VS.

Account vs. Motive

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Accountnoun

(accounting) A registry of pecuniary transactions; a written or printed statement of business dealings or debts and credits, and also of other things subjected to a reckoning or review.

Accountnoun

(banking) A sum of money deposited at a bank and subject to withdrawal.

‘to keep one's account at the bank.’;

Motivenoun

An incentive to act in a particular way; a reason or emotion that makes one want to do something; anything that prompts a choice of action.

Accountnoun

A statement in general of reasons, causes, grounds, etc., explanatory of some event; a reason of an action to be done.

‘No satisfactory account has been given of these phenomena.’;

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Motivenoun

(legal) Something which causes someone to want to commit a crime; a reason for criminal behaviour.

‘What would his motive be for burning down the cottage?’; ‘No-one could understand why she had hidden the shovel; her motives were obscure at best.’;

Accountnoun

(business) A business relationship involving the exchange of money and credit.

Motivenoun

A motif.

Accountnoun

A record of events; recital of transactions; a relation or narrative; a report; a description.

‘An account of a battle.’;

Motivenoun

(music) A motif; a theme or subject, especially one that is central to the work or often repeated.

‘If you listen carefully, you can hear the flutes mimicking the cello motive.’;

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Accountnoun

An estimate or estimation; valuation; judgment.

Motiveverb

(transitive) To prompt or incite by a motive or motives; to move.

Accountnoun

Importance; worth; value; esteem; judgement.

Motiveadjective

Causing motion; having power to move, or tending to move

‘a motive argument’; ‘motive power’;

Accountnoun

An authorization to use a service.

‘I've opened an account with Wikipedia so that I can contribute and partake in the project.’;

Motiveadjective

Relating to motion and/or to its cause

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Accountnoun

(archaic) A reckoning; computation; calculation; enumeration; a record of some reckoning.

Motivenoun

That which moves; a mover.

Accountnoun

Profit; advantage.

Motivenoun

That which incites to action; anything prompting or exciting to choise, or moving the will; cause; reason; inducement; object; motivation{2}.

‘By motive, I mean the whole of that which moves, excites, or invites the mind to volition, whether that be one thing singly, or many things conjunctively.’;

Motivenoun

The theme or subject; a leading phrase or passage which is reproduced and varied through the course of a comor a movement; a short figure, or melodic germ, out of which a whole movement is develpoed. See also Leading motive, under Leading.

Accountverb

To present an account of; to answer for, to justify.

Motivenoun

That which produces conception, invention, or creation in the mind of the artist in undertaking his subject; the guiding or controlling idea manifested in a work of art, or any part of one.

Accountverb

To give an account of financial transactions, money received etc.

Motiveadjective

Causing motion; having power to move, or tending to move; as, a motive argument; motive power.

Accountverb

(transitive) To estimate, consider (something to be as described).

Motiveverb

To prompt or incite by a motive or motives; to move.

Accountverb

(intransitive) To consider that.

Motivenoun

the psychological feature that arouses an organism to action toward a desired goal; the reason for the action; that which gives purpose and direction to behavior;

‘we did not understand his motivation’; ‘he acted with the best of motives’;

Accountverb

(intransitive) To give a satisfactory evaluation for financial transactions, money received etc.

‘An officer must account with or to the treasurer for money received.’;

Motivenoun

a theme that is elaborated on in a piece of music

Accountverb

(intransitive) To give a satisfactory evaluation for (one's actions, behaviour etc.); to answer for.

‘We must account for the use of our opportunities.’;

Motiveadjective

causing or able to cause motion;

‘a motive force’; ‘motive power’; ‘motor energy’;

Accountverb

(intransitive) To give a satisfactory reason for; to explain.

‘Idleness accounts for poverty.’;

Motiveadjective

impelling to action;

‘it may well be that ethical language has primarily a motivative function’; ‘motive pleas’; ‘motivating arguments’;

Accountverb

(intransitive) To establish the location for someone.

‘After the crash, not all passengers were accounted for.’;

Accountverb

(intransitive) To cause the death, capture, or destruction of someone or something (+ for).

Accountverb

To count.

Accountverb

To calculate, work out (especially with periods of time).

Accountverb

(obsolete) To count (up), enumerate.

Accountverb

(obsolete) To recount, relate (a narrative etc.).

Accountnoun

A reckoning; computation; calculation; enumeration; a record of some reckoning; as, the Julian account of time.

‘A beggarly account of empty boxes.’;

Accountnoun

A registry of pecuniary transactions; a written or printed statement of business dealings or debts and credits, and also of other things subjected to a reckoning or review; as, to keep one's account at the bank.

Accountnoun

A statement in general of reasons, causes, grounds, etc., explanatory of some event; as, no satisfactory account has been given of these phenomena. Hence, the word is often used simply for reason, ground, consideration, motive, etc.; as, on no account, on every account, on all accounts.

Accountnoun

A statement of facts or occurrences; recital of transactions; a relation or narrative; a report; a description; as, an account of a battle.

Accountnoun

A statement and explanation or vindication of one's conduct with reference to judgment thereon.

‘Give an account of thy stewardship.’;

Accountnoun

An estimate or estimation; valuation; judgment.

Accountnoun

Importance; worth; value; advantage; profit.

‘This other part . . . makes account to find no slender arguments for this assertion out of those very scriptures which are commonly urged against it.’;

Accountverb

To reckon; to compute; to count.

‘The motion of . . . the sun whereby years are accounted.’;

Accountverb

To place to one's account; to put to the credit of; to assign; - with to.

Accountverb

To value, estimate, or hold in opinion; to judge or consider; to deem.

‘Accounting that God was able to raise him up.’;

Accountverb

To recount; to relate.

Accountverb

To render or receive an account or relation of particulars; as, an officer must account with or to the treasurer for money received.

Accountverb

To render an account; to answer in judgment; - with for; as, we must account for the use of our opportunities.

Accountverb

To give a satisfactory reason; to tell the cause of; to explain; - with for; as, idleness accounts for poverty.

‘Newer was preaching more accounted of than in the sixteenth century.’;

Accountnoun

a formal contractual relationship established to provide for regular banking or brokerage or business services;

‘he asked to see the executive who handled his account’;

Accountnoun

the act of informing by verbal report;

‘he heard reports that they were causing trouble’; ‘by all accounts they were a happy couple’;

Accountnoun

a record or narrative description of past events;

‘a history of France’; ‘he gave an inaccurate account of the plot to kill the president’; ‘the story of exposure to lead’;

Accountnoun

a short account of the news;

‘the report of his speech’; ‘the story was on the 11 o'clock news’; ‘the account of his speech that was given on the evening news made the governor furious’;

Accountnoun

a statement of recent transactions and the resulting balance;

‘they send me an accounting every month’;

Accountnoun

a statement that makes something comprehensible by describing the relevant structure or operation or circumstances etc.;

‘the explanation was very simple’; ‘I expected a brief account’;

Accountnoun

an itemized statement of money owed for goods shipped or services rendered;

‘he paid his bill and left’; ‘send me an account of what I owe’;

Accountnoun

grounds;

‘don't do it on my account’; ‘the paper was rejected on account of its length’; ‘he tried to blame the victim but his success on that score was doubtful’;

Accountnoun

importance or value;

‘a person of considerable account’; ‘he predicted that although it is of small account now it will rapidly increase in importance’;

Accountnoun

the quality of taking advantage;

‘she turned her writing skills to good account’;

Accountverb

be the sole or primary factor in the existence, acquisition, supply, or disposal of something;

‘Passing grades account for half of the grades given in this exam’;

Accountverb

keep an account of

Accountverb

to give an account or representation of in words;

‘Discreet Italian police described it in a manner typically continental’;

Accountverb

furnish a justifying analysis or explanation;

‘I can't account for the missing money’;

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