet of paper; to roll clay or putty into a ball.’;

Actnoun

(countable) A formal or official record of something done.

Rollverb

(transitive) To bind or involve by winding, as in a bandage; to enwrap; often with up.

‘To roll up the map for shipping.’;

Actnoun

(countable) A division of a theatrical performance.

‘The pivotal moment in the play was in the first scene of the second act.’;

Rollverb

(intransitive) To be wound or formed into a cylinder or ball.

‘The cloth rolls unevenly; the snow rolls well.’;

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Actnoun

(countable) A performer or performers in a show.

‘Which act did you prefer? The soloist or the band?’;

Rollverb

(ergative) To drive or impel forward with an easy motion, as of rolling.

‘This river will roll its waters to the ocean.’;

Actnoun

(countable) Any organized activity.

Rollverb

(ergative) To utter copiously, especially with sounding words; to utter with a deep sound; — often with forth, or out.

‘To roll forth someone's praises; to roll out sentences.’;

Actnoun

(countable) A display of behaviour.

Rollverb

To press or level with a roller; to spread or form with a roll, roller, or rollers.

‘to roll a field;’; ‘to roll paste;’; ‘to roll steel rails.’;

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Actnoun

A thesis maintained in public, in some English universities, by a candidate for a degree, or to show the proficiency of a student.

Rollverb

(intransitive) To spread itself under a roller or rolling-pin.

‘The pastry rolls well.’;

Actnoun

(countable) A display of behaviour meant to deceive.

‘to put on an act’;

Rollverb

(ergative) To move, or cause to be moved, upon, or by means of, rollers or small wheels.

Actverb

(intransitive) To do something.

‘If you don't act soon, you will be in trouble.’;

Rollverb

To leave or begin a journey.

‘I want to get there early; let's roll.’;

Actverb

To do (something); to perform.

Rollverb

To compete, especially with vigor.

‘OK guys, we're only down by two points. Let's roll!’;

Actverb

(intransitive) To perform a theatrical role.

‘I started acting at the age of eleven in my local theatre.’;

Rollverb

To beat with rapid, continuous strokes, as a drum; to sound a roll upon.

Actverb

(ergative) Of a play: to be acted out (well or badly).

Rollverb

(geometry) To apply (one line or surface) to another without slipping; to bring all the parts of (one line or surface) into successive contact with another, in such a manner that at every instant the parts that have been in contact are equal.

Actverb

(intransitive) To behave in a certain way.

‘He's acting strangely - I think there's something wrong with him.’;

Rollverb

To turn over in one's mind; to revolve.

Actverb

(copulative) To convey an appearance of being.

‘He acted unconcerned so the others wouldn't worry.’;

Rollverb

To behave in a certain way; to adopt a general disposition toward a situation.

‘I was going to kick his ass, but he wasn't worth getting all worked up over; I don't roll like that.’;

Actverb

To do something that causes a change binding on the doer.

‘act on behalf of John’;

Rollverb

To throw dice.

Actverb

To have an effect (on).

‘High-pressure oxygen acts on the central nervous system and may cause convulsions or death.’; ‘Gravitational force acts on heavy bodies.’;

Rollverb

To roll dice such that they form a given pattern or total.

‘If you roll doubles, you get an extra turn.’; ‘With two dice, you're more likely to roll seven than ten.’;

Actverb

(transitive) To play (a role).

‘He's been acting Shakespearean leads since he was twelve.’;

Rollverb

(RPG) To create a new character in a role-playing game, especially by using dice to determine properties.

‘I'm gonna go and roll a new shaman tonight.’;

Actverb

(transitive) To feign.

‘He acted the angry parent, but was secretly amused.’;

Rollverb

(computing) To generate a random number.

Actverb

To map via a homomorphism to a group of automorphisms (of).

‘This group acts on the circle, so it can't be left-orderable!’;

Rollverb

To rotate on its fore-and-aft axis, causing its sides to go up and down. Compare with pitch.

Actverb

To move to action; to actuate; to animate.

Rollverb

(in folk songs) To travel by sailing.

Actnoun

That which is done or doing; the exercise of power, or the effect, of which power exerted is the cause; a performance; a deed.

‘That best portion of a good man's life,His little, nameless, unremembered actsOf kindness and of love.’;

Rollverb

(transitive) To beat up; to attack and cause physical damage to.

Actnoun

A state of reality or real existence as opposed to a possibility or possible existence.

‘The seeds of plants are not at first in act, but in possibility, what they afterward grow to be.’;

Rollverb

To cause to betray secrets or to testify for the prosecution.

‘The feds rolled him by giving him a free pass for most of what he'd done.’;

Actnoun

Process of doing; action. In act, in the very doing; on the point of (doing).

‘This woman was taken . . . in the very act.’;

Rollverb

To betray secrets.

‘He rolled on those guys after being in jail two days.’;

Actverb

To move to action; to actuate; to animate.

‘Self-love, the spring of motion, acts the soul.’;

Rollverb

(slang) To be under the influence of MDMA (a psychedelic stimulant, also known as ecstasy).

Actverb

To perform; to execute; to do.

‘That we act our temporal affairs with a desire no greater than our necessity.’; ‘Industry doth beget by producing good habits, and facility of acting things expedient for us to do.’; ‘Uplifted hands that at convenient timesCould act extortion and the worst of crimes.’;

Rollverb

To film.

‘The cameras are rolling.’;

Actverb

To perform, as an actor; to represent dramatically on the stage.

Rollverb

To slip past (a defender) with the ball.

Actverb

To assume the office or character of; to play; to personate; as, to act the hero.

Rollverb

To have a rolling aspect.

‘the hills rolled on’;

Actverb

To feign or counterfeit; to simulate.

‘With acted fear the villain thus pursued.’;

Rollverb

To perform a periodical revolution; to move onward as with a revolution.

‘The years roll on.’;

Actverb

To exert power; to produce an effect; as, the stomach acts upon food.

Rollverb

To move, like waves or billows, with alternate swell and depression.

Actverb

To perform actions; to fulfill functions; to put forth energy; to move, as opposed to remaining at rest; to carry into effect a determination of the will.

‘He hangs between, in doubt to act or rest.’;

Rollverb

to move and cause an effect on someone

Actverb

To behave or conduct, as in morals, private duties, or public offices; to bear or deport one's self; as, we know not why he has acted so.

Rollverb

(intransitive) To make a loud or heavy rumbling noise.

‘The thunder rolled and the lightning flashed.’;

Actverb

To perform on the stage; to represent a character.

‘To show the world how Garrick did not act.’;

Rollverb

To utter with an alveolar trill.

‘Many languages roll their r's.’;

Actnoun

a legal document codifying the result of deliberations of a committee or society or legislative body

Rollverb

To enrobe in toilet-paper (as a prank or spectacle).

‘The kids rolled the principal's house and yard.’;

Actnoun

something that people do or cause to happen

Rollverb

To create a customized version of something.

Actnoun

a subdivision of a play or opera or ballet

Rollverb

2010, page 208, [https://books.google.com/books?id=Io7hHlVN3qQC&pg=PA208&dq=%22roll%22]

Actnoun

a short theatrical performance that is part of a longer program;

‘he did his act three times every evening’; ‘she had a catchy little routine’; ‘it was one of the best numbers he ever did’;

Rollnoun

The act or result of rolling, or state of being rolled.

‘the roll of a ball’; ‘Look at the roll of the waves.’; ‘a roll of parchment’;

Actnoun

a manifestation of insincerity;

‘he put on quite an act for her benefit’;

Rollnoun

A forward or backward roll in gymnastics; going head over heels. A tumble.

Actverb

perform an action, or work out or perform (an action);

‘think before you act’; ‘We must move quickly’; ‘The governor should act on the new energy bill’; ‘The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel’;

Rollnoun

That which rolls; a roller.

