VS.

Abrasion vs. Scrape

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Abrasionnoun

The act of abrading, wearing, or rubbing off; the wearing away by friction.

Scrapeverb

(ambitransitive) To draw (an object, especially a sharp or angular one), along (something) while exerting pressure.

‘She scraped her fingernails across the blackboard, making a shrill sound.’; ‘She scraped the blackboard with her fingernails.’; ‘Her fingernails scraped across the blackboard.’;

Abrasionnoun

(obsolete) The substance thus rubbed off; debris.

Scrapeverb

(transitive) To remove (something) by drawing an object along in this manner.

‘Scrape the chewing gum off with a knife.’;

Abrasionnoun

(geology) The effect of mechanical erosion of rock, especially a river bed, by rock fragments scratching and scraping it.

Scrapeverb

(transitive) To injure or damage by rubbing across a surface.

‘She tripped on a rock and scraped her knee.’;

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Abrasionnoun

An abraded, scraped, or worn area.

Scrapeverb

(transitive) To barely manage to achieve.

‘I scraped a pass in the exam.’;

Abrasionnoun

(medicine) A superficial wound caused by scraping; an area of skin where the cells on the surface have been scraped or worn away.

Scrapeverb

(transitive) To collect or gather, especially without regard to the quality of what is chosen.

‘Just use whatever you can scrape together.’;

Abrasionnoun

(dentistry) The wearing away of the surface of the tooth by chewing.

Scrapeverb

(computing) To extract data by automated means from a format not intended to be machine-readable, such as a screenshot or a formatted web page.

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Abrasionnoun

The act of abrading, wearing, or rubbing off; the wearing away by friction; as, the abrasion of coins.

Scrapeverb

(intransitive) To occupy oneself with getting laboriously.

‘He scraped and saved until he became rich.’;

Abrasionnoun

The substance rubbed off.

Scrapeverb

(ambitransitive) To play awkwardly and inharmoniously on a violin or similar instrument.

Abrasionnoun

A superficial excoriation, with loss of substance under the form of small shreds.

Scrapeverb

To draw back the right foot along the ground or floor when making a bow.

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Abrasionnoun

an abraded area where the skin is torn or worn off

Scrapeverb

To express disapprobation of (a play, etc.) or to silence (a speaker) by drawing the feet back and forth upon the floor; usually with down.

Abrasionnoun

erosion by friction

Scrapenoun

A broad, shallow injury left by scraping (rather than a cut or a scratch).

‘He fell on the sidewalk and got a scrape on his knee.’;

Abrasionnoun

the wearing down of rock particles by friction due to water or wind or ice

Scrapenoun

A fight, especially a fistfight without weapons.

‘He got in a scrape with the school bully.’;

Abrasionnoun

the process of scraping or wearing something away

‘the metal is resistant to abrasion’;

Scrapenoun

An awkward set of circumstances.

‘I'm in a bit of a scrape — I've no money to buy my wife a birthday present.’;

Abrasionnoun

an area damaged by scraping or wearing away

‘there were cuts and abrasions to the lips and jaw’;

Scrapenoun

A D and C or abortion; or, a miscarriage.

Scrapenoun

A shallow depression used by ground birds as a nest; a nest scrape.

Scrapenoun

(military) A shallow pit dug as a hideout.

Scrapeverb

To rub over the surface of (something) with a sharp or rough instrument; to rub over with something that roughens by removing portions of the surface; to grate harshly over; to abrade; to make even, or bring to a required condition or form, by moving the sharp edge of an instrument breadthwise over the surface with pressure, cutting away excesses and superfluous parts; to make smooth or clean; as, to scrape a bone with a knife; to scrape a metal plate to an even surface.

Scrapeverb

To remove by rubbing or scraping (in the sense above).

‘I will also scrape her dust from her, and make her like the top of a rock.’;

Scrapeverb

To collect by, or as by, a process of scraping; to gather in small portions by laborious effort; hence, to acquire avariciously and save penuriously; - often followed by together or up; as, to scrape money together.

‘The prelatical party complained that, to swell a number the nonconformists did not choose, but scrape, subscribers.’;

Scrapeverb

To express disapprobation of, as a play, or to silence, as a speaker, by drawing the feet back and forth upon the floor; - usually with down.

‘He tried to scrape acquaintance with her, but failed ignominiously.’;

Scrapeverb

To rub over the surface of anything with something which roughens or removes it, or which smooths or cleans it; to rub harshly and noisily along.

Scrapeverb

To occupy one's self with getting laboriously; as, he scraped and saved until he became rich.

Scrapeverb

To play awkwardly and inharmoniously on a violin or like instrument.

Scrapeverb

To draw back the right foot along the ground or floor when making a bow.

Scrapenoun

The act of scraping; also, the effect of scraping, as a scratch, or a harsh sound; as, a noisy scrape on the floor; a scrape of a pen.

Scrapenoun

A drawing back of the right foot when bowing; also, a bow made with that accompaniment.

Scrapenoun

A disagreeable and embarrassing predicament out of which one can not get without undergoing, as it were, a painful rubbing or scraping; a perplexity; a difficulty.

‘The too eager pursuit of this his old enemy through thick and thin has led him into many of these scrapes.’;

Scrapenoun

a harsh noise made by scraping;

‘the scrape of violin bows distracted her’;

Scrapenoun

an abraded area where the skin is torn or worn off

Scrapenoun

a deep bow with the foot drawn backwards (indicating excessive humility);

‘all that bowing and scraping did not impress him’;

Scrapenoun

an indication of damage

Scrapeverb

scratch repeatedly;

‘The cat scraped at the armchair’;

Scrapeverb

make by scraping;

‘They scraped a letter into the stone’;

Scrapeverb

cut the surface of; wear away the surface of

Scrapeverb

bend the knees and bow in a servile manner

Scrapeverb

gather (money or other resources) together over time;

‘She had scraped together enough money for college’;

Scrapeverb

bruise, cut, or injure the skin or the surface of;

‘The boy skinned his knee when he fell’;

Scrapeverb

strike against an object;

‘She stubbed her one's toe in the dark and now it's broken’;

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