VS.

Academic vs. Moot

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Academicadjective

Belonging to the school or philosophy of Plato

‘the academic sect or philosophy’;

Mootadjective

Subject to discussion (originally at a moot); arguable, debatable, unsolved or impossible to solve.

Academicadjective

Belonging to an academy or other higher institution of learning; also a scholarly society or organization.

Mootadjective

Being an exercise of thought; academic.

‘Walter Crane and Lewis F. Day (1903) Moot Points: Friendly Disputes on Art and Industry Between Walter Crane and Lewis F. Day’;

Academicadjective

Theoretical or speculative; abstract; scholarly, literary or classical, in distinction to practical or vocational

‘I have always had an academic interest in hacking.’;

Mootadjective

(North America) Having no practical impact or relevance.

‘That point may make for a good discussion, but it is moot.’;

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Academicadjective

Having little practical use or value, as by being overly detailed, unengaging, or theoretical: having no practical importance.

Mootnoun

A moot court.

Academicadjective

Having a love of or aptitude for learning.

‘I'm more academic than athletic — I get lower marks in phys. ed. than in anything else.’;

Mootnoun

A system of arbitration in many areas of Africa in which the primary goal is to settle a dispute and reintegrate adversaries into society rather than assess penalties.

Academicadjective

(art) Conforming to set rules and traditions; conventional; formalistic.

Mootnoun

(Scouting) A gathering of Rovers, usually in the form of a camp lasting 2 weeks.

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Academicadjective

So scholarly as to be unaware of the outside world; lacking in worldliness.

Mootnoun

(paganism) A social gathering of pagans, normally held in a public house.

Academicadjective

Subscribing to the architectural standards of Vitruvius.

Mootnoun

(historical) An assembly (usually for decision making in a locality).

Academicadjective

Study of humanities topics rather than science and engineering.

Mootnoun

(shipbuilding) A ring for gauging wooden pins.

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Academicnoun

A follower of Plato, a Platonist.

Mootnoun

A whisper, or an insinuation, also gossip or rumors.

‘Na, I haven't heard a moot of it.’; ‘Haven't you heard the moot, mate? There are going to be layoffs. They are going to shit-can the lot of us.’;

Academicnoun

A senior member of an academy, college, or university; a person who attends an academy; a person engaged in scholarly pursuits; one who is academic in practice.

Mootnoun

Talk.

‘No, there's no moot of it on the streets.’; ‘There's some moot of charges, but nothing concrete yet.’;

Academicnoun

A member of the Academy; an academician.

Mootnoun

(Australia) Vagina.

Academicnoun

(archaic) A student in a college.

Mootnoun

(West Country) The stump of a tree; the roots and bottom end of a felled tree.

Academicnoun

(pluralonly) Academic dress; academicals.

Mootverb

To bring up as a subject for debate, to propose.

Academicnoun

(pluralonly) Academic studies.

Mootverb

To discuss or debate.

Academicadjective

Belonging to the school or philosophy of Plato; as, the Academic sect or philosophy.

Mootverb

(US) To make or declare irrelevant.

Academicadjective

Belonging to an academy or other higher institution of learning; scholarly; literary or classical, in distinction from scientific.

Mootverb

To argue or plead in a supposed case.

Academicnoun

One holding the philosophy of Socrates and Plato; a Platonist.

Mootverb

To talk or speak.

‘'Tis no boot to moot again of it.’;

Academicnoun

A member of an academy, college, or university; an academician.

Mootverb

To say, utter, also insinuate.

‘He could not moot the words.’;

Academicnoun

an educator who works at a college or university

Mootverb

(West Country) To take root and begin to grow.

Academicadjective

associated with academia or an academy;

‘the academic curriculum’; ‘academic gowns’;

Mootverb

(West Country) To turn up soil or dig up roots, especially an animal with the snout.

Academicadjective

hypothetical or theoretical and not expected to produce an immediate or practical result;

‘an academic discussion’; ‘an academic question’;

Mootverb

See 1st Mot.

Academicadjective

marked by a narrow focus on or display of learning especially its trivial aspects

Mootverb

To argue for and against; to debate; to discuss; to propose for discussion.

‘A problem which hardly has been mentioned, much less mooted, in this country.’;

Mootverb

Specifically: To discuss by way of exercise; to argue for practice; to propound and discuss in a mock court.

‘First a case is appointed to be mooted by certain young men, containing some doubtful controversy.’;

Mootverb

To render inconsequential, as having no effect on the practical outcome; to render academic; as, the ruling that the law was invalid mooted the question of whether he actually violated it.

Mootverb

To argue or plead in a supposed case.

‘There is a difference between mooting and pleading; between fencing and fighting.’;

Mootnoun

A ring for gauging wooden pins.

Mootnoun

A meeting for discussion and deliberation; esp., a meeting of the people of a village or district, in Anglo-Saxon times, for the discussion and settlement of matters of common interest; - usually in composition; as, folk-moot.

Mootnoun

A discussion or debate; especially, a discussion of fictitious causes by way of practice.

‘The pleading used in courts and chancery called moots.’;

Mootadjective

Subject, or open, to argument or discussion; undecided; debatable; mooted.

Mootadjective

Of purely theoretical or academic interest; having no practical consequence; as, the team won in spite of the bad call, and whether the ruling was correct is a moot question.

Mootnoun

a hypothetical case that law students argue as an exercise;

‘he organized the weekly moot’;

Mootverb

think about carefully; weigh;

‘They considered the possibility of a strike’; ‘Turn the proposal over in your mind’;

Mootadjective

of no legal significance (as having been previously decided)

Mootadjective

open to argument or debate;

‘that is a moot question’;

Mootadjective

subject to debate, dispute, or uncertainty

‘whether the temperature rise was mainly due to the greenhouse effect was a moot point’; ‘it is a moot point whether such a controversial scheme would have succeeded’;

Mootadjective

having little or no practical relevance, typically because the subject is too uncertain to allow a decision

‘the whole matter is becoming increasingly moot’;

Mootverb

raise (a question or topic) for discussion; suggest (an idea or possibility)

‘the scheme was first mooted last October’;

Mootnoun

an assembly held for debate, especially in Anglo-Saxon and medieval times.

Mootnoun

a regular gathering of people having a common interest.

Mootnoun

a mock judicial proceeding set up to examine a hypothetical case as an academic exercise

‘the object of a moot is to provide practice in developing an argument’;

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