Actverb

behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself;

‘You should act like an adult’; ‘Don't behave like a fool’; ‘What makes her do this way?’; ‘The dog acts ferocious, but he is really afraid of people’;

Rollnoun

A heavy cylinder used to break clods.

Actverb

play a role or part;

‘Gielgud played Hamlet’; ‘She wants to act Lady Macbeth, but she is too young for the role’; ‘She played the servant to her husband's master’;

Rollnoun

One of a set of revolving cylinders, or rollers, between which metal is pressed, formed, or smoothed, as in a rolling mill.

‘to pass rails through the rolls’;

Actverb

discharge one's duties;

‘She acts as the chair’; ‘In what capacity are you acting?’;

Rollnoun

That which is rolled up.

‘a roll of fat, of wool, paper, cloth, etc.’;

Actverb

pretend to have certain qualities or state of mind;

‘He acted the idiot’; ‘She plays deaf when the news are bad’;

Rollnoun

A document written on a piece of parchment, paper, or other materials which may be rolled up; a scroll.

Actverb

be suitable for theatrical performance;

‘This scene acts well’;

Rollnoun

Hence, an official or public document; a register; a record; also, a catalogue; a list.

Actverb

have an effect or outcome; often the one desired or expected;

‘The voting process doesn't work as well as people thought’; ‘How does your idea work in practice?’; ‘This method doesn't work’; ‘The breaks of my new car act quickly’; ‘The medicine works only if you take it with a lot of water’;

Rollnoun

A quantity of cloth wound into a cylindrical form.

‘a roll of carpeting; a roll of ribbon’;

Actverb

be engaged in an activity, often for no particular purpose other than pleasure

Rollnoun

A cylindrical twist of tobacco.

Actverb

behave unnaturally or affectedly;

‘She's just acting’;

Rollnoun

A kind of shortened raised biscuit or bread, often rolled or doubled upon itself; see also bread roll.

Actverb

perform on a stage or theater;

‘She acts in this play’; ‘He acted in `Julius Caesar'’; ‘I played in `A Christmas Carol'’;

Rollnoun

The oscillating movement of a nautical vessel as it rotates from side to side, on its fore-and-aft axis, causing its sides to go up and down, as distinguished from the alternate rise and fall of bow and stern called pitching; or the equivalent in an aircraft.

Rollnoun

(nautical) The measure or extent to which a vessel rotates from side to side, on its fore-and-aft axis.

Rollnoun

A heavy, reverberatory sound.

‘Hear the roll of cannon.’; ‘Hear the roll of thunder.’;

Rollnoun

The uniform beating of a drum with strokes so rapid as scarcely to be distinguished by the ear.

Rollnoun

(obsolete) Part; office; duty; rôle.

Rollnoun

A measure of parchments, containing five dozen.

Rollnoun

The rotation angle about the longitudinal axis.

‘Calculate the roll of that aircraft.’;

Rollnoun

The act of, or total resulting from, rolling one or more dice.

‘Make your roll.’; ‘Whoever gets the highest roll moves first.’;

Rollnoun

A winning streak of continuing luck, especially at gambling and especially in the phrase on a roll.

‘He is on a roll tonight.’;

Rollnoun

A training match for a fighting dog.

Rollverb

To cause to revolve by turning over and over; to move by turning on an axis; to impel forward by causing to turn over and over on a supporting surface; as, to roll a wheel, a ball, or a barrel.

Rollverb

To wrap round on itself; to form into a spherical or cylindrical body by causing to turn over and over; as, to roll a sheet of paper; to roll parchment; to roll clay or putty into a ball.

Rollverb

To bind or involve by winding, as in a bandage; to inwrap; - often with up; as, to roll up a parcel.

Rollverb

To drive or impel forward with an easy motion, as of rolling; as, a river rolls its waters to the ocean.

‘The flood of Catholic reaction was rolled over Europe.’;

Rollverb

To utter copiously, esp. with sounding words; to utter with a deep sound; - often with forth, or out; as, to roll forth some one's praises; to roll out sentences.

‘Who roll'd the psalm to wintry skies.’;

Rollverb

To press or level with a roller; to spread or form with a roll, roller, or rollers; as, to roll a field; to roll paste; to roll steel rails, etc.

Rollverb

To move, or cause to be moved, upon, or by means of, rollers or small wheels.

Rollverb

To beat with rapid, continuous strokes, as a drum; to sound a roll upon.

Rollverb

To apply (one line or surface) to another without slipping; to bring all the parts of (one line or surface) into successive contact with another, in suck manner that at every instant the parts that have been in contact are equal.

Rollverb

To turn over in one's mind; to revolve.

‘Full oft in heart he rolleth up and downThe beauty of these florins new and bright.’;

Rollverb

To move, as a curved object may, along a surface by rotation without sliding; to revolve upon an axis; to turn over and over; as, a ball or wheel rolls on the earth; a body rolls on an inclined plane.

‘And her foot, look you, is fixed upon a spherical stone, which rolls, and rolls, and rolls.’;

Rollverb

To move on wheels; as, the carriage rolls along the street.

Rollverb

To be wound or formed into a cylinder or ball; as, the cloth rolls unevenly; the snow rolls well.

Rollverb

To fall or tumble; - with over; as, a stream rolls over a precipice.

Rollverb

To perform a periodical revolution; to move onward as with a revolution; as, the rolling year; ages roll away.

Rollverb

To turn; to move circularly.

‘And his red eyeballs roll with living fire.’;

Rollverb

To move, as waves or billows, with alternate swell and depression.

‘What different sorrows did within thee roll.’;

Rollverb

To incline first to one side, then to the other; to rock; as, there is a great difference in ships about rolling; in a general semse, to be tossed about.

‘Twice ten tempestuous nights I rolled.’;

Rollverb

To turn over, or from side to side, while lying down; to wallow; as, a horse rolls.

Rollverb

To spread under a roller or rolling-pin; as, the paste rolls well.

Rollverb

To beat a drum with strokes so rapid that they can scarcely be distinguished by the ear.

Rollverb

To make a loud or heavy rumbling noise; as, the thunder rolls.

‘Man shall not suffer his wife go roll about.’;

Rollnoun

The act of rolling, or state of being rolled; as, the roll of a ball; the roll of waves.

Rollnoun

That which rolls; a roller.

Rollnoun

That which is rolled up; as, a roll of fat, of wool, paper, cloth, etc.

‘Busy angels spreadThe lasting roll, recording what we say.’;

Rollnoun

Hence, an official or public document; a register; a record; also, a catalogue; a list.

‘The rolls of Parliament, the entry of the petitions, answers, and transactions in Parliament, are extant.’; ‘The roll and list of that army doth remain.’;

Rollnoun

A kind of shortened raised biscuit or bread, often rolled or doubled upon itself.

Rollnoun

A quantity of cloth wound into a cylindrical form; as, a roll of carpeting; a roll of ribbon.

Rollnoun

The oscillating movement of a vessel from side to side, in sea way, as distinguished from the alternate rise and fall of bow and stern called pitching.

Rollnoun

A heavy, reverberatory sound; as, the roll of cannon, or of thunder.

Rollnoun

The uniform beating of a drum with strokes so rapid as scarcely to be distinguished by the ear.

Rollnoun

Part; office; duty; rôle.

