VS.

Abrupt vs. Gradual

Published:

Abruptadjective

Broken away (from restraint).

Gradualadjective

Proceeding or advancing by small, slow, regular steps or degrees

‘a gradual increase of knowledge; a gradual decline’;

Abruptadjective

Without notice to prepare the mind for the event; sudden; hasty; unceremonious.

‘The party came to an abrupt end when the parents of our host arrived.’;

Gradualnoun

(Christianity) An antiphon or responsory after the epistle, in the Mass, which was sung on the steps, or while the deacon ascended the steps.

Abruptadjective

Curt in manner.

Gradualnoun

(Christianity) A service book containing the musical portions of the Mass.

ADVERTISEMENT

Abruptadjective

Having sudden transitions from one subject or state to another; unconnected; disjointed.

Gradualadjective

Proceeding by steps or degrees; advancing, step by step, as in ascent or descent or from one state to another; regularly progressive; slow; as, a gradual increase of knowledge; a gradual decline.

‘Creatures animate with gradual lifeOf growth, sense, reason, all summed up in man.’;

Abruptadjective

(obsolete) Broken off.

Gradualnoun

An antiphon or responsory after the epistle, in the Mass, which was sung on the steps, or while the deacon ascended the steps.

Abruptadjective

Extremely steep or craggy as if broken up; precipitous.

Gradualnoun

A series of steps.

ADVERTISEMENT

Abruptadjective

(botany) Suddenly terminating, as if cut off; truncate.

Gradualnoun

(Roman Catholic Church) an antiphon (usually from the Book of Psalms) immediately after the epistle at Mass

Abruptverb

To tear off or asunder.

Gradualadjective

proceeding in small stages;

‘a gradual increase in prices’;

Abruptverb

To interrupt suddenly.

Gradualadjective

of a topographical gradient; not steep or abrupt;

‘a gradual slope’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Abruptnoun

(poetic) Something which is abrupt; an abyss.

Gradual

The gradual (Latin: graduale or responsorium graduale) is a chant or hymn in the Mass, the liturgical celebration of the Eucharist in the Catholic Church, and among some other Christians. It gets its name from the Latin gradus (meaning ) because it was once chanted on the step of the ambo or altar.

‘step’;

Abruptadjective

Broken off; very steep, or craggy, as rocks, precipices, banks; precipitous; steep; as, abrupt places.

Abruptadjective

Without notice to prepare the mind for the event; sudden; hasty; unceremonious.

Abruptadjective

Having sudden transitions from one subject to another; unconnected.

‘The abrupt style, which hath many breaches.’;

Abruptadjective

Suddenly terminating, as if cut off.

Abruptnoun

An abrupt place.

Abruptverb

To tear off or asunder.

Abruptadjective

marked by sudden changes in subject and sharp transitions;

‘abrupt prose’;

Abruptadjective

exceedingly sudden and unexpected;

‘came to an abrupt stop’; ‘an abrupt change in the weather’;

Abruptadjective

extremely steep;

‘an abrupt canyon’; ‘the precipitous rapids of the upper river’; ‘the precipitous hills of Chinese paintings’; ‘a sharp drop’;

Abruptadjective

surprisingly and unceremoniously brusque in manner;

‘an abrupt reply’;

Gradual Illustrations

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons