VS.

Abate vs. Humble

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Abateverb

To put an end to; to cause to cease.

‘to abate a nuisance’;

Humbleadjective

Not pretentious or magnificent; unpretending; unassuming.

‘He lives in a humble one-bedroom cottage.’;

Abateverb

(intransitive) To become null and void.

‘The writ has abated.’;

Humbleadjective

Having a low opinion of oneself; not proud, arrogant, or assuming; modest.

Abateverb

To nullify; make void.

‘to abate a writ’;

Humbleverb

To bring low; to reduce the power, independence, or exaltation of; to lower; to abase; to humiliate.

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Abateverb

To humble; to lower in status; to bring someone down physically or mentally.

Humbleverb

To make humble or lowly in mind; to abase the pride or arrogance of; to reduce the self-sufficiency of; to make meek and submissive.

Abateverb

To be humbled; to be brought down physically or mentally.

Humbleverb

(transitive) lang=en.

Abateverb

To curtail; to deprive.

‘Order restrictions and prohibitions to abate an emergency situation.’;

Humbleadjective

Near the ground; not high or lofty; not pretentious or magnificent; unpretending; unassuming; as, a humble cottage.

‘THy humble nest built on the ground.’;

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Abateverb

(transitive) To reduce in amount, size, or value.

‘Legacies are liable to be abated entirely or in proportion, upon a deficiency of assets.’;

Humbleadjective

Thinking lowly of one's self; claiming little for one's self; not proud, arrogant, or assuming; thinking one's self ill-deserving or unworthy, when judged by the demands of God; lowly; waek; modest.

‘God resisteth the proud, but giveth grace unto the humble.’; ‘She should be humble who would please.’; ‘Without a humble imitation of the divine Author of our . . . religion we can never hope to be a happy nation.’;

Abateverb

(intransitive) To decrease in size, value, or amount.

Humbleadjective

Hornless. See Hummel.

Abateverb

(transitive) To moderate; to lessen in force, intensity, to subside.

Humbleverb

To bring low; to reduce the power, independence, or exaltation of; to lower; to abase; to humilate.

‘Here, take this purse, thou whom the heaven's plaguesHave humbled to all strokes.’; ‘The genius which humbled six marshals of France.’;

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Abateverb

(intransitive) To decrease in intensity or force; to subside.

Humbleverb

To make humble or lowly in mind; to abase the pride or arrogance of; to reduce the self-sufficiently of; to make meek and submissive; - often used rexlexively.

‘Humble yourselves therefore under the mighty hand of God, that he may exalt you.’;

Abateverb

(transitive) To deduct or omit.

‘We will abate this price from the total.’;

Humbleverb

cause to be unpretentious;

‘This experience will humble him’;

Abateverb

(transitive) To bar or except.

Humbleverb

cause to feel shame; hurt the pride of;

‘He humiliated his colleague by criticising him in front of the boss’;

Abateverb

(transitive) To cut away or hammer down, in such a way as to leave a figure in relief, as a sculpture, or in metalwork.

Humbleadjective

low or inferior in station or quality;

‘a humble cottage’; ‘a lowly parish priest’; ‘a modest man of the people’; ‘small beginnings’;

Abateverb

To dull the edge or point of; to blunt.

Humbleadjective

marked by meekness or modesty; not arrogant or prideful;

‘a humble apology’; ‘essentially humble...and self-effacing, he achieved the highest formal honors and distinctions’;

Abateverb

To destroy, or level to the ground.

Humbleadjective

used of unskilled work (especially domestic work)

Abateverb

to enter a tenement without permission after the owner has died and before the heir takes possession.

Humbleadjective

of low birth or station (`base' is archaic in this sense);

‘baseborn wretches with dirty faces’; ‘of humble (or lowly) birth’;

Abatenoun

Abatement.

Abatenoun

an Italian abbot, or other member of the clergy.

Abateverb

To beat down; to overthrow.

‘The King of Scots . . . sore abated the walls.’;

Abateverb

To bring down or reduce from a higher to a lower state, number, or degree; to lessen; to diminish; to contract; to moderate; to cut short; as, to abate a demand; to abate pride, zeal, hope.

‘His eye was not dim, nor his natural force abated.’;

Abateverb

To deduct; to omit; as, to abate something from a price.

‘Nine thousand parishes, abating the odd hundreds.’;

Abateverb

To blunt.

‘To abate the edge of envy.’;

Abateverb

To reduce in estimation; to deprive.

‘She hath abated me of half my train.’;

Abateverb

To bring entirely down or put an end to; to do away with; as, to abate a nuisance, to abate a writ.

Abateverb

To decrease, or become less in strength or violence; as, pain abates, a storm abates.

‘The fury of Glengarry . . . rapidly abated.’;

Abateverb

To be defeated, or come to naught; to fall through; to fail; as, a writ abates.

Abatenoun

Abatement.

Abateverb

make less active or intense

Abateverb

become less in amount or intensity;

‘The storm abated’; ‘The rain let up after a few hours’;

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