Rollnoun

rotary motion of an object around its own axis;

‘wheels in axial rotation’;

Rollnoun

a list of names;

‘his name was struck off the rolls’;

Rollnoun

a long heavy sea wave as it advances towards the shore

Rollnoun

photographic film rolled up inside a container to protect it from light

Rollnoun

a round shape formed by a series of concentric circles

Rollnoun

a roll of currency notes (often taken as the resources of a person or business etc.);

‘he shot his roll on a bob-tailed nag’;

Rollnoun

small rounded bread either plain or sweet

Rollnoun

a deep prolonged sound (as of thunder or large bells)

Rollnoun

the sound of a drum (especially a snare drum) beaten rapidly and continuously

Rollnoun

a document that can be rolled up (as for storage)

Rollnoun

the act of throwing dice

Rollnoun

walking with a rolling gait

Rollnoun

a flight maneuver; aircraft rotates about its longitudinal axis without changing direction or losing altitude

Rollnoun

the act of rolling something (as the ball in bowling)

Rollverb

move by turning over or rotating;

‘The child rolled down the hill’; ‘turn over on your left side’;

Rollverb

move along on or as if on wheels or a wheeled vehicle;

‘The President's convoy rolled past the crowds’;

Rollverb

occur in soft rounded shapes;

‘The hills rolled past’;

Rollverb

flatten or spread with a roller;

‘roll out the paper’;

Rollverb

emit, produce, or utter with a deep prolonged reverberating sound;

‘The thunder rolled’; ‘rolling drums’;

Rollverb

wrap or coil around;

‘roll your hair around your finger’; ‘Twine the thread around the spool’;

Rollverb

begin operating or running;

‘The cameras were rolling’; ‘The presses are already rolling’;

Rollverb

shape by rolling;

‘roll a cigarette’;

Rollverb

execute a roll, in tumbling;

‘The gymnasts rolled and jumped’;

Rollverb

sell something to or obtain something from by energetic and especially underhanded activity

Rollverb

move in a wavy pattern or with a rising and falling motion;

‘The curtains undulated’; ‘the waves rolled towards the beach’;

Rollverb

move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment;

‘The gypsies roamed the woods’; ‘roving vagabonds’; ‘the wandering Jew’; ‘The cattle roam across the prairie’; ‘the laborers drift from one town to the next’; ‘They rolled from town to town’;

Rollverb

move, rock, or sway from side to side;

‘The ship rolled on the heavy seas’;

Rollverb

cause to move by turning over or in a circular manner of as if on an axis;

‘She rolled the ball’; ‘They rolled their eyes at his words’;

Rollverb

pronounce with a roll, of the phoneme /r/;

‘She rolls her r's’;

Rollverb

boil vigorously;

‘The liquid was seething’; ‘The water rolled’;

Rollverb

take the shape of a roll or cylinder;

‘the carpet rolled out’; ‘Yarn rolls well’;

Rollverb

show certain properties when being rolled;

‘The carpet rolls unevenly’; ‘dried-out tobacco rolls badly’;

Rollverb

move in a particular direction by turning over and over on an axis

‘the car rolled down into a ditch’; ‘she rolled the ball across the floor’;

Rollverb

turn over to face a different direction

‘they rolled him over on to his back’; ‘she rolled on to her side’;

Rollverb

turn (one's eyes) upwards, typically to show surprise or disapproval

‘Sarah rolled her eyes to the ceiling’;

Rollverb

lie down and turn over and over while remaining in the same place

‘the buffalo rolled in the dust’;

Rollverb

(of a moving ship, aircraft, or vehicle) rock or oscillate round an axis parallel to the direction of motion

‘the ship pitched and rolled’;

Rollverb

move along or from side to side unsteadily or uncontrollably

‘they were rolling about with laughter’;

Rollverb

overturn (a vehicle)

‘he rolled his Mercedes in a 100 mph crash’;

Rollverb

throw (a die or dice)

‘he put all his chips on the table and rolled the dice’;

Rollverb

obtain (a particular score) by throwing a die or dice

‘roll a 2, 3, or 12’;

Rollverb

(of a vehicle) move or run on wheels

‘the van was rolling along the lane’;

Rollverb

move or push (a wheeled object)

‘Pat rolled the trolley to and fro’;

Rollverb

make a car window or a window blind move up or down by turning a handle

‘do not roll down the window to give a stranger directions’;

Rollverb

(of a drop of liquid) flow

‘huge tears rolled down her cheeks’;

Rollverb

(of time) elapse steadily

‘the years rolled by’;

Rollverb

(of a product) issue from (an assembly line or machine)

‘the first copies of the newspaper rolled off the presses’;

Rollverb

(of waves, smoke, cloud, or fog) move or flow forward with an undulating motion

‘the fog rolled across the fields’;

Rollverb

(of land) extend in gentle undulations.

Rollverb

(of credits for a film or television programme) be displayed as if moving on a roller up the screen

‘the end credits rolled and the title came up’;

Rollverb

(with reference to a machine, device, or system) operate or begin operating

‘the cameras started to roll’; ‘roll the camera’;

Rollverb

start moving; take action

‘the coast's clear—let's roll’;

Rollverb

behave in a particular way

‘that's just how I roll, guys—I'll smile until I physically can't’;

Rollverb

turn (something flexible) over and over on itself to form a cylinder, tube, or ball

‘she started to roll up her sleeping bag’;

Rollverb

fold the edge of a garment over on itself a number of times to shorten it

‘she rolled up her sleeves to wash her hands’;

Rollverb

make (something) by forming material into a cylinder or ball

‘Harry rolled himself a joint’;

Rollverb

curl up tightly

‘the shock made the hedgehog roll into a ball’;

Rollverb

flatten (something) by passing a roller over it or by passing it between rollers

‘roll out the dough on a floured surface’;

Rollverb

(of a loud, deep sound) reverberate

‘the first peals of thunder rolled across the sky’;

Rollverb

pronounce (a consonant, typically an r) with a trill

‘when he wanted to emphasize a point he rolled his rrrs’;

Rollverb

utter (a word or words) with a reverberating or vibratory effect

‘he rolled the word round his mouth’;

Rollverb

(of words) flow effortlessly or mellifluously

‘the names of his colleagues rolled off his lips’;

Rollverb

rob (someone, typically when they are intoxicated or asleep)

‘if you don't get drunk, you don't get rolled’;

Rollnoun

a cylinder formed by winding flexible material round a tube or by turning it over and over on itself without folding

‘a roll of carpet’;

Rollnoun

a cylindrical mass of something or a number of items arranged in a cylindrical shape

‘a roll of mints’;

Rollnoun

an item of food that is made by wrapping a flat sheet of pastry, cake, meat, or fish round a sweet or savoury filling

‘salmon and rice rolls’;

Rollnoun

a quantity of banknotes rolled together

‘I should eat out, enjoy the fat roll I'd taken out of my account’;

Rollnoun

a movement in which someone or something turns or is turned over on itself

‘a roll of the dice’;

Rollnoun

a gymnastic exercise in which a person tucks their head down and rolls their body in a forward or backwards circle on the floor

‘I used my momentum and tucked into a roll’;

Rollnoun

a complete rotation by a flying aircraft about its longitudinal axis.

Rollnoun

a swaying or oscillation of a ship, aircraft, or vehicle round an axis parallel to the direction of motion

‘the car corners capably with a minimum of roll’;

Rollnoun

a prolonged, deep, reverberating sound

‘thunder exploded, roll after roll’;

Rollnoun

one of the basic patterns (rudiments) of drumming, consisting of a sustained, rapid alternation of single or double strokes of each stick.

Rollnoun

a very small loaf of bread, to be eaten by one person

‘soup with a roll’; ‘a bacon roll’;

Rollnoun

an official list or register of names

‘the school had no one by his name on its roll’;

Rollnoun

the total number of names on a roll

‘a review of secondary schools to assess the effects of falling rolls’;

Rollnoun

a document, typically an official record, historically kept in scroll form.

Rollnoun

undulation of the landscape

‘hidden by the roll of the land was a refinery’;

Rollnoun

a roller for flattening something, especially one used to shape metal in a rolling mill.